WCT Annual Report 2012 - 2013

639 views

Published on

WCT Annual Report 2012 - 2013

  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

WCT Annual Report 2012 - 2013

  1. 1. VISION: Releasing Communities’ Potential MISSION: Working together to find the best ways to shape and deliver activities, services and experiences that create a greater sense of community and belonging 2012-2013 ANNUAL REPORT Together We Can 56943 WCT Annual Report 2012 - 2013 V3.indd 2 www.worcestercommunitytrust.org.uk Tel: 01905 453453 05/12/2013 16:31
  2. 2. Trustee Information Val Yates Val was a founding member of Westside Worcester and is currently the Director of Access and Inclusion at the University of Worcester. Pam Clayton Pam Clayton is a founder member of Worcester Community Trust and was Chairman of Warndon Community Centre and a City Councillor. She is a Parish Councillor for St Peters Worcester and Chairman of Worcester`s Family and Community Forum, a Member of the Play Council, and Chairman of Worcester`s Crime Prevention Panel. A retired Assistant Head Teacher, she writes for the European Association of Teachers and is married to Philip Clayton, a retired Head Teacher at the Chantry High School, Martley. George Davidge Originally from East London, George has worked and lived in many places in England and Wales and has lived in Warndon since 1997. He is a member of a number of Council and Housing Association panels, and played a role in the establishment of the new Warndon Youth and Community Centre. George retired in 2009 and is married with one son. Sally Ellison Sally is currently Chief Officer at Worcester Volunteer Centre which promotes and supports the local voluntary and community sector in Worcester. Sally chairs and sits on a number of active boards across the region which aims to support local communities and individuals. Sarah Hemming Sarah, 33, was born and brought up in Bromsgrove and now lives in the Cathedral area of Worcester. From 2001 to 2007 she worked in the Human Resources and Equality Departments at West Mercia Police. For the past six years she has worked at Hereford and Worcester Fire Service where she is now Human Resources Officer. Adrian Newman Adrian initially trained and worked in the mechanical engineering sector, and became a part-time youth worker with Worcestershire County Council in 1975. In 2000 he took on a full-time youth worker post, and retired in 2011 as Service Delivery Manager for Children and Young People. He is a founding member and executive director of Youthcomm, and a member of the Worcester Local Children’s Partnership. Adrian is also an occasional lecturer on youth and community work at Worcester University, where he facilitates a professional development group for degree level students. Jabba Riaz Councillor for Cathedral Ward and an original founding member of WCT. Jabba served as Cabinet Member for Safer & Stronger in Worcester City Council’s Administration between 2012-13 and served as Chair of Licensing between 2010-2011. Jabba is a keen sportsman and currently works at Air Products PLC as a Distribution Manager. Jabba believes strongly in empowering local communities and also sits on WCT’s Business Development sub-group. Adam Scott Adam Scott recently retired as a Director in local government and returned to his home town of Worcester where he has become involved with local community activity. His experience in regeneration and environment and as a senior manager is being put to good use with WCT. Robin Sykes Robin lives in Worcester and is married with two children and two grand-children He spent 20 Years in industry as the Chairman of companies in Europe and South America, and also as owner of Actis, a strategic management company with clients in the UK, France, Malaysia and Singapore. He is a founding member of St Pauls Hostel for the single homeless, a member of the Worcester Palestine Friendship Group, and hears mental health appeals as an Associate Hospital Manager for Worcester Health and Care NHS Trust. 56943 WCT Annual Report 2012 - 2013 V3.indd 3 05/12/2013 16:31
  3. 3. Senior Management Team Simon Murphy - Interim CEO Simon grew up in Droitwich and is a long term resident of Worcester where he lives with his wife and two children. A former university tutor (he holds a PhD in Northern Irish politics) Simon has been a local government Director, a chamber of commerce Chief Executive, and was also a Member of the European Parliament representing Worcester. He chairs a company that builds GP health centres in the Black Country, and is a Trustee of the charity Groundwork West Midlands. In his spare time he coaches junior rugby at Worcester RFC on Sunday mornings. Edd Terrey - Service Development Manager Prior to joining WCT in 2010, Edd was a Senior Youth Worker for Worcestershire County Council in Redditch and led a countywide anti-social behaviour project for Warwickshire Youth Offending Service. He is currently a Director of Your Ideas Youth & Community Project based in Redditch and is married with a two year old daughter. Deborah Barrow - Business Support Manager Deb joined WCT 2 years ago initially as the Training Co-ordinator and now leads the business support teams which include HR, Customer Service and Facilities. Previous roles have included Diversity Manager with both West Mercia Police and West Mercia Probation Trust. As Worcester Alliance Co-ordinator for Worcester City Council she founded the city’s Community Engagement Forum. Other interests have included being a trustee for Asha Women’s Centre and Worcester YMCA and leading WCT’s DAWN (domestic abuse) and Jobcafe projects. Deb is married to Norman, a retired fire officer, and lives in the country near Martley with 18 year old twin sons. John Denton - Business Development Officer John has worked in the charitable sector for over thirty years and has been Chief Executive of two arts organisations, Milton Keynes Community Workshop Trust (now Artworks MK) and Worcester Arts Workshop which he ran for eighteen years. He joined the Trust in August, 2011, and has responsibility for day-to-day financial matters. He has a degree in Economics and is a practising musician outside of his duties with the Trust. Our Values • • • • • • Putting the needs of communities at the heart of everything we do Supporting the empowerment of communities, staff and volunteers to make a real impact Making democratic decisions with integrity Embracing diversity, innovation, enterprise and partnerships Taking responsibility, always improving and being solution focused to become the best we can be Working together – One team, one aim 56943 WCT Annual Report 2012 - 2013 V3.indd 4 05/12/2013 16:31
  4. 4. Chair’s Report The volume and variety of work detailed in this year’s annual report makes a strong case for community-led non-statutory organisations such as Worcester Community Trust. In the shadow of significant reductions in local authority resources, a challenging local employment climate and the burgeoning effects of the austerity measures, the Trust has continued to deliver high quality youth and community development programmes that have improved the lives and life chances of the people within the communities that we serve. The Trust has, against the backdrop of a Transfer of Undertakings – Protection of Employment (TUPE) process and a considerable reduction in resource, built a diverse body of work. This includes both intervention programmes like the community DAWN project and Improving Futures, and development programmes including youth mentoring and personal and social development work. The participation in Trust activity from within the local community is considerable and we must congratulate the staff, members and volunteers for their commitment, professionalism and enthusiasm which have driven this year’s successes. We must also be mindful going forward that the Trust will face many challenges in maintaining our current levels of activity. We must explore every avenue to build up the Trust’s capacity to deliver the excellent work developed throughout the year. We must continue to invest in our staff and volunteers to ensure that the Trust has the skills and expertise necessary to meet these challenges, and the Trust must be prepared to make clear strategic decisions on the direction and nature of our work. The period following the transfer of staff to the Trust from both local authorities was difficult for all involved. Decisions about terms and conditions, staffing levels and the subsequent redundancy process were managed successfully through the sensitivity and commitment of all the staff. The Board and myself, as Chair, have been continually grateful to the Trust senior management team for their handling of these processes. At the conclusion of this process, Esther Passingham, the Trust Chief Officer, whose appointment was made specifically to oversee this process, indicated her desire to move on and pass on the leadership of the new organisation. Esther accomplished this role with upmost professionalism, commitment and skill and can be proud of the journey through which she led the Trust and the organisation as it now stands. We wish Esther every luck in her new endeavours. We also said goodbye to John Argent and Paul Chaplin both of whom served as members of the Trust Board. Our thanks to both for their input, skill and expertise throughout their time with the Trust. We welcomed three new Board members, Adam Scott, Adrian Newman and Robin Sykes, all of whom bring a wealth of experience. We have continued to benefit greatly as an organisation from the support and input of the officers of both the City and County Councils. Our thanks to them for their continued commitment to the success of the Trust. 56943 WCT Annual Report 2012 - 2013 V3.indd 5 05/12/2013 16:31
