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Power Supply & Demand<br />Tony Ramunno<br />Director, Engineering & Project Management  <br />Great River Energy<br />
Great River Energy<br />G&T Cooperative<br />28 Member Cooperatives <br />Customer Interface<br />634,000 Members (Owners)...
Great River Energy<br />Service area covers 60% of Minnesota<br />Nearly 850 employees<br /> (in MN and ND)<br />2,800 MW ...
          Overview of Presentation<br />Generation types/cost/application<br />Power Delivery – Transmission<br />Correlat...
Introduction<br />Electricity Is not Magic <br />Can’t be stored/warehoused<br />Ordered, Manufactured, and delivered “on-...
Power Generation<br />The Lowest Cost Plant is the one not built!<br />
Matching Generation & Load Types<br />Unpredictable or added to high Load timeframe  <br />High Cost  Generation<br />Cycl...
Power Delivery System OverviewTransmission Must Cover “peak load”<br />Generating<br />Plants<br />Purchased<br />Power<br...
Typical Utility Demand Curve<br />
Ideal Load Curve!<br />
What Can We Do!<br />Understand/manage process energy usage<br />Energize/de-energize frequency/duration<br />Staging star...
Working Together<br />Collaborate with Electric Utility<br />Time of day or time of year load benefits<br />On-site emerge...
Questions<br />
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Maximize Minnesota Power Supply And Demand Presentation February 2010

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Power Supply & Demand, presentation given by Tony Ramunno, Director, Engineering & Project Management for Great River Energy.
Presented at the February 18, 2010 Maximize Minnesota event held at South Central College, North Mankato, MN

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Maximize Minnesota Power Supply And Demand Presentation February 2010

  1. 1. Power Supply & Demand<br />Tony Ramunno<br />Director, Engineering & Project Management <br />Great River Energy<br />
  2. 2. Great River Energy<br />G&T Cooperative<br />28 Member Cooperatives <br />Customer Interface<br />634,000 Members (Owners)<br />Sales: <br />57.4% Residential <br />40.2% Commercial and Industrial, Agriculture<br />2.4% Seasonal<br />5th largest G&T in nation<br />Second largest utility in Minnesota<br />Tony Ramunno - Director Engineering & Project Management - Transmission<br />
  3. 3. Great River Energy<br />Service area covers 60% of Minnesota<br />Nearly 850 employees<br /> (in MN and ND)<br />2,800 MW of generation<br />4,500 miles of transmission lines<br />Total assets: $2.3 billion<br />
  4. 4. Overview of Presentation<br />Generation types/cost/application<br />Power Delivery – Transmission<br />Correlation of load to electrical infrastructure<br />What can we do!<br />
  5. 5. Introduction<br />Electricity Is not Magic <br />Can’t be stored/warehoused<br />Ordered, Manufactured, and delivered “on-demand”<br />Electricity usage and production costs are directly related!<br />Infrastructure must be built to accommodate “peak demand”<br />Assets are expensive ($$ and lead time)<br />Users of electricity share the cost<br />
  6. 6. Power Generation<br />The Lowest Cost Plant is the one not built!<br />
  7. 7. Matching Generation & Load Types<br />Unpredictable or added to high Load timeframe <br />High Cost Generation<br />Cycling, Seasonal, other predictable Load<br />ContinuousLoad<br />Low Cost Generation<br />
  8. 8. Power Delivery System OverviewTransmission Must Cover “peak load”<br />Generating<br />Plants<br />Purchased<br />Power<br />Power is generated or purchased<br />Bulk transmission (DC line and &gt;115kv) moves the power to transmission substations, allows reserve sharing, and integrates resources into a regional grid<br />Bulk<br />Transmission<br />Bulk<br />Transmission<br />Substation<br />These substations drop the voltage down<br />Load serving transmission (&lt;115kv) moves the power to distribution substations<br />Load Serving<br />Transmission<br />distribution substations drop the voltage down<br />Distribution<br />Substations<br />Distribution Lines<br />distribution lines move the power to the end customer.<br />
  9. 9. Typical Utility Demand Curve<br />
  10. 10. Ideal Load Curve!<br />
  11. 11. What Can We Do!<br />Understand/manage process energy usage<br />Energize/de-energize frequency/duration<br />Staging starts/stops to levelize load<br />Consider energy in utilization equation<br />Is there operational flexibility?<br />Can facility load be shifted to off-peak times?<br />Consider energy in equipment selection<br />Energy efficiency – upfront vs. lifetime costs<br />
  12. 12. Working Together<br />Collaborate with Electric Utility<br />Time of day or time of year load benefits<br />On-site emergency generation capabilities<br />Load shedding or other flexibility during times of emergency<br />We all share the costs for Electrical Infrastructure! <br />We all share the savings of deferred/delayed infrastructure!<br />
  13. 13. Questions<br />

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