Energy Efficient LightingEnergy Independence and Security Act (EISA)                               October 12, 2012       ...
Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA)• Signed on December 19, 2007 by President Bush:  • Move the US toward greater ...
Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA)• Three Key Provisions are:  • Corporate Average Fuel Economy Standards  • Rene...
Lighting Technology Options
EISA Energy Efficient Lighting Standards  •   Sets Minimum Energy Efficiency Standards  •   Standards are Phased-In  •   T...
EISA Timeline Summary  • 1/1/2012     (1/1/2011 in CA Only)    • 100W A-Lamp Medium Base    • >60W Decorative Candelabra B...
•   INCANDESCENT HOUSEHOLD BULBS–EISA 2007:•   3-Way bulbs, Appliance bulbs (Maximum 40W), Colored Party bulbs, Black Ligh...
•   Technology neutral•   Reduce energy consumption by 25% - 30%•   Increase energy efficiency of bulbs•   Impacts utility...
Comparison of Lighting Technologies                        (2010)                                     EISA 2020: 45 lm/WPa...
EISA Performance Requirements        CFL                  Halogen  LED
Lamp Selection CriteriaPage 11
Lamp Selection Criteria          Watts = Energy        Lumens = BrightnessPage 12
EISA Impact on Standard Residential A-LampStandard Incandescent    Energy Efficient Halogen
EISA Impact on Standard Residential A-LampStandard Incandescent    Energy Efficient Options
Mercury in CFLs                                                                            900 CFLs     Exposure from wors...
Lighting Technology Options
Predicted versus Actual Progress                                      CFLPage 17
Utility Rebate Calculation with EISA Baseline  •   Incandescent to Halogen  •   Incandescent to CFLs  •   T12 to High Perf...
Questions?                       Richard Szydlowski        Director of Engineering and Business Development               ...
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Energy Efficient Lighting and EISA

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Energy Efficient Lighting and EISA

