FCSL Business Plan

1,609 views

Published on

Business Plan created to expand athletic-based tutoring program; 2009

0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,609
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
6
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
40
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

FCSL Business Plan

  1. 1. Flower City Academy™<br />Business Plan<br />50768254857750Mollie Foust <br />537210034925Flower City Academy<br />865 W. Main St.<br />Rochester, NY 14611<br />(585) 889-4840 <br />flowercitysoccerleague@gmail.com<br />www.flowercitysoccerleague.com<br />Table of Contents<br /> TOC h z " Heading 3,1" I.Table of Contents PAGEREF _Toc228605790 h 2<br />II.Executive Summary PAGEREF _Toc228605791 h 3<br />III.General Company Description PAGEREF _Toc228605792 h 5<br />IV.Management and Organization PAGEREF _Toc228605793 h 7<br />V.Services PAGEREF _Toc228605794 h 8<br />VI.Marketing Plan PAGEREF _Toc228605795 h 12<br />VII.Plan for Further Action PAGEREF _Toc228605796 h 16<br />VIII.Appendices PAGEREF _Toc228605797 h 17<br />Executive Summary<br />Flower City Academy ™ is a community-based non-profit academic-empowerment program serving urban youth recreational athletes in Rochester, NY. In November 2008, Flower City Academy™ partnered with Flower City Soccer League (FCSL) and the Rochester Parks and Recreation Department to pilot the program in two locations. The Flower City Academy™ curriculum is based on the Search Institute’s 40 Developmental Assets and meets the National Afterschool Association’s Standards for Quality School-Aged Care. <br />The purpose of the Flower City Academy™ is to:<br /><ul><li>Increase youth literacy and math skills, academic achievement and test scores of urban youth recreational athletes
  2. 2. Empower youth to gain self-esteem and the ability to set meaningful goals
  3. 3. Establish positive adult relationships with the youth
  4. 4. Provide a safe alternative during the afterschool hours for youth
  5. 5. Facilitate connections between skills learned through sports and skills needed for academic success</li></ul> <br />What sets the Flower City Academy™ apart from other tutoring and empowerment programs is the integrative and comprehensive curriculum that specifically targets urban recreational youth athletes. A recreational athlete is an individual who participates in a house or recreational sports league, as opposed to a travel, premier, or club team. Recreational leagues are typically open to anyone willing to participate and do not have a try-out process. In the Flower City Academy™, tutors and coaches follow the same curriculum and communicate with one another to support the entire athlete. The fluid program structure could allow for further growth into other local recreation leagues and youth sports organizations, which can adopt and mold the Flower City Academy™ into their pre-existing program structures.<br />According to a 2007 study by the Children’s Agenda, only 230 after school programs served 8,000 children ages 3-17 in Monroe County. That is just 6.2% of youth in that age group. While there is clearly a need for more quality after-school programs, quality is the operative word as many of them do not follow research-based or accredited standards. The Flower City Academy™ is a community-based organization that works within the current systems. An inventory of those Rochester afterschool programs found that 93% of afterschool programs offered some type of athletic activities and 88% offered some form of academic assistance. However none of the academic supports targeted athletes and only 4% of those who participate in sports programs also attended academic assistance programs. These statistics reveal a glaring disconnect between sports and academic and present a need for new mechanisms to be developed to encourage and attract athletes to these academic services. <br />FCSL currently serves over 700 youth ages five to seventeen in every neighborhood of Rochester. The Flower City Academy™ is designed for youth ages 11-12 because that age group shows the most significant drop in academic achievement and test scores. Currently, FCSL has 117 youth who fall into that age range at ten separate locations. By the 2009-2010 season, the Flower City Academy will be active in each of those sites servicing all 117 FCSL youth. The ten sites are: Flint Street Recreation Center, Carter Street Recreation Center, North Street Recreation Center, Baden Street Settlement, #42 School Recreation Center, Webster Avenue Community Center, Avenue D Recreation Center, Monroe YMCA, Bulls Head Gym, and Volunteers of America. <br />The Flower City Academy™ is specifically targeted to the needs of youth recreational athletes. As agreed upon with the FCSL partnership, participation in the Flower City Academy™ is free to athletes who participate in the league. Funding will be secured through grants, in-kind donations, team sponsorships, and other donations. In-kind donations