  5. 5. STRUCTURE, GOVERNANCE AND MANAGEMENT The charity is controlled by its governing document, a deed of trust, and constitutes a limited company, limited by guarantee, as defined by the Companies Act 2006. The Trust is a registered charity, number 1112342, and a company limited by guarantee and is constituted under its memorandum and articles amended in March 2010. The trustee board was established from the Chairs and Vice Chairs of the 3 charities that amalgamated on 1st April 2010: Horizon, Westside Worcester and CAP360. The members of the charity each guarantee a sum not exceeding £10 in the event of it being wound up as insolvent. Recruitment and appointment of new Trustees: The Trustee recruitment process is carried out by existing Trustees on behalf of the members of the Trust. The minimum number of Trustees is 3; there is no maximum number of Trustees that can be appointed but current practice is to limit the maximum number to 12 with no more than 4 new Trustees appointed in any one year. Trustees may serve for 3 years after which they may put themselves forward for re-appointment. Induction and training of new Trustees: On appointment, a new Trustee signs a disqualification form to ensure their eligibility to be a trustee. The induction process involves meetings with the Chair and the Trustees, Chief Officer, Company Secretary, Service Development Manager and other staff members as deemed appropriate by the Trustees. An information pack provides a brief history of the Trust, a copy of the Memorandum and Articles, the most recent set of approved accounts, a copy of Charities Commission “Essential Trustee” and copies of any other documents deemed necessary. Governance: All Trustees give their time freely and no Trustee remuneration was paid within the year. Trustees have provided details of all relevant interests and registered them with the Chief Officer. At the start of each Trustee board meeting any possible conflicts of interest have been requested and noted. Where a conflict of interest has existed, that Trustee has withdrawn from the discussion or decision. At the bi-monthly Board of Trustees meeting, Trustees agree the broad strategy and areas for activity for the Trust, including consideration for reserves, risk management, policies and performance. Day to day administration is delegated to the Chief Officer or, in his/her absence, any other staff member or members as deemed appropriate by the trustees. Two sub-committees assist and advise the full board 56943 WCT Annual Report 2012 - 2013 V3.indd 6 of Trustees, consisting of Trustees, staff members and other persons with expertise and knowledge as deemed desirable by the Trust from time to time. The two subcommittees are Finance and Resources, and Business Development, Service Delivery and Monitoring. Staff monitoring and performance: All managers and supervisors have regular 1:1 sessions with their team members, annual appraisals with 6 monthly reviews. Staff collect qualitative and qualitative data from activities and services. This data is then analysed and reported to the Trustees. Risk management: The Trustees have considered the major risks to which the charity is exposed and have reviewed those risks and established systems to manage those risks. The Trustees worked closely with Worcester City Council’s Community Development team and Worcestershire County Council’s Youth Support team throughout the Transfer of Undertaking (Protection of Employment) (TUPE) process which transferred Worcester City Council and Worcestershire County Council staff seconded to the Trust to employment by the charity with effect from 1 September 2012. Specialist advice was provided through Roots HR for HR expertise throughout this process and constructive engagement undertaken with trades unions to ensure a smooth and successful transfer. Objectives and aims: As defined in the Trust’s Memorandum and Articles the objects of the charity are: (i) To promote the benefit of the inhabitants of Worcester City (‘The area of Benefit’) without distinction of age, sex, sexual orientation, race or of political, religious or other opinions, by associating together the inhabitants and the local authorities, voluntary or other organisations in a common effort to advance education, relieve poverty and sickness and to provide facilities in the interests of social welfare for recreation and other leisure-time occupation with the object of improving the conditions of life for the inhabitants of the area of benefit. (ii) To establish or secure the establishment of community facilities and to maintain and manage the same, whether alone or in co-operation with any local authority or other person or body. Ensuring our work delivers our aims The Trust will be locally driven, owned and controlled thus encouraging a community voice, ownership and democratic participation. 05/12/2013 16:31
  6. 6. STRUCTURE, GOVERNANCE AND MANAGEMENT Membership is open to the following persons: Membership shall be open, irrespective of sex, sexual orientation, age, disability, race, nationality, or political, religious or other opinions to: • Individuals aged 18 and above: • Who live within the area of benefit, who shall be known as full members; • Who live outside the area of benefit, who shall be known as associate members. • Individuals under the age of eighteen years, whether living within or outside the area of benefit, who shall be known as junior members; • The Trusts and organisations, whether corporate or unincorporated, (and including branches of national or international organisations) which operate solely or in part within the area of benefit, are voluntary or non- profit-distributing and which wish to support the Objects, which shall be known as affiliated members; • Statutory authorities in whose administrative area the area of benefit lies, which shall be known as statutory authority members. Achievements: Service Delivery: Service Delivery vision: “Through social and personal development WCT will enable children, young people, families and communities to access a wide range of positive opportunities and experiences that will unlock potential, make their voices heard and create a greater sense of responsibility, significance, security and solidarity with others.” This is achieved through: • Supporting families • Promoting achievement and aspirations • Promoting individual and community responsibilities, rights and voice • Recognising the unique and diverse needs of individuals and communities • Improving opportunities and early support • Reaching out to those with fewest advantages • Embracing enterprise 2012-2013 saw huge organisational change take place across WCT. The City and County Council TUPE took place in September 2012 which culminated in a staffing restructure of the Service Delivery team during Oct 2012 – Jan 2013. WCT is not alone in having to manage significant change within a difficult financial climate but we are now on a clear path with clear aims and objectives crucially underpinned by an appropriate culture that will allow for continued development and improvement. 