Successfully reported this slideshow.
•DEFINITION: Overgrowth of breast cells.

•Most breast cancers begin in the cells that line the ducts or the

lobules. A s...
•Growth abnormally of the cells and the formation of the lump.
•The cancer cells can be able to spread beyond the breast.
Statistical Information Team at Cancer Research UK, 2012
Gender
Age

Hormonal factors
Previous breast conditions

•Exposure to the oestrogen and
progesterone hormones for long and...
DUCTAL
CARCINOMA

LOBULAR
CARCINOMA

Ductal
carcinoma in situ
Invasive ductal
carcinoma
Lobular
carcinoma in situ
Invasive...
SURGERY

CHEMOTHERAPY

RADIOTHERAPY

Mastectomy
Lumpectomy

HORMONAL
THERAPY
Diagnosis

After surgery

•Stress
•Anxiety
•Fear
Adaptation to a new
body image

Reintegration into
family life

• Treatme...
BREAST

•Femininity
•Reproduction
Sexual and attractive
meaning

•Life
•Motherhood
•Breastfeeding

LOSS THEIR IDENTITY AS ...
MARITAL ROLE
BREAST
CANCERFamiliar
’S

TREATMENTS

Marital

LESS SEXUAL
ATRACTION

•Loss of breast;
Professional hair;
•Lo...
Psychosocial
Impact

Negation

Acceptance

Revolt

Wrong coping COPING
strategies STRATEGIES

Depression

Destruction of
q...
• Encourage changes in psychosocial aspects;

GOALS:

• Upgrade the current lifestyle;
•Improve the quality of life.

•Pro...
•American Cancer Society. Breast Cancer Facts & Figures 2011-2012. Atlanta: American Cancer
Society, Inc, 2012.
•American ...
The psychosocial impact of the breast cancer patients
The psychosocial impact of the breast cancer patients
The psychosocial impact of the breast cancer patients
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

The psychosocial impact of the breast cancer patients

1,032 views

Published on

Presentation about the psychosocial impact of the breast cancer patients, speccially in the post-mastectomy, and the importance of the nursing role.

Published in: Health & Medicine
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

The psychosocial impact of the breast cancer patients

  1. 1. •DEFINITION: Overgrowth of breast cells. •Most breast cancers begin in the cells that line the ducts or the lobules. A small number start in other tissues. •Breast tumours can be classified in: BENIGN TUMOUR MALIGN TUMOUR
  2. 2. •Growth abnormally of the cells and the formation of the lump.
  3. 3. •The cancer cells can be able to spread beyond the breast.
  4. 4. Statistical Information Team at Cancer Research UK, 2012
  5. 5. Gender Age Hormonal factors Previous breast conditions •Exposure to the oestrogen and progesterone hormones for long and uninterrupted periods; • Nulliparity or 1st pregnancy after 30; •Not having breastfed breastfeeding; •Overweight or obesity; • Early menstruation (before 12); •Sedentary life; Family history •Late menopause (after 50). •Addiction; •High-fat diet; Non-reprodutive lifestyle factors •Shift work; •Radiation exposure. or
  6. 6. DUCTAL CARCINOMA LOBULAR CARCINOMA Ductal carcinoma in situ Invasive ductal carcinoma Lobular carcinoma in situ Invasive lobular carcinoma
  7. 7. SURGERY CHEMOTHERAPY RADIOTHERAPY Mastectomy Lumpectomy HORMONAL THERAPY
  8. 8. Diagnosis After surgery •Stress •Anxiety •Fear Adaptation to a new body image Reintegration into family life • Treatment • Disease's impact in their life • Pain •Recurrence •Death Rehabilitation work
  9. 9. BREAST •Femininity •Reproduction Sexual and attractive meaning •Life •Motherhood •Breastfeeding LOSS THEIR IDENTITY AS A WOMAN
  10. 10. MARITAL ROLE BREAST CANCERFamiliar ’S TREATMENTS Marital LESS SEXUAL ATRACTION •Loss of breast; Professional hair; •Loss of •Increase in weight Social DECREASE OF SEXUAL SATISFACTION
  11. 11. Psychosocial Impact Negation Acceptance Revolt Wrong coping COPING strategies STRATEGIES Depression Destruction of quality of life Isolation
  12. 12. • Encourage changes in psychosocial aspects; GOALS: • Upgrade the current lifestyle; •Improve the quality of life. •Provide an atmosphere of acceptance, openness and availability as well as privacy for patient. •Promote a calm and quiet environment. •Explore with her previous methods of dealing with life problems. •Encourage verbalization of their feelings and fears. •Encourage to identify their own strengths and abilities. •Arrange social support. •Encourage the participation in breast cancer support groups.
  13. 13. •American Cancer Society. Breast Cancer Facts & Figures 2011-2012. Atlanta: American Cancer Society, Inc, 2012. •American Cancer Society. Breast Cancer. Atlanta: American Cancer Society, Inc, 2013; •Arroyo, J.; López, M. Psychological Problems Derived from Mastectomy: A Qualitative Study. International Journal of Surgical Oncology. 2011; •Compas, B.; Luecken, L. Psychosocial Adjustment to Breast Cancer. American Psychological Society. 2002; •Dahl, C.; Reinersten, K.; Nesvold, I. A Study of Body Image in Long-Term Breast Cancer Survivors. Journal Cancer. 2010; •Fallbjork, U.; Rasmussen, B.; Karlsson, S.; Salander, P. Aspects of body image after mastectomy due to breast cancer e A two-year follow-up study. European Journal of Oncology Nursing. 2012; •Gumus, A.; Çam, O. Effects of Emotional Support-Focused Nursing Interventions on the Psychosocial Adjustment of Breast Cancer Patients. Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention, Vol. 9, 2008; •National Cancer Institute. What you need to know about breast cancer. National Institutes of Health. 2012; •Paiva, L.; Dantas, D; Silva, F. [et. al]. Body image and sexuality of women who underwent a radical mastectomy: integrative review. Journal of Nursing UFPE Online, 2013; •Shoma, A. [et. al]. Body image disturbance and surgical decision making in Egyptian post menopausal breast cancer patients. World Journal of Surgical Oncology, 2009.

×