of facilities will be given by the City of Rochester Department of Parks and Recreation, various schools, and neighborhood associations. Additionally, FCSL will host an annual fundraiser “Corporate Soccer Challenge,” with proceeds going to all programs within FCSL including the Flower City Academy™. Start-up costs for the Flower City Academy™ are $113,400.00. This amount includes transportation, tutor training, facilities, tutor and participant recruitment, and educational materials for ten sites. After accounting for in-kind donations, the actual amount of cash needed to start-up at ten sites is $37,200.00. <br />General Company Description<br />Flower City Soccer League (FCSL), a non-profit urban youth soccer league, provides over seven hundred Rochester youth the opportunity to participate in an alternative athletic activity during the afterschool hours. With over forty-five teams in the league, FCSL attracts a wide spectrum of youth from every Rochester neighborhood. As stated in its mission statement, FCSL stresses not only the athletic development of its participants but equally the enhancement of life skills and improvement of academic performance for all players. The Flower City Academy™ is a program currently working within the structure of the larger FCSL organization. The mission statement of the Flower City Academy™ is to connect the skills learned in sports and school through enhancement programs, tutoring, and ethics courses. <br />The Flower City Academy™ will offer services through community organizations, recreation centers, neighborhood associations, schools, and churches that participate in recreational sports leagues. For the first two years, the program will focus on athletes ages eleven through twelve who participate on teams in FCSL. Each subsequent year, the Flower City Academy™ will add age groups and teams until services are available to all participating youth in FCSL. The goal of the Flower City Academy™ is to create an integrated sports-empowerment program and become a leader in youth athletics, academic and character-building services. In achieving this goal, Flower City Academy™ will:<br /><ul><li>Increase youth literacy and math skills, academic achievement and test scores of urban youth recreational athletes
  6. 6. Empower youth to gain self-esteem and the ability to set meaningful goals
  7. 7. Establish positive adult relationships with the youth
  8. 8. Provide a safe alternative during the afterschool hours for youth
  9. 9. Facilitate connections between skills learned through sports and skills needed for academic success</li></ul>Creating a comprehensive, attractive, and effective program is the most important aspect of the Flower City Academy™. Parents, youth, tutors, and coaches must feel comfortable with the program and participate in improvements and strategic plans. Afterschool programming is a booming industry as more research is done of the positive affects afterschool programs have on juvenile violence, teen pregnancy, academic achievement, and self-esteem. Furthermore, childhood obesity and health are currently hot topics so more pressure is being placed on organizations to provide athletic-based afterschool programs. Flower City Academy™ is in a prime situation for engaging both of these focus areas because it facilitates the interaction between structured physical activity, academic assistance, and ethics/character building. <br />The Flower City Academy™ will engage in a three-phase marketing plan:<br />Phase I: Internal Marketing—This phase will consist of marketing within FCSL to parents, <br /> youth, and recreational centers<br />Phase II: Partnerships: In this phase, Flower City Academy™ will expand the program to new <br /> leagues and organizations throughout the city.<br />Phase III: Corporate Sponsorship: The final stage will be a city-wide, corporate marketing <br /> strategy for team sponsorships, tutors, and equipment. <br />Flower City Academy™ is dedicated to the enhancement of current urban athletic programs. Although there are hundreds of afterschool programs in Rochester that attempt to increase academic achievement or provide fun activities for kids, none exist which successfully bridge the skills learned in both aspects of life. By acknowledging these connections and specifically targeting urban youth athletes, the Flower City Academy™ will have greater impact on all aspects of the youth’s life than separate activities. <br />Management and Organization<br />The success of the Flower City Academy™ relies on a strong and effective team. The initial partnership with FCSL provides a foundational management structure for the program, however additional personnel are needed for volunteer management. The following people are key players:<br />Mollie Foust, Founder and Executive Director of Flower City Academy™<br />Mollie Foust is the founder and acting director of the Flower City Academy™ program. She will oversee the implementation of the program at each site, help with recruitment