56943 WCT Annual Report 2012 - 2013 V3.indd 7 This year has also seen a new vision, mission and strategic goals being set along with new ways of tracking progress against these targets. One target is to establish itself as a key organisation addressing issues of social and economic inequality within Worcester and its surrounding areas, contributing to greater social cohesion & well-being. WCT have made significant progress against this key objective, particularly through clearly identifying three key Service Delivery themes; Community and Families: Supporting communities and the whole family to identify their own needs and enable them to create their own solutions to live a better life Children & Young People: Children and young people are given the tools and opportunities to become active, responsible and happy members of their community Education, Employment & Learning: Giving people the tools and opportunities to develop their own skills, self-confidence and ability to succeed and achieve To achieve this WCT have worked hard to create a highlymotivated, skilled and professional staff team supported by an expanding team of volunteers, employing the latest IT technology to maximise flexibility and efficiency. WCT has also worked hard to have a much greater and improved profile, both with the local authorities, partner agencies and other community-focused organisations regionally and nationally along with the wider public. WCT continually aspires to have an appropriate level of community representation on its management board and robust channels and processes to ensure that it constantly reflects and responds to the needs of the communities it is serving. This has led to WCT’s Community Consultation “Think it, Say it, Change it” being launched in early 2013 and supporting a WCT volunteer and local resident to become a Trustee of the charity. WCT’s emphasis has been on making a real difference to the outcomes and life chances of those young people, families and communities who engage with our services and activities. This can be evidenced in our new approach to measuring impact through Outcomes Stars and use of new technologies. This past year has also seen WCT develop and branch out into new areas of work such as the launch of Dawn, a community based domestic abuse project that has supported nearly 100 women and their families within Warndon and Gorse Hill alone. WCT were also selected as the local partner by South Worcestershire Clinical Commissioning Group to support Turning Point recruit and train 17 local people to help redesign health services. 05/12/2013 16:31
  7. 7. WCT were selected to become a partner in a national BIG Lottery pilot project ‘Improving Futures’. This project is about redesigning family support services by placing choice and control direct with families through personal budgets that are used to purchase services and support. WCT Catering Services was also launched this year. This service now provides catering for all of WCT activities, external and internal buffets and party packages for WCT customers along with the food for a local nursery that is based at a WCT centre. These new areas of work highlight the importance of WCT looking to develop new income streams and its commitment to deliver new and innovative services and programmes. Other key developments have seen the launch of WCT Job Cafes, offering local people support in CV writing, job applications and job searches. Just over 100 people have accessed this new service with 33 directly being supported back into employment. We have also changed the way in which play services are delivered across WCT sites. By accessing external funding sources and developing stronger partnerships we were able to deliver a new style of community based open access play provision during summer 2012 along with weekend provision. 56943 WCT Annual Report 2012 - 2013 V3.indd 8 WCT has supported the creation of WCT Raiders FC, a community based football and netball club based at KGV. The club has gone from strength to strength both on and off the pitch with 100’s of local people engaged each week. Along with new areas of activity WCT has continued to deliver open access and targeted youth and community provision based around a strong Outcomes Framework. This included: • • • • • • • • • • • • • Open access youth clubs Targeted youth provision i.e. teenage pregnancy, substance misuse, smoking cessation, personal & social development programmes, mentoring, self-esteem and confidence programmes Volunteering opportunities Sports development programmes Residential opportunities Alternative provision for young people who struggle with formal education Social action projects Holiday schemes Play sessions for 5-12 year olds Community cafés, lunch clubs and snack and chats Community led activities and events Older peoples exercise services Family trips 05/12/2013 16:31
  8. 8. Case Study 1: Dawn Project Service User “I joined the DAWN project group after being asked by a friend, and initially thought the group wasn’t for me as I wasn’t being domestically abused, but agreed to go along to support her and have a better understanding of what she was experiencing at that time. I am a reasonably intelligent, strong, outgoing woman raising two great kids as a full-time stay-at-home-mum. I am no sap. I do not cower in corners. I am not “the type” that people imagine as being a victim of domestic abuse and yet prior to starting the course I read some of my friend’s previous coursework and... well, now I know I was! I had overlooked, excused, or denied the abusers previous behaviour. This is especially true when the abuse was psychological, rather than physical. The DAWN project made me realise that the impact of domestic abuse does not end when the abuse stops! It is a safe, non-judgemental, discussion group which reaches out to community members where we live and work and by doing so strengthens informal social networks. It has certainly helped me understand what domestic abuse is, including its prevalence, the common effects and signs of abuse, and the characteristics of a perpetrator. The project leaders are committed to assisting all victims of domestic abuse without prejudice and in confidence and offer one-to-one sessions if required and has a thorough knowledge of what other services are available to victims of abuse. My awareness of the impact of domestic violence and how we respond has certainly been raised. To have such a group like the DAWN project running on my doorstep within the community allows me to feel safe, protected and heard. Community projects like this are much more able to encourage and support people to work together to build, strengthen and transform communities by addressing issues that are important to them. Raising awareness and understanding through education and community development projects such as this may also act as an effective deterrent to future abusers too. I have found the DAWN project so useful that I am now giving up some of my own time to help set up a support group for victims of abuse where we hope to raise funds, have social gatherings and have informative guest speakers and representatives attend to continue the support long into the future.” Case Study 2: Ronskwood Youth Centre Youth Cafe “Our Youth Café at Ronkswood provides a relaxing area for the young people to socialise, interact and enjoy cheap but healthy snacks and drinks. The idea for the Café came from us as the current youth room was very often really busy with different activities and lots of members attending.” “We got together a load of ideas and then applied for funding to our local councillor (who kindly donated £250.00!). This was great as we could buy loads of new equipment for the café and it gives the centre a better feel.” CD, 13, “We have a rota and share the responsibility of preparing and serving the healthy snacks. We are learning lots of skills such as budgeting, food preparation and there are plans to start a small allotment. All the money we make from the café goes to restock ingredients and any profits are used to provide new equipment for the youth club. It’s a place to have fun with your mates and get some nice food!” BW, 13 Quotes from a range of WCT provision: “I heard about the project through my key worker who recommended it to get experience towards my goal of being a youth worker. I’ve really enjoyed the two months I’ve been volunteering, especially as it combines two areas of interest for me – football and youth work” KO, 19, WCT and Barclays ASB Prevention Project Volunteer “I’m really enjoying help plan what is going to happen in the new youth club including the new youth café. I think it will be good for the estate because the old youth club needed doing up, people are helping design this, it’s going to be great!” A, 15 Dines Green 56943 WCT Annual Report 2012 - 2013 V3.indd 9 05/12/2013 16:31