  1. 1. Energy Efficient LightingEnergy Independence and Security Act (EISA) October 12, 2012 Richard Szydlowski Director of Engineering and Business Development Center for Energy and Environment 212 3rd Avenue North, Suite 560 Minneapolis, Minnesota 55401 Work: 612.335.5862 Mobile: 612.747.6726 email: rszydlowski@mncee.org
  2. 2. Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA)• Signed on December 19, 2007 by President Bush: • Move the US toward greater energy independence and security • Increase the production of clean renewable fuels • Protect consumers • Increase the efficiency of products, buildings, and vehicles • Promote research/deploy greenhouse gas capture and storage • Improve the energy performance of the Federal Government • Increase U.S. energy security, develop renewable fuel production, and improve vehicle fuel economy
  3. 3. Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA)• Three Key Provisions are: • Corporate Average Fuel Economy Standards • Renewable Fuel Standard • Appliance / Lighting Efficiency Standards T5 T8 T12
  4. 4. Lighting Technology Options
  5. 5. EISA Energy Efficient Lighting Standards • Sets Minimum Energy Efficiency Standards • Standards are Phased-In • Timeline: 2011 - 2014 • Applies to Following Lamps: • Incandescent / Halogen Bulbs (General Service, Household, A-Lamp) • Incandescent / Halogen Reflectors • Linear Flourescents (General Service, T12) • Incandescent Lamps Are NOT Outlawed They just have to be more energy efficient Standard Incandescent Energy Efficient Halogen
  6. 6. EISA Timeline Summary • 1/1/2012 (1/1/2011 in CA Only) • 100W A-Lamp Medium Base • >60W Decorative Candelabra Base • >40W Decorative Intermediate Base • 7/14/2012 • 40W to 205W Reflector Flood/Spot • 4’ and 8’ T5, T8, T12 Linear Fluorescents • 2’ U-Shape Fluorescents • 1/1/2013 • 75W A-Lamp Medium Base • 1/1/2014 • 40W and 60W A-Lamp • >40W Decorative Medium Base
  7. 7. • INCANDESCENT HOUSEHOLD BULBS–EISA 2007:• 3-Way bulbs, Appliance bulbs (Maximum 40W), Colored Party bulbs, Black Light bulbs, Infrared bulbs, Plant Light bulbs, Sign Service bulbs, Silver Bowl bulbs, Bug-A-Way, and Rough Service bulbs• Post Lights (below 100W) and Nightlights• Specialty Incandescent, Marine bulbs, Marine Signal Service bulbs, Mine Service bulbs, and Traffic Signal bulbs• Decorative Globes G40 bulbs (all wattages)• The following bulbs if less than or equal to 60Watts are exempt: Decorative Candles (B, BA, CA) with Candelabra base• Decorative Globes (G161/2, G25, G30) with Candelabra base• Vibration Service bulbs• The following bulbs if less than or equal to 40Watts are exempt: Specialty Tubular (T-8)• Decorative Candles (B, BA, CA) with medium and intermediate bases• Decorative Globes (G161/2, G25, G30) with medium and intermediate bases• M14• INCANDESCENT REFLECTOR BULBS–EISA 2007: Specialty Light Bulbs•• Colored PARs, Rough Service, and Vibration Service bulbs Exempt from EISA Exemptions are expected to expire in 2014 45W or Less: R20 and BR19• 50W or Less: BR30, ER30, BR40, and ER40• 65W BR30, BR40, and ER40• GENERAL SERVICE FLUORESCENT LAMPS (GSFL)–DOE 2009 RULEMAKING:• All lamps with a CRI = 87• Outdoor use: Cool White High Output (F96T12/CW/HO-O) and Daylight/High Output (D/HO-O)• Shatter Resistant bulbs: TuffGuard• Cool White Deluxe/Daylight Deluxe; Colortone50• Other length bulbs not specifically mentioned (such as 2, 3, and 5 bulbs)• Bulbs >7000 Kelvin that are Plant Growth, Cold Temperature, Colored, Reflector or Aperture, Reprographic, and UV
  8. 8. • Technology neutral• Reduce energy consumption by 25% - 30%• Increase energy efficiency of bulbs• Impacts utility energy efficiency programs
  9. 9. Comparison of Lighting Technologies (2010) EISA 2020: 45 lm/WPage 9
  10. 10. EISA Performance Requirements CFL Halogen LED
  11. 11. Lamp Selection CriteriaPage 11
  12. 12. Lamp Selection Criteria Watts = Energy Lumens = BrightnessPage 12
  13. 13. EISA Impact on Standard Residential A-LampStandard Incandescent Energy Efficient Halogen
  14. 14. EISA Impact on Standard Residential A-LampStandard Incandescent Energy Efficient Options
  15. 15. Mercury in CFLs 900 CFLs Exposure from worst case scenario : 1) you break a CFL in a closed, unventilated room; 2) you vacuum the carpet, throwing mercury into the air; you set the vacuum in a corner; and 3) then sit in the room breathing for eight hours — the amount of mercury exposure is about equivalent to the exposure you’d get from eating a can of Albacore tuna. From research paper by Robert Clear, Francis Rubinstein, and Jack Howells, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)Page 15
  16. 16. Lighting Technology Options
  17. 17. Predicted versus Actual Progress CFLPage 17
  18. 18. Utility Rebate Calculation with EISA Baseline • Incandescent to Halogen • Incandescent to CFLs • T12 to High Performance T8 • Low Wattage Re-Lamp of Standard T8 For Example: • Existing 100W Incandescent (INC) • Max Allowed with EISA = 72W (1,490 to 2,600 Lumen) • Retrofit with 24W CFL • Reportable Savings = 48W (Not 76W) Calculation: 72W (EISA Baseline for 100W INC) – 24W CFL = 48W
  19. 19. Questions? Richard Szydlowski Director of Engineering and Business Development Center for Energy and Environment 212 3rd Avenue North, Suite 560 Minneapolis, Minnesota 55401Work: 612.335.5862 Mobile: 612.747.6726 email: rszydlowski@mncee.org

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