and training of tutors, and provide support and evaluation for all aspects of the program. She successfully completed a pilot of the program at three locations in April 2009 and is a graduate of the University of Rochester. Foust is also a voracious grant writer and has written several proposals for local foundations. <br />Jason Perry, Executive Director FCSL<br />Jason Perry, a former Rochester Rhinos player, will work with Mollie Foust to recruit teams for participation in the program and maintain strong communication between the coaches and the tutors. He has been the Executive Director for FCSL for 2 years and is eager to develop the youth development side of the league. Perry will also assist the Flower City Academy in marketing and identifying appropriate funding sources.<br />Debbie Torres, Office Assistant<br />Debbie Torres is responsible for organizing paperwork, making phone calls, and is essential for the healthy functioning of the organization. She has worked with FCSL for over three years and has agreed to adopt the Flower City Academy™ into her duties. <br />Carolyn Niehaus, Marketing Director<br />Carolyn Niehaus worked closely with Mollie Foust as a tutor in the pilot programs. She deeply understands the demographics and needs of the tutor target population as well as the needs of the program and is responsible for successfully marketing the program to local colleges as well as community members. Niehaus’ BA in English will enable her to write press releases, provide marketing materials, and assist in grant-writing for the program. <br />Ryan Sullivan, Finance Director<br />Ryan Sullivan holds degrees in Economics and Finance from the University of Rochester and will be responsible for maintaining sound financial records for the Flower City Academy™. He worked closely with Jason Perry and Mollie Foust during the pilot programs and is extremely familiar with non-profit and sports management. <br />College Interns<br />College interns will provide support for the operational aspects of the program without additional costs. Two interns will be “overseeing” five sites each, making sure tutors complete all paperwork and have adequate supplies. An additional intern will provide website and database support for the program. <br />Services<br />Flower City Academy™ is an academic-empowerment program serving urban youth recreational athletes in Rochester, NY. Through tutoring, ethics and character-building courses, community-service, and a well-developed incentive-program, the Flower City Academy™ will: <br /><ul><li>Increase youth literacy and math skills, academic achievement and test scores of urban youth recreational athletes
  10. 10. Empower youth to gain self-esteem and the ability to set meaningful goals
  11. 11. Establish positive adult relationships with the youth
  12. 12. Provide a safe alternative during the afterschool hours for youth athletes
  13. 13. Facilitate connections between skills learned through sports and skills needed for academic success</li></ul>The Flower City Academy™ curriculum is based on the Search Institute’s 40 Developmental Assets. What sets the Flower City Academy™ apart from other tutoring and empowerment programs is the integrative and comprehensive curriculum that specifically targets urban recreational youth athletes. A recreational athlete is an individual who participates in a house or recreational sports league, as opposed to a travel, premier, or club team. Recreational leagues are usually open to anyone willing to participate and do not have a try-out process. <br />Flower City Academy™ chose to partner with FCSL because 1) it provides soccer instruction year round, 2) youth ranging in age from 4-17 are eligible to participate, 3) has a 15-year foundation including strong partnerships with the Rochester Department of Parks and Recreation, 4) part of the league’s mission is to enhance the life-skills and academic performance of participants. Past efforts by FCSL to improve academic achievement, including highest G.P.A. awards and tutors by-request, have fallen short as evidenced by exceedingly low New York State Test scores in the Rochester City School District. In 2007 alone, only 51% of third through sixth graders in the RCSD performed at grade-level in math on their New York State Tests, and only 45% of the same group performed at grade-level in ELA. In grades seven and eight, the scores drop even more dramatically to 29% passing in ELA and 20% passing in math. These low scores are amplified when compared to the passing rates in other Monroe County districts. In Henrietta, 81% of third through sixth graders performed at grade-level in ELA. Similar achievement levels can be seen in Webster, Brighton, and Pittsford, where the number of third through sixth graders achieving at-grade level in 2007 reached 87%, 89%, and 95%, respectively. <br />Despite the fact that the majority of FCSL teams reside in city recreational centers where academic services may be offered, very few facilities