  9. 9. “Since starting my work experience at the youth centre, I’ve learnt a lot about the professional media business and how difficult it is to get a part in it’ I was really lucky to get my work experience here and get a real taste of what it’s like to do a job in the media environment. I also learnt how to control my voice on air and how to speak slowly so people can understand. It has been amazing and I’d love to carry it on in the future”. MP, 14, Work Experience student at St Johns Youth Centre “I’ve attended The Big Lunch in Tolladine for three years now and this year’s has been the best yet by far. WCT should be really proud of what they have achieved, it’s been a great day.” Local resident, Tolladine “I love coming to lunch club, everyone makes me feel happy as I have no confidence but love coming here. Without this I would not come out of my home as I cannot walk very well and have poor mobility.” Warndon lunch club member I’ve been coming to lunch club for 8 years. The staff were my rock when my mum died. They encouraged me to join lunch club even when I said no to going they would pick me up. I now feel part of the community, it helps me to make friends, I love coming. Warndon Lunch Club member Organisation Update: September 2012 staff from Worcestershire and Worcester City Councils were TUPE’d across and a month later a staffing restructure for the delivery team was undertaken. There were no compulsory redundancies but a number of staff took voluntary redundancy. Existing and new staff were recruited to the new posts from December 2012. Existing cultures were identified and needed addressing as WCT went through a period of change management. Whilst the organisation had a reputation of being a nice and friendly place to work the levels of accrued lieu time and sickness rates of staff were not sustainable in the current economic climate. Absence from work alone cost WCT c£25,000 per annum. As a consequence a robust process to manage sickness was implemented which included Back to Work interviews and annual leave bonuses for staff with a zero sickness record. A staff survey revealed high levels of lieu time, so this was addressed ahead of staff being TUPE’d across from Worcestershire and Worcester Council. Following TUPE we consulted with all existing staff on their contract terms and conditions; Unison were involved. Terms were harmonised across 3 separate contract types, especially in relation to sickness benefits and annual leave where there was a range of 21-35 days leave. New contracts of employment were issued with affordable but reduced sickness benefits and annual leave was raised to a minimum of 25 days per annum. In August 2012 the Customer Service team underwent a restructure with a Manager and Co-ordinator based at the hub based at Warndon Community Centre. Seven centres are now available for hire – Warndon, Ronkswood, King George V, The Tolly, Horizon, The Green Centre and St Johns Youth Centre. Lettings income continues to rise with KGV and Warndon bringing in the most income from our external customers. We continue to provide a bookings and management service to St Peters Village Hall. Our partners, Worcestershire Family Intervention Project have their office located at The Tolly Centre and The British Legion have a branch office at Warndon. Also located at Warndon is a day nursery, open 5 days a week, which also offers nursery places for WCT staff. Staff performance is measured by a balanced scorecard RAG system for staff supervisions and sickness stats are produced to track long and short term trends. A recruitment process has been implemented to refresh Board membership which included addressing gaps in skills, experience and diversity. Other volunteers are involved in our many projects e.g. DAWN domestic abuse project and our volunteers have also acted as a pool to recruit staff on permanent contracts and sessional staff on casual agreements. WCT has encouraged staff to pursue their career development through acquiring mentors, taking up internal secondments and embarking on work based qualifications. WCT has continued to improve its communication internally through Board sub-groups, weekly senior management meetings plus regular team meetings and 1:1 staff supervisions. Externally, a new website www.worcestercommunitytrust.org.uk and social networks have heightened its accessibility and visibility from the wider Worcester community. 56943 WCT Annual Report 2012 - 2013 V3.indd 10 05/12/2013 16:31
  10. 10. Worcester Community Trust Report of the Trustees for the Year Ended 31st March 2013 The trustees who are also directors of the charity for the purposes of the Companies Act 2006, present their report with the financial statements of the charity for the year ended 31st March 2013. The trustees have adopted the provisions of the Statement of Recommended Practice (SORP) ‘Accounting and Reporting by Charities’ issued in March 2005. The Charity is constituted as a company limited by guarantee and is, therefore, governed by a memorandum and articles of association (incorporated 3 April 2003). The Articles were amended in March 2010 to define the “area of benefit” as Worcester City. The Charity was incorporated as Communities Around the Park and then changed its name to CAP360 Worcester on 1 September 2005. On the 1 April 2010 CAP360 Worcester took over the operations and charitable activities of Horizon Worcester and Westside Worcester. On 20 April 2010, CAP 360 changed its name to Worcester Community Trust. REFERENCE AND ADMINISTRATIVE DETAILS Trustees R E Berry Charity number 1112342 Company Secretary Mrs T J Chance Company number 4722577 (England and Wales) Auditors The Richards Sandy Partnership Ltd Chartered Accountants Thorneloe House 25 Barbourne Road Worcester Worcestershire WR1 1RU Registered office The Green Centre Gresham Road Dines Green Worcester Worcestershire WR2 5QS Principal address The Green Centre Gresham Road Dines Green Worcestershire WR2 5QS Trustee Mrs P Clayton A J Riaz Ms V Yates J D Argent P R G Chaplin Mrs S A Ellison Mrs L A Casley A C H Scott Trustee Trustee Chairperson Trustee Trustee Trustee Trustee Trustee R I Sykes Miss S Hemming G W Davidge A G Newman Trustee Trustee Trustee Trustee - resigned 31.5.12 - resigned 6.12.12 - resigned 22.1.13 appointed 1.2.13 appointed 1.6.13 appointed 1.7.13 appointed 1.7.13 appointed 1.6.13 Governing document Recruitment and appointment of new trustees The charity is controlled by its governing document, a deed of trust, and constitutes a limited company, limited by guarantee, as defined by the Companies Act 2006. The trustee recruitment process is carried out by existing trustees on behalf of the members of the Trust. The minimum number of trustees is 3; there is no maximum number of trustees that can be appointed but current practice is to limit the maximum number to 12 with no more than 4 new trustees appointed in any one year. Trustees may serve for 3 years after which they may put themselves forward for re-appointment. The Trust is a registered charity, number 1112342, and a company limited by guarantee and is constituted under its memorandum and articles amended in March 2010. The trustee board was established from the Chairs and Vice Chairs of the 3 charities that amalgamated on 1st April 2010: Horizon, Westside Worcester and CAP360. The members of the charity each guarantee a sum not exceeding £10 in the event of it being wound up as insolvent. 56943 WCT Annual Report 2012 - 2013 V3.indd 11 05/12/2013 16:31
  11. 11. Induction and training of new trustees On appointment, a new trustee signs a disqualification form to ensure their eligibility to be a trustee. The induction process involves meetings with the Chair and the trustees, Chief Officer, Company Secretary, Service Development Manager and other staff members as deemed appropriate by the Trustees. An information pack provides a brief history of the Trust, a copy of the Memorandum and Articles, the most recent set of approved accounts, a copy of Charities Commission “Essential Trustee” and copies of any other documents deemed necessary. Leases The Trust leases the following properties in order to carry out its purposes: • • • • • • • The Tolladine Community Centre The Horizon Community Centre The Warndon Community Centre The KGV Community Centre The Ronkswood Community Centre The Green Centre The St John’s Youth Centre Each lease includes a liability for internal maintenance which until 1st October 2014 is limited to £200 for each incident. After that the maximum liability is £1,750 per centre until 1st October 2016 from which date the trust may assume full liability for internal maintenance. The trust currently rents these properties for £1 pa. This will be reviewed on 1st October 2014. Each lease, with the exception of the St John’s lease, commenced on the 1st October 2010 for a term of 30 years. The situation with regard to the lease of St Johns Youth Centre is unclear. The Trust is currently operating it on a day to day basis in line with the Heads of Agreement entered into in 2012. Governance All trustees give their time freely and no trustee remuneration was paid within the year. Trustees have provided details of all relevant interests and registered them with the Chief Officer. At the start of each trustee board meeting any possible conflicts of interest have been requested and noted. Where a conflict of interest has existed, that trustee has withdrawn from the discussion or decision. At the bi-monthly Board of Trustees meeting, trustees agree the broad strategy and areas for activity for the Trust, including consideration for reserves, risk management, policies and performance. Day to day administration is delegated to the Chief Officer or, in his/her absence, any other staff member or members as deemed appropriate by the trustees. 