follow curriculums with trained facilitators and only a handful of sports players take advantage of these services. Additionally, some teams are neighborhood or community-based and cannot offer any type of academic assistance to their players. The Flower City Academy™ recognizes these challenges to youth urban sports leagues and offers an enhancement of the pre-existing programs offered by the recreational facilities. Currently, the Flower City Academy™ is in the piloting stage. <br />General Program<br />The Flower City Academy™ will provide high-level academic assistance through one-on-one tutoring, peer-to-peer learning, math and literacy games, and ethics workshops to Rochester recreational athletes. In partnering with FCSL, the Flower City Academy will first pilot the program in the Under-12 division (ages 11-12) of FCSL. This age group was chosen because the Rochester City School District identified seventh grade as the critical year in declining test scores. In adopting the Flower City Academy™, FCSL will achieve the following goals:<br />Develop and implement a twelve-week academic tutoring curriculum for youth ages 8-12 who participate in the FCSL league. <br />Pilot the program in three FCSL locations. The pilots will evaluate the design of the Flower City Academy™ and help aid in the refinement of the program. <br />At the conclusion of the pilot programs, the Flower City Academy™ will implement a seven-year strategic plan that will oriented towards these additional goals: <br />Facilitate the adoption of the Flower City Academy™ in recreational facilities that already provide academic assistance. This will include the training of current staff members as well as a restructuring of the existing programs to include an evidence-based curriculum. <br />The Flower City Academy™ will become a model for Rochester youth sports programs and will share its expertise with other local athletic leagues through community workshops, lectures, and youth-led seminars. <br />Facilities<br />With over 83% of Rochester school-aged children eligible for free or reduced lunch, athletes will not be required to pay an additional fee to their league to participate in a Flower City Academy™ program. However, several in-kind donations will be required of teams wishing to implement the Flower City Academy™ into their program.<br /><ul><li>A location must be identified and paid for by each team. In the case of FCSL, most facilities are donated in-kind through the Rochester Department of Parks and Recreation because they field teams. The facility should be a place the team already goes to or practices and have tables, chairs, lights, and basic storage facilities for craft materials, books, and/or educational materials.
  14. 14. A site-manager must be established at each location to oversee the successful implementation of the Flower City Academy™ program into the pre-existing programs available at the center. </li></ul>Program Outline<br />The Flower City Academy™ program meets three days a week for 1.5 hour sessions. Schools, recreation centers, and community organizations wishing to participate in the Flower City Academy™ program must adopt the Flower City Academy™ model, including the PASS points incentive program, and provide tutoring and ethics options. <br /><ul><li>Ethics/Values Curriculum
  15. 15. Based on “best practices” literature and the Search Institute’s 40 Developmental Assets.
  16. 16. Youth will receive ethics/values classes twice a week at their individual sites as well as every other Saturday morning in a large-workshop format.
  17. 17. Ethics teachers will be recruited and trained from area colleges and industries [more information about how these teachers are trained in following sections].
  18. 18. Tutoring Component
  19. 19. Flower City Academy™ participants will receive individual tutoring from local University students and community members two to three days per week. [more information on how tutors are selected and trained in following sections]
  20. 20. Math and literacy games will be played at each session to improve critical thinking skills and enhance the work the athletes do in school.
  21. 21. Athletic Participation
  22. 22. All youth in Flower City Academy™ must be members of a participating league and is required to follow all rules, regulations, and guidelines for participation in that league.
  23. 23. Practice and games will be once to twice a week at times separate from the Flower City Academy™
  24. 24. Coaches will be volunteers from local recreation centers, schools, churches, parents, and college students.
  25. 25. PASS points incentive program
  26. 26. Participation, Academics, Sportsmanship, and Service
  27. 27. Designed to encourage positive and responsible citizenship among Rochester youth.
  28. 28. PASS points can be awarded to students for a variety of reasons, including attending workshops and tutoring sessions, encouraging peers, positive attitude, controlling the behavior, and exceptional sportsmanship.