56943 WCT Annual Report 2012 - 2013 V3.indd 12 Three sub-committees assist and advise the full board of trustees, consisting of trustees, staff members and other persons with expertise and knowledge as deemed desirable by the Trust from time to time. The three subcommittees are Human Resources, Finance & Quality and Performance. Volunteers Volunteers are a valuable asset of the Trust. The Trust recognises Volunteering as a two-way relationship as both parties should gain from the relationship. The Trusts volunteer recruitment policy includes the following: • Job descriptions and include the expected time commitment • Compliance with Equal Opportunities and Diversity • Application forms • References and checks such as Rehabilitation of Offenders Act, and Criminal Records Bureau checks where appropriate • Interviews • Payment of expenses • Induction • Support, supervision and an annual review • Training • Complaints • Compliance with the organisation’s policies • Process if the Trust believes the volunteer is unsuitable The Trust actively recruits, trains and supports volunteers. Staff Monitoring and Performance All managers and supervisors have regular 1:1 sessions with their team members, annual appraisals with 6 monthly reviews. Staff collect qualitative and qualitative data from activities and services. This data is then analysed and reported to the trustees. Risk management The trustees worked closely with Worcester City Council’s Community Development team and Worcestershire County Council’s Youth Support team throughout the Transfer of Undertaking (Protection of Employment) (TUPE) process which transferred Worcester City Council and Worcestershire County Council staff seconded to the Trust to employment by the charity with effect from 1 September 2012. Specialist advice was provided through Roots HR for HR expertise throughout this process and constructive engagement undertaken with trades unions to ensure a smooth and successful transfer. 05/12/2013 16:31
  12. 12. Objectives and aims (i) To promote the benefit of the inhabitants of Worcester City (‘The area of Benefit’) without distinction of age, sex, sexual orientation, race or of political, religious or other opinions, by associating together the inhabitants and the local authorities, voluntary or other organisations in a common effort to advance education, relieve poverty and sickness and to provide facilities in the interests of social welfare for recreation and other leisure-time occupation with the object of improving the conditions of life for the inhabitants of the area of benefit. (ii) To establish or secure the establishment of community facilities and to maintain and manage the same, whether alone or in co-operation with any local authority or other person or body. Ensuring our work delivers our aims The Trust will be locally driven, owned and controlled thus encouraging a community voice, ownership and democratic participation. Membership is open to the following persons: Membership shall be open, irrespective of sex, sexual orientation, age, disability, race, nationality, or political, religious or other opinions to: • Individuals aged 18 and above: • Who live within the area of benefit, who shall be known as full members; How our activities deliver public benefit We have referred to the guidance contained in the Charity Commission’s general guidance on public benefit when reviewing our aims and objectives and in planning future activities. Our guiding mission is ‘releasing communities’ potential’, through ‘working together to find the best ways to shape and deliver activities, services and experiences that create a greater sense of community and belonging’ supported by the following values: putting the needs of the community at the heart of everything we do; supporting the empowerment of communities, staff and volunteers to make a real impact; making democratic decisions with integrity; embracing diversity, innovation, enterprise and partnerships; taking responsibility, always improving and being solution focused to become the best we can be; and working together - one team, one aim. We provide public benefit through the provision of facilities and activities in the community centres and services to support local people to meet their potential, particularly those whose life chances may be limited by deprivation. We also provide a base for the support of a variety of groups undertaking educational, recreational and community development activities. Public benefit will continue to be increased through the delivery of a number of new initiatives in the coming year (refer to “Future Developments”). • Who live outside the area of benefit, who shall be known as associate members. • Individuals under the age of eighteen years, whether living within or outside the area of benefit, who shall be known as junior members; • The Trusts and organisations, whether corporate or unincorporated, (and including branches of national or international organisations) which operate solely or in part within the area of benefit, are voluntary or non-profit-distributing and which wish to support the Objects, which shall be known as affiliated members; • Statutory authorities in whose administrative area the area of benefit lies, which shall be known as statutory authority members. 56943 WCT Annual Report 2012 - 2013 V3.indd 13 05/12/2013 16:31
  13. 13. Who used our services The community centres and facilities were used throughout the year by numerous local organisations and clubs, providing a valuable focal point and resource for the local populations. Activities were provided across a wide age range: Youth & Play Activities for children and young people included parent & toddler sessions, dance and drama sessions and targeted projects such as Funky Trunk, a healthy eating programme for teenagers; Community Games, a fun day of sporting and other activities attended by several hundred young people; a Diversity Project aimed at developing cultural understanding; the DAWN project disseminating information about domestic abuse and supporting individuals suffering abuse; a Quit Smoking Campaign in partnership with a local clinical commissioning group; work with the traveller community. Extend - a physical well-being project, and Snack & Chat, which provides nutritious meals at affordable prices within a social context, were provided for people aged 50 plus. The year saw the further successful development of an extensive football project for young people aged from 5 - 16, with professional coaching and providing a structured progression for boys and girls, targeted particularly at those living in areas of highest need. Other activities included an extensive summer play programme in partnership with Worcester Play Council, a community firework event which attracted over 8,000 people and trips for elderly people from disadvantaged areas in Worcester. Some highlights include the continued success of WCT’s domestic abuse service, DAWN (domestic abuse Worcester network) which has now supported 76 victims and 127 children. This year has also seen the launch of Improving Futures, a national pilot working with families using a ‘personalisation’ approach to using personal budgets to meet their own Family Action Plans. As well as delivering new pieces of work WCT continues to deliver high quality youth and community development through the provision of open access and targeted support. This year WCT has: 56943 WCT Annual Report 2012 - 2013 V3.indd 14 • Worked with over 1,200 children and young people and 300 families • Delivered 1,856 sessions for children and young people and 565 community sessions • Given one2one support to over 250 individuals totalling over 4,500 hours • 150 people have accessed WCT Job Clubs with 35 being supported into work. • Run 12 large community events • Circa 53,518 attendances to WCT events and sessions • Supported 1,138 organisations and community groups to use its facilities totalling 9,320 booking • Delivered holiday play schemes for 5-12 yrs olds The future delivery of WCT services will be based on the findings from WCT’s Community Consultation that took place in June 2013, as well as continuing to deliver current services. WCT will also position itself to take on emerging areas of service delivery such as health contracts and NEET’s provision. How our activities deliver public benefit We have referred to the guidance contained in the Charity Commission’s general guidance on public benefit when reviewing our aims and objectives and in planning future activities. Our guiding mission is ‘releasing communities’ potential’, through ‘working together to find the best ways to shape and deliver activities, services and experiences that create a greater sense of community and belonging’ supported by the following values: putting the needs of the community at the heart of everything we do; supporting the empowerment of communities, staff and volunteers to make a real impact; making democratic decisions with integrity; embracing diversity, innovation, enterprise and partnerships; taking responsibility, always improving and being solution focused to become the best we can be; and working together - one team, one aim. We provide public benefit through the provision of facilities and activities in the community centres and services to support local people to meet their potential, particularly those whose life chances may be limited by deprivation. We also provide a base for the support of a variety of groups undertaking educational, recreational and community development activities. Public benefit will continue to be increased through the delivery of a number of new initiatives in the coming year (refer to “Future Developments”). 05/12/2013 16:31
  14. 14. ACHIEVEMENT AND PERFORMANCE Financial Review The year has been characterised by substantial progress in developing income-generating capacity, both selfgenerated (lettings and services) and grant-raising, and cost challenges resulting from a number of exceptional circumstances. In comparing this year’s outcome with that of the previous year, it should be noted that the Big Lottery ‘transition’ grant of £110,000 available in 2011/12 was not available for 2012/13. Nevertheless the restructuring associated with transition continued in 2012/13. In the course of restructuring the business for viable operation as a charity, redundancies with a gross cost of £38,236 were incurred; although the Local Authorities contributed £23,920 to this, the charity had to meet £14,316. These staff changes reduced the annual salary bill for the Trust by circa £46,600 (including pension contribution), although the in-year impact was circa £11,000. Delays in arranging the staff transfers from the local authorities meant that the management grant associated with the transfers did not begin to be paid until 1/9/12, a loss against budget of £125,264. Whilst the delay also meant that the local authorities continued to pay the related salaries until 1/9/12, the related saving to the Trust was an estimated £104,700 - a difference of £20,564, a difference to which the Local Authorities contributed £10,000. The Trust also wrote-off certain capitalised landscaping and equipment costs, purchased for one of the three pre-existing charities that merged to become WCT. Consequently, depreciation for the next financial year (2013/14) will be £8,670, excluding new items - a difference of £14,561 against this year’s charge. Additionally, the hard winter and cold spring contributed to a 19% increase in gas and electricity consumption from £49,594 (2011/12) to £62,371. Bearing in mind that all supply contract prices for the year were fixed at the same rate or lower than the previous year, substantially all of the increase can be attributed to extreme weather factors. The gross in-year costs of these exceptional items totalled £86,138 towards which the Local Authorities contributed £33,920 leaving the Trust to carry £52,218. Although these factors contributed significantly to this year’s reduction in reserves, the underlying ongoing financial health of the Trust has been significantly strengthened by the structural changes and the resulting increased operational efficiency. The full annual value of these changes indicate that, other things being equal, 2014 could be expected to be over £84,000 better than 2013. Youth and Community work and a contribution towards Management costs. These have an annual value of £471,000 and represent secure income until March 2015. Post year end events General and Centre Management support from the Local Authorities fell from a total of £114,061 in 2012/13 to an annual rate of £72,130 in 2013/14. Cost savings continue to be made through strict controls on expenditure and recruitment and thus, despite the reduction in support, management accounts show a surplus of around £7,000 in the first quarter together with a projected outcome that should enable a contribution of £43,000 towards rebuilding the reserves to be made by the year end. The financial sub-committee has been strengthened by the addition of a Trustee with considerable experience in this role. The Trust’s management team has been strengthened by the appointment of an interim CEO with a demonstrable record of success in delivering sustainable improvements to third sector organisations such as this Trust. Reserves policy The trustees aim to raise free reserves in unrestricted funds to a level that equates to a minimum of 3 months of unrestricted charitable expenditure. The trustees consider that this level will provide sufficient funds available to cover variations in staffing and governance costs. At the end of March 2013, the balance held as unrestricted funds was £55,638 against a budgeted 3 month average spend of £200,981 in 2013/14. As noted above, the Trustees expect to be able to restore the reserves to around £100,000 by the end of March 2014 and will seek further strengthening in 2014/5. Investment policy and objectives The charity does not, currently, have any investment policy or strategy as it does not enjoy the luxury of significant “free” reserves. As the charity develops the trustees will monitor funds and take advice, when appropriate, in respect of investment strategies. Whilst making these structural changes, the underlying business succeeded in growing its letting revenues from £134,667(2011/12) to £175,889 and net revenues from special projects and activities from circa £11,750(2011/12) to circa £24,000. Service Level Agreements with the City and the County covering 56943 WCT Annual Report 2012 - 2013 V3.indd 15 05/12/2013 16:31
  15. 15. FUTURE DEVELOPMENTS During this period Worcester Community Trust has completed negotiations with Worcester City Council leading to the signing of leases for the six community centres and a three-year management agreement for St John’s Youth Centre, has undertaken a TUPE transfer to the Trust employment of staff from both Worcester City Council and Worcestershire County Council and undertaken a full re-structuring of Trust staff. The Trust can now look forward to a period of relative stability as it enters the second year of three-year Service Level Agreements with the two councils. Planning for a future beyond the current contracts requires the trust to analyse existing areas of work to measure their fitness for purpose, impact and sustainability, whilst exploring new potential avenues of income that will enable the organisation to reduce its reliance on the local authority funding. While there is every confidence that the Trust will be well placed to secure future contracts with Worcester City Council and Worcestershire County Council to deliver the same or similar services, the downward pressure on local government funding suggests that levels of funding on offer will be lower. The earliest firm indication of likely levels of funding for which we might bid will be December, 2013. The Trust is examining a number of possible scenarios and preparing a longer term strategy. Resources will be devoted over the next two years to sector-research, capacity-building and the development of partnerships to optimise the Trust’s position to successfully bid for a wide range of commissions. Development of a commercial strategy will also be of key importance over the next period. The Trust will continue to expand lettings in the centres, building on the above-target growth achieved in 2012/13; significant capacity still exists to substantially grow this area of business. Future strategic development will be predicated on the desirability of diversifying income streams and reducing reliance on the two service level contracts with Worcester City Council and Worcestershire County Council; at this point in time a mix of income generated through the Trust’s own activities and a portfolio of contracts and commissions from a range of sources would appear to be the ideal outcome to ensure long-term viability. STATEMENT OF TRUSTEES RESPONSIBILITIES the financial statements in accordance with applicable law and United Kingdom Accounting Standards (United Kingdom Generally Accepted Accounting Practice). Company law requires the trustees to prepare financial statements for each financial year which give a true and fair view of the state of affairs of the charitable company and of the incoming resources and application of resources, including the income and expenditure of the charitable company for that period. In preparing those financial statements, the trustees are required to • Select suitable accounting policies and then apply them consistently; • Observe the methods and principles in the Charity SORP; • Make judgements and estimates that are reasonable and prudent; • Prepare the financial statements on the going concern basis unless it is inappropriate to presume that the charitable company will continue in business. The trustees are responsible for keeping proper accounting records which disclose with reasonable accuracy at any time the financial position of the charitable company and to enable them to ensure that the financial statements comply with the Companies Act 2006. They are also responsible for safeguarding the assets of the charitable company and hence for taking reasonable steps for the prevention and detection of fraud and other irregularities. In so far as the trustees are aware: • there is no relevant audit information of which the charitable company’s auditors are unaware; and • the trustees have taken all steps that they ought to have taken to make themselves aware of any relevant audit information and to establish that the auditors are aware of that information. AUDITORS The auditors, The Richards Sandy Partnership Ltd, will be proposed for re-appointment at the forthcoming Annual General Meeting. The trustees (who are also the directors of Worcester Community Trust for the purposes of company law) are responsible for preparing the Report of the Trustees and ON BEHALF OF THE BOARD: ................................................... Ms V Yates - Trustee 56943 WCT Annual Report 2012 - 2013 V3.indd 16 Date: ............................................. 05/12/2013 16:31