  29. 29. Coaches, tutors, ethics mentors, peers, parents, teammates, facilities’ staff and volunteers, and other league-related members can grant PASS points to any registered league player. </li></ul>Youth participate in the Flower City Academy™ program as a team. This structure increases the bonds they feel and helps bridge connections and understanding between teammates. For example, a kid might not be a great athlete on the field but is extremely good at math. Since FCSL (and the majority of other recreational sports) teams are community-based, not school based, most teammates do not attend the same school. Having teammates recognize the positive contributions each person brings to the team, even if they are not the most skilled, help to solidify bonds, increase self-esteem, and reduces conflict among team members. <br />Insurance is covered by the $10 registration fee paid by the athlete to participate in the league each year and is carried by the New York State West Youth Soccer Association. <br />Tutors<br />Tutors are equally important to the successful implementation of the Flower City Academy™ as the youth athletes. Designed to be creative and interactive for both the tutor and the youth, the Flower City Academy™ Tutoring and Ethics Curriculum enables the tutors as well as the youth to recognize their cultural capital and use their strengths to design their own program. The purpose is to take the strengths of each and empower both sides to create something tangible with it. The underlying features of the curriculum are based on the Search Institute’s 40 Developmental Assets as well as the National Afterschool Association’s Standards for Quality School-Age Care. <br />Tutors are recruited from local colleges and universities including the University of Rochester, Nazareth College, SUNY Brockport, and St. John Fisher College. Additional volunteers are found through advertisements on volunteermatch.com, craigslist, and through word of mouth. <br />All tutors are given an intensive half-day training in which they are taught the curriculum, identify their cultural capital, participate in several of the activities, and build connections with each other. Additionally, all tutors fill out risk-management forms that are used to perform background checks on each candidate before they are allowed access to the youth. Refresher trainings will occur during the middle of the program to reinforce particular topics and address issues the tutors may be having. <br />Marketing Plan<br />Market<br />Flower City Soccer League<br />Serves over 700 youth ages 5-17<br />78% African American, 14% Hispanic, 8% Caucasian <br />Over 89% live below poverty line<br />Youth from every neighborhood of Rochester but large concentrations in 14605, 14621, 14611, and 14609 zip-codes (part of Rochester’s crescent)<br />92% male, 8% female (though growing) <br />Market Share: 117 FCSL participants ages 11-12 (16% of FCSL population)<br />Rochester City School District<br />34,000 kids<br />50% of schools at 90% poverty or higher<br />Highest poverty rate among NYS Big 5 districts per capita<br />88% of students are eligible for free/reduced-price lunch<br />Student performance declines between 4th and 8th grade among those who were meeting standards in 4th grades.<br />Target Market Share: 10% total RCSD population in seven years (3,400 youth)<br />Tutors<br />College Students<br />University of Rochester<br />4,500 Undergraduates, 9,300 students total<br />4 recognized official tutoring programs<br />20 varsity sports teams<br />RIT<br />Nazareth College<br />SUNY Brockport<br />St. John Fisher<br />Community members<br />Business people<br />Professional athletes<br />Teachers<br />Retirees <br />Target Market Share: 200 committed and trained tutors in five years<br />Barriers<br />Resistance by Recreation Centers<br />Funding<br />How could the following affect your company?<br />Change in technology—positively: utilization of new technologies to help make connections between academics and athletics<br />Change in government regulations—provide more services through the schools could reduce the need for the tutoring aspect of this program. However, connections always need to be made between academics, athletics, and life-skills<br />Change in the economy—reduced amount of grant funding available<br />Product<br />Features and Benefits<br />Specifically targets youth recreational athletes<br /><ul><li>Based on Search Institute’s 40 Developmental Assets
  30. 30. Meets National Afterschool Association’s Standards for Quality School-Aged Care
  31. 31. Curriculum integrates academics and athletics
  32. 32. Provides structured activity during afterschool hours
  33. 33. Increase youth literacy and math skills, academic achievement and test scores of urban youth recreational athletes
  34. 34. Empower youth to gain self-esteem and the ability to set meaningful goals
  35. 35. Establish positive adult relationships with the youth
  36. 36. Provide a safe alternative during the afterschool hours for youth
  37. 37. Facilitate connections between skills learned through sports and skills needed for academic success</li></ul>Customers<br />Parents<br /><ul><li>Youth