  16. 16. We have audited the financial statements of Worcester Community Trust for the year ended 31st March 2013 on pages nine to sixteen. The financial reporting framework that has been applied in their preparation is applicable law and the Financial Reporting Standard for Smaller Entities (effective April 2008) (United Kingdom Generally Accepted Accounting Practice applicable to Smaller Entities). This report is made solely to the charitable company’s members, as a body, in accordance with Chapter 3 of Part 16 of the Companies Act 2006. Our audit work has been undertaken so that we might state to the charitable company’s members those matters we are required to state to them in an auditors’ report and for no other purpose. To the fullest extent permitted by law, we do not accept or assume responsibility to anyone other than the charitable company and the charitable company’s members as a body, for our audit work, for this report, or for the opinions we have formed. Respective responsibilities of trustees and auditors As explained more fully in the Statement of Trustees Responsibilities set out on page seven, the trustees (who are also the directors of the charitable company for the purposes of company law) are responsible for the preparation of the financial statements and for being satisfied that they give a true and fair view. Our responsibility is to audit and express an opinion on the financial statements in accordance with applicable law and International Standards on Auditing (UK and Ireland). Those standards require us to comply with the Auditing Practices Board’s Ethical Standards for Auditors. Scope of the audit of the financial statements An audit involves obtaining evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements sufficient to give reasonable assurance that the financial statements are free from material misstatement, whether caused by fraud or error. This includes an assessment of: whether the accounting policies are appropriate to the charitable company’s circumstances and have been consistently applied and adequately disclosed; the reasonableness of significant accounting estimates made by the trustees; and the overall presentation of the financial statements. In addition, we read all the financial and non-financial information in the Report of the Trustees to identify material inconsistencies with the audited financial statements. If we become aware of any apparent material misstatements or inconsistencies we consider the implications for our report. 56943 WCT Annual Report 2012 - 2013 V3.indd 17 Opinion on financial statements In our opinion the financial statements: • Give a true and fair view of the state of the charitable company’s affairs as at 31st March 2013 and of its incoming resources and application of resources, including its income and expenditure, for the year then ended; • have been properly prepared in accordance with United Kingdom Generally Accepted Accounting Practice; and • have been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Companies Act 2006. Opinion on other matter prescribed by the Companies Act 2006 In our opinion the information given in the Report of the Trustees for the financial year for which the financial statements are prepared is consistent with the financial statements. Matters on which we are required to report by exception We have nothing to report in respect of the following matters where the Companies Act 2006 requires us to report to you if, in our opinion: • adequate accounting records have not been kept or returns adequate for our audit have not been received from branches not visited by us; or • the financial statements are not in agreement with the accounting records and returns; or • certain disclosures of trustees’ remuneration specified by law are not made; or • we have not received all the information and explanations we require for our audit; or • the trustees were not entitled to prepare the financial statements in accordance with the small companies regime and take advantage of the small companies exemption in preparing the Report of the Trustees. Rob Richards ACA CTA FCCA (Senior Statutory Auditor) for and on behalf of The Richards Sandy Partnership Ltd Chartered Accountants Thorneloe House 25 Barbourne Road Worcester Worcestershire, WR1 1RU Date: ............................................. 05/12/2013 16:31
  17. 17. 2013 Total Funds £ 59,955 - 525,092 217,463 416,844 189,417 682,600 59,955 742,555 606,261 741,952 5,469 747,421 58,296 58,296 800,248 5,469 805,717 612,415 3,838 616,253 (64,821) Total incoming resources RESOURCES EXPENDED Charitable activities Community wok Governance costs Total resources expended Total Funds £ 465,137 217,463 Incoming Resources Incoming resources from generated funds Voluntary income Activities for generating funds 2012 Unrestricted Funds Restricted Funds £ £ 1,659 (63,162) (9,992) 3,540 (61,281) (3,540) (1,881) (63,162) (9,992) 116,919 55,638 38,582 36,701 155,501 92,339 165,493 155,501 4 Net incoming / (outgoing) resources before transfers Gross transfers between funds Net incoming / (outgoing) resources Reconciliation of funds Total funds brought forward Total funds carried forward 15 2013 FIXED ASSETS Tangible assets CURRENT ASSETS Debators Cash at bank and in hand Creditors Amounts falling due within one year Net current assets Total asset less current liabilities Net assets Funds Unrestricted funds Restricted funds Total funds 2012 Unrestricted Funds Restricted Funds £ £ Total Funds £ Total Funds £ 11 8,920 3,597 12,517 28,053 12 48,230 55,941 5,230 38,334 53,460 94,275 64,946 82,387 (57,453) (10,460) (67,913) (19,885) 46,718 33,104 79,822 127,448 55,638 36,701 92,339 155,501 55,638 36,701 92,339 155,501 13 15 55,638 36,701 92,339 116,919 38,582 155,501 These financial statements have been prepared in accordance with the special provisions of Part 15 of the Companies Act 2006 relating to small charitable companies and with the Financial Reporting Standard for Smaller Entities (effective April 2008). The financial statements were approved by the Board of Trustees on 29th October 2013 and were signed on its behalf by: ............................................. ............................................. Ms V Yates -Trustee Mr R I Sykes -Trustee 56943 WCT Annual Report 2012 - 2013 V3.indd 18 05/12/2013 16:31
  18. 18. Notes to the Financial Statements for the Year Ended 31st March 2013 1. ACCOUNTING POLICIES ACCOUNTING CONVENTION The financial statements have been prepared under the historical cost convention, and in accordance with the Financial Reporting Standard for Smaller Entities (effective April 2008), the Companies Act 2006 and the requirements of the Statement of Recommended Practice, Accounting and Reporting by Charities. INCOMING RESOURCES All incoming resources are included on the Statement of Financial Activities when the charity is legally entitled to the income and the amount can be quantified with reasonable accuracy. RESOURCES EXPENDED Expenditure is accounted for on an accruals basis and has been classified under headings that aggregate all cost related to the category. Where costs cannot be directly attributed to particular headings they have been allocated to activities on a basis consistent with the use of resources. ALLOCATION AND APPORTIONMENT OF COSTS Most expenditure is allocated directly to the fund to which it relates. General overheads are recharged to funds via a management fee which is determined by the trustees, dependent on the project. TANGIBLE FIXED ASSETS Depreciation is provided at the following annual rates in order to write off each asset over its estimated useful life. From 2013-2014, new assets with a value of less than £1,000 will not be capitalised. TAXATION The charity is exempt from corporation tax on its charitable activities. FUND ACCOUNTING Unrestricted funds can be used in accordance with the charitable objectives at the discretion of the trustees. Restricted funds can only be used for particular restricted purposes within the objects of the charity. Restrictions arise when specified by the donor or when funds are raised for particular restricted purposes. Further explanation of the nature and purpose of each fund is included in the notes to the financial statements. PENSION COSTS AND OTHER POST-RETIREMENT BENEFITS The charitable company operates a defined benefit pension scheme for 5 employees transferred from Local Authority employment. No other pension scheme is currently operated. Contributions payable to the pension scheme are charged to the Statement of Financial Activities in the period to which they relate. 56943 WCT Annual Report 2012 - 2013 V3.indd 19 05/12/2013 16:31