  38. 38. Tutors
  39. 39. Coaches
  40. 40. Other Leagues</li></ul>Competition<br />Table 1: Competitive Analysis<br />FACTORFlower City Academy™StrengthWeaknessCompetitor A (ROC E6)Importance to CustomerProductsComprehensive program: tutoring, ethics, athletics, afterschool supervision, structure, year-roundComprehensive program but summer only1Price$10$352QualityTutors trained extensively Hires education majors, student teachers1Selectionn/an/aService3 days/week for 12 weeks in winter and 12 weeks in summer5 days/week for 6 weeks in summer3ReliabilityVery stable, partnership with FCSLfounder is life-long resident of Rochester and teacher at East High School 2StabilityExtremely b/c FCSL partnershipEstablished in 20052ExpertiseJason Perry, former RhinoMollie Foust, organizational and managerial experience in educationCommitted, fresh ideas, variety of experienceyoungTeacher at East High School3Company ReputationIn 15th year but reputation is so-soOnly in 3rd year but pretty good reputation4LocationBulls Head Gym and across rec centers because reaches tons of kids because we don’t control rec centersSeneca Park Zoo1AppearanceOf FCSL—they had a rocky past Small, grassroots3Sales Methodn/an/aCredit Policiesn/an/aAdvertisingNo history of competitive advertising3ImageOf FCSL—good and bad image currently4<br />The Flower City Academy™ holds the competitive advantage in comprehensive athletic-based tutoring and life-skills training. No other programs offer year-round services to such a large-range of youth in Rochester. <br />Niche<br />The Flower City Academy™ niche market is youth recreational athletes. There are no programs that exist in Rochester that target high-risk youth athletes who do not play scholastic sports. <br />Strategy<br />The Flower City Academy™ will establish a three-phase marketing strategy:<br />Phase I: Internal Marketing—This phase will consist of marketing within FCSL to parents, <br /> youth, and recreational centers<br />Phase II: Partnerships: In this phase, Flower City Academy™ will expand the program to new <br /> leagues and organizations throughout the city.<br />Phase III: Tutor Recruitment: This phase will occur simultaneously with Phases I and Phase II<br />In Phase I, flyers will be produced for FCSL teams that fit in the age-ranges only. The majority of FCSL participants do not have access to email services and as such, most electronic media will not be effective. Flyers will be distributed at Parent Advisory Board meetings, Coaches meetings, and the first few games. Emails will be sent to coaches who can further advertise for the program. Donation information packets will be created for individual team sponsorship. <br />Also in Phase I, tutors will be identified internally through flyers and emails to local University groups, as well as advertisements on volunteermatch.com and craigslist. No large-scale efforts will be made during Phase I to increase the tutoring pool because the numbers of youth receiving services will be limited for the first two years. <br />In Phase II, more extensive marketing techniques will be employed to establish partnerships with new athletic programs in Rochester. Newspaper features, promotions at Rochester Rhinos games and on soccersam.com, and targeted expansion into other sports are some of the means Flower City Academy™ will use. <br />Phase III of the marketing plan occurs simultaneously with the other two phases but focuses specifically on tutor recruitment. Presentations at local colleges and community centers, online advertisements (facebook, volunteermatch.com), targeted mailings, flyers and word of mouth will be utilized.<br />Pricing<br />The majority of the marketing plan includes presentations and word of mouth, so the largest cost is time spent. Printing and mailing costs are included in the operating budget. <br />Plan for Further Action<br />The Flower City Academy’s largest limitation is its lack of sustainability in the first seven years. Being completely reliant on fundraising, donations, and grants is stressful and not effective. Additionally, much of the budget is covered through in-kind donations of recreational centers. Government budget cuts could have impacts on recreational centers and subsequently, the Flower City Academy™. <br />Data analysis of the program will prove to be an invaluable resource because it will allow for the evidence-based program to be modeled in other leagues and other sports. Additionally, research could be published linking the effects such a program has on the academic achievement of high-risk recreational youth. Over the next seven years, the Flower City Academy™ will expand its program throughout the FCSL league and then into new leagues. <br />Partnerships are essential for the success of this program, both in terms of funding as well as time. Possible corporate partnerships can include Kodak, Paychex, Paetec, Xerox, Bausch and Lomb, Rochester Raging Rhinos, Unity Health Systems, Frontier, Wegmans, and Rochester Gas and Electric. Area law firms, small businesses, restaurants, and medical practices are all