  19. 19. 2. VOLUNTARY INCOME 5. SUPPORT COSTS 2013 Grants £ 525,092 £ 416,844 Grants received, included in the above, are as follows: 2013 LA grants and contracts (2012) LA grants and contracts (2013) - Youth Community Redundancy Management grant Centre support Contribution to TUPE delay Small project specific costs Big Lottery Fund - Transition Big Lottery Fund Improving Futures Worcester Play Council Barclays Space for Sports Santander Foundation Community Development Foundation Perdiswell Young Peoples Leisure Club Turning Point West Mercia Police Co-operative Foundation Worcester Community Housing Birmingham City Council Nunnery Wood High School Job Centre Plus 291,799 128,333 - 103,341 19,247 42,076 71,985 10,000 70,624 - 110,000 35,340 - 15,559 7,031 5,609 8,890 - 4,624 - 4,420 - 2,500 1,500 1,000 960 500 443 525,092 1,915 1,200 3,040 416,844 3. ACTIVITIES FOR GENERATING FUNDS 2012 £ £ 185,796 15,981 14,936 750 217,463 134,677 18,150 28,688 7,902 189,417 4. CHARITABLE ACTIVITIES COSTS Direct costs Support costs Totals £ 352,253 56943 WCT Annual Report 2012 - 2013 V3.indd 20 Community work Total activities Wages Rates and water Insurance Light and heat Telephone Postage and stationery Advertising Catering and hospitality £ 223,320 4,976 6,581 61,396 11,646 206 2,950 3,906 £ 175,714 8,245 10,369 49,594 11,582 306 9,882 5,426 Training 1,083 2,906 Travel and subsistence Licences and subscriptions Computer costs Cleaning and repairs Payroll processing costs Photocopier costs Consultancy fees Redundancy Depreciation of fixtures & fittings 2,336 4,779 19,782 29,415 1,922 6,993 5,237 38,236 23,231 447,995 3,680 3,429 28,492 27,352 1,831 2,757 28,117 369,682 6. GOVERNANCE COSTS 2013 Accountancy Auditors’ remuneration 2012 £ £ 3,894 1,575 5,469 2,338 1,500 3,838 7. NET INCOMING/(OUTGOING) RESOURCES 2013 Room hire Subscriptions and activities Recharges Other grants and donations 5. SUPPORT COSTS - continued £ - £ 447,995 Community work 2012 £ Community work Management and administration 2012 £ 447,995 800,248 Net resources are stated after charging/(crediting): 2013 Auditors’ remuneration Depreciation - owned assets 2012 £ 1,575 23,231 £ 1,500 28,117 8. TRUSTEES’ REMUNERATION AND BENEFITS There were no trustees’ remuneration or other benefits for the year ended 31st March 2013 nor for the year ended 31st March 2012. 05/12/2013 16:31
  20. 20. TRUSTEES’ EXPENSES There were no trustees’ expenses paid for the year ended 31st March 2013 nor for the year ended 31st March 2012. 9. STAFF COSTS 2013 Wages and salaries Other pension costs 2012 £ 498,204 9,341 507,545 £ 337,635 337,635 There was an average of 48 employees during the year (full time equivalent: 31). No employees received emoluments above £60,000. 10. MATERIAL TRANSFERS Transfer between funds usually relate to management charges to cover overheads. Any transfers to the Capital Equipment Fund relate to assets purchased using grant income from another restricted fund. 11. TANGIBLE FIXED ASSETS At 1st April 2012 Additions At 31st March 2013 DEPRECIATION At 1st April 2012 Charge for year At 31st March 2013 NET BOOK VALUE At 31st March 2013 At 31st March 2012 Fixtures and fittings £ 115,124 7,695 122,819 13. CREDITORS: AMOUNTS FALLING DUE WITHIN ONE YEAR 2013 Trade creditors Social security and other taxes Other creditors Accrued expenses Deferred income 2012 £ 18,614 10,471 1,721 26,647 10,460 67,913 £ 9,730 10,155 19,885 14. OPERATING LEASE COMMITMENTS The Trust leases the following properties in order to carry out its purposes: • The Tolladine Community Centre • The Horizon Community Centre • The Warndon Community Centre • The KVG Community Centre • The Ronkswood Community Centre • The Green Centre Each lease includes a liability for internal maintenance which until 1st October 2014 is limited to £200 for each incident. After that the maximum liability is £1,750 per centre until 1st October 2016 at which date the Trust may assume full liability for internal maintenance. The trust currently rents these properties for £1 per annum. This will be reviewed 1st October 2014. Each lease commenced on the 1st October 2010 for a term of 30 years. 87,071 23,231 110,302 12,517 28,053 12. DEBTORS: AMOUNTS FALLING DUE WITHIN ONE YEAR 2013 Trade debtors Other debtors Accrued income Prepayments 56943 WCT Annual Report 2012 - 2013 V3.indd 21 2012 £ 34,592 4,976 12,654 1,238 53,460 £ 56,275 903 7,768 64,946 05/12/2013 16:31
  21. 21. 15. MOVEMENT IN FUNDS £ Net movement in Transfer between funds funds £ £ At 1.4.12 At 31.3.13 £ Unrestricted funds General fund Restricted funds Worcester District Youth Council Domestic Abuse Working Network Capital Equipment Fund Big Lottery Fund - Improving Futures 116,919 (64,821) 3,540 55,638 5,000 16,667 16,915 - 4,082 (13,737) 11,314 (3,959) 419 - 5,000 16,790 3,597 11,314 Total funds 38,582 155,501 1,659 (63,162) (3,540) - 36,701 92,339 Incoming resources £ Resources expended £ Movement in funds £ Net movement in funds, included in the above are as follows: Unrestricted funds General fund Restricted funds Domestic Abuse Working Network Capital Equipment Fund Big Lottery Fund - Improving Futures 682,600 (747,421) (64,821) 22,192 2,423 35,340 (18,110) (16,160) (24,026) 4,082 (13,737) 11,314 Total funds 59,955 742,555 (58,296) (805,717) 1,659 (63,162) 56943 WCT Annual Report 2012 - 2013 V3.indd 22 05/12/2013 16:31
  22. 22. 16. RESTRICTED FUNDS A description of each restricted fund is detailed below: Capital equipment fund This fund represents grants made for the purchase of capital equipment. The balance on the fund at the year end represents the net book value of the restricted tangible assets shown on the balance sheet. Domestic Abuse Working Network DAWN is a domestic abuse project which provides assistance to women and their children experiencing domestic abuse and provides education and training to raise awareness about this issue and the impact on families and communities. Grants are received from a number of different bodies. Big Lottery Fund - Improving Futures The aim of the Improving Futures programme is to develop more joined-up and earlier support to families with multiple and complex problems. The Worcestershire project will provide support to 100 families in Redditch, Worcester and Pershore, helping them to address the difficulties they face as a result of the inability to access local services. A family worker will work with the families, helping to resolve any immediate family crisis, and developing a family plan to help the family commission the support and services they need to transform their lives. 56943 WCT Annual Report 2012 - 2013 V3.indd 23 05/12/2013 16:31
  23. 23. 2013 £ INCOMING RESOURCES Voluntary income Grants Activities for generating funds Room hire Subscriptions and activities Recharges Other grants and donations Total incoming resources RESOURCES EXPENDED Charitable activities Wages Pensions Cost of trips and activities Governance costs Accountancy Auditors’ remuneration Support costs Management and administration Wages Rates and water Insurance Light and heat Telephone Postage and stationery Advertising Catering and hospitality Training Travel and subsistence Licences and subscriptions Computer costs Cleaning and repairs Payroll processing costs Photocopier costs Consultancy fees Redundancy Fixtures & fittings Total resources expended Net expenditure 56943 WCT Annual Report 2012 - 2013 V3.indd 24 2012 £ 525,092 416,844 185,796 15,981 14,936 750 217,463 742,555 134,677 18,150 28,688 7,902 189,417 606,261 274,884 9,341 68,028 352,253 161,921 80,812 242,733 3,894 1,575 5,469 2,338 1,500 3,838 223,320 4,976 6,581 61,396 11,646 206 2,950 3,906 1,083 2,336 4,779 19,782 29,415 1,922 6,993 5,237 38,236 23,231 447,995 805,717 (63,162) 175,714 8,245 10,369 49,594 11,582 306 9,882 5,426 2,906 3,680 3,429 28,492 27,352 1,831 2,757 28,117 369,682 616,253 (9,992) 05/12/2013 16:31
  24. 24.    WORCESTER Volunteer Centre Together We Can Worcester Community Trust would like to thanks its funders and partners for their continued support. 56943 WCT Annual Report 2012 - 2013 V3.indd 1 05/12/2013 16:31

×