possible funding sources as well. <br />Appendices <br />Appendix A: Locations and Hours<br />Baden Street Settlement<br />485 N. Clinton Ave., Rochester, NY 14605<br />Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday—4:30-6:00pm<br />Volunteers of America<br />214 Lake Ave. Rochester, NY 14608<br />Monday, Thursday, Friday—3:30-4:30pm<br />Flint Street Recreation Center<br />271 Flint St, Rochester, NY 14608<br />Monday, Wednesday, Thursday—3:30-5:00pm<br />SWAN<br />275 Dr Samuel Mccree Way, Rochester, NY 14611<br />Tuesday, Thursday, Friday—4:30-6:00pm<br />Carter Street Recreation Center<br />500 Carter St, Rochester, NY 14621<br />Monday, Thursday, Saturday—4:00-5:30pm<br />North Street Recreation Center<br />700 North Street, Rochester, NY 14605<br />Monday, Wednesday, Thursday—4:00-5:30pm<br />Monroe YMCA<br />797 Monroe Ave, Rochester, NY 14607<br />Tuesday, Thursday, Friday—3:30-5:00pm<br />Maplewood YMCA<br />25 Driving Park Ave., Rochester, NY 14613<br />Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday—3:30-5:00pm<br />Bulls Head Plaza<br />30 Genesee St., Rochester, NY 14611<br />Saturdays—9:30am-12:30pm<br />Campbell Street Community Center<br />524 Campbell Street, Rochester, NY 14611<br />Monday, Thursday, Saturday—4:30-6:00pm<br />Webster Avenue Recreation Center<br />530 Webster Ave, Rochester, NY 14609<br />Monday, Wednesday, Friday—4:00-5:30pm<br />#42 School Recreation Center<br />3330 Lake Ave, Rochester, NY 14612<br />Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday—3:30-5:00pm<br />Appendix B: Location Agreements<br />We, __________________________, agree to host the Flower City Academy™ in our location at _________________________________________________________________, every ____________________, ___________________, and ____________________ between the hours of ______________________ from the months of November through March for youth ages 11-12 who are registered in the Flower City Soccer League. <br />We also agree to provide a site manager who will be present at each of the meeting times to supervise the tutoring program. <br />Facility Name:__________________________________________________<br />Facility Director: ____________________________ Signature: __________________________<br />Site Director: ____________________________ Signature: ____________________________<br />Site Director Contact Information: _______________________________________________<br />Date: _____________________<br />Appendix C: Search Institute’s 40 Developmental Assets <br />40 Developmental Assets for Middle Childhood (ages 8–12)<br />EXTERNAL ASSETSSUPPORT Family Support | Family life provides high levels of love and support.Positive Family Communication | Parent(s) and child communicate positively. Child feels comfortable seeking advice and counsel from parent(s). Other Adult Relationships | Child receives support from adults other than her or his parent(s). Caring Neighborhood | Child person experiences caring neighbors.Caring School Climate | Relationships with teachers and peers provide a caring, encouraging environment. Parent Involvement in Schooling | Parent(s) are actively involved in helping the child succeed in school. EMPOWERMENT Community Values Youth | Child feels valued and appreciated by adults in the community.Children as Resources | Child is included in decisions at home and in the community.Service to Others | Child has opportunities to help others in the community.Safety | Child feels safe at home, school, and in the neighborhood.BOUNDARIES AND EXPECTATIONS Family Boundaries | Family has clear rules and consequences and monitors the child ’s whereabouts.School Boundaries | School provides clear rules and consequences.Neighborhood Boundaries | Neighbors take responsibility for monitoring the child ’s behavior.Adult Role Models | Parent(s) and other adults in the child’s family, as well as nonfamily adults, model positive, responsible behavior. Positive Peer Influence | Child’s closest friends model positive, responsible behavior.High Expectations | Parent(s) and teachers expect the child to do her or his best at school and in other activitiesCONSTRUCTIVE USE OF TIME Creative Activities | Child participates in music, art, drama, or creative writing two or more times per week.Child Programs |Child participates two or more times per week in cocurricular school activities or structured community programs for children.Religious Community | Child attends religious programs or services one or more times per week. Time at Home | Child spends some time most days both in high-quality interaction with parents anddoing things at home other than watching TV or playing video games.<br />INTERNAL ASSETSCOMMITMENT TO LEARNING Achievement Motivation | Child is motivated and strives to do well in school.Learning Engagement | Child is responsive, attentive, and actively engaged in learning at school and enjoys participating in learning activities outside of school.Homework | Child usually hands in homework on time.Bonding to School | Child cares about teachers and other adults at school.Reading for Pleasure | Child enjoys and engages in reading for fun most days of the weekPOSITIVE VALUES Caring | Parent(s) tell the child it is important to help other people.Equality and Social Justice | Parent(s) tell the child it is important to speak up for equal rights for all people.Integrity | Parent(s) tell the child it is important to stand up for one’s beliefs.Honesty | Parent(s) tell the child it is important to tell the truth.Responsibility | Parent(s) tell the child it is important to accept personal responsibility for behavior.Healthy Lifestyle | Parent(s) tell the child it is important to have good health habits and an understanding of healthy sexuality.SOCIAL COMPETENCIES Planning and Decision Making | Child thinks about decisions and is usually happy with results of her or his decisions.Interpersonal Competence | Child cares about and is affected by other people’s feelings, enjoys making friends, and, when frustrated or angry, tries to calm her- or himself. Interpersonal Competence | Young person has empathy, sensitivity, and friendship skills.Cultural Competence | Child knows and is comfortable with people of different racial, ethnic, and cultural backgrounds and with her or his own cultural identity.Resistance Skills | Child can stay away from people who are likely to get her or him in trouble and is able to say no to doing wrong or dangerous things.Peaceful Conflict Resolution | Child seeks to resolve conflict nonviolently.POSITIVE IDENTITY Personal Power | Child feels he or she has some influence over things that happen in her or his life.Self-Esteem | Child likes and is proud to be the person that he or she is.Sense of Purpose | Child sometimes thinks about what life means and whether there is a purpose for her or his life.Positive View of Personal Future | Child is optimistic about her or his personal future.<br />Appendix D: NAA Standards for Quality School-Aged Care<br />Human Relationships<br />Staff relate to all children and youth in positive ways.<br />Staff respond appropriately to the individual needs of children and youth. <br />Staff encourage children and youth to make choices and to become more responsible.<br />Staff interact with children and youth to help them learn. <br />Staff use positive techniques to guide the behavior of children and youth.<br />Children and youth generally interact with each other in positive ways. <br />Staff and families interact with each other in positive ways.<br />Staff work well together to meet the needs of children and youth.<br />Indoor Environments<br />The program’s indoor space meets the needs of children and youth.<br />The indoor space allows children and youth to take initiative and explore their interests.<br />Outdoor Environments<br />The outdoor play area meets the needs of children and youth, and equipment allows <br />Activities<br />The daily schedule is flexible, and it offers enough security, independence, and stimulation to meet the needs of all children and youth.<br />Children and youth can choose from a wide variety of activities.<br />Activities reflect the mission of the program and promote the development of all the children and youth in the programs.<br />There are sufficient materials to support program activities.<br />Safety, Health & Nutrition<br />The safety and security of children and youth are protected.<br />The program provides an environment that protects and enhances the health of children and youth.<br />The program staff try to protect and enhance the health of children and youth.<br />Children and youth are carefully supervised to maintain safety.<br />The program serves foods and drinks that meet the needs of children and youth.<br />Administration<br />Staff/child ratios and group sizes permit the staff to meet the needs of children and youth.<br />Children and youth are supervised at all times.<br />Staff support families’ involvement in the program.<br />Staff, families, and schools share important information to support the well being of children and youth.<br />The program builds links to the community.<br />The indoor space meets the needs of the staff.<br />The outdoor space is large enough to meet the needs of children, youth, and staff.<br />Staff, children, and youth work together to plan and implement suitable activates which are consistent with the program’s philosophy.<br />Program policies and procedures are in place to protect the safety of the children and youth.<br />Program policies exist to protect and enhance the health of all children and youth.<br />All staff are professionally qualified to work with children and youth.<br />Staff (paid, volunteer and substitute) are given orientation to the job before working with children and youth.<br />The training needs of the staff are assessed, and training is relevant to the responsibilities of each job. <br />Staff receive appropriate support to make their work experience positive.<br />The administration provides sound management of the program.<br />Program policies and procedures are responsive to the needs of the children, youth, and families in the community<br />Appendix E: Bulls Head Pictures<br />Appendix F: Tutoring Pictures<br />Appendix G: Financials<br />

×