Impact of Window Energy Efficiency and How to Make Smart Choices

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Impact of Window Energy Efficiency and How to Make Smart Choices

  1. 1. 1 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013 Impact of Window Energy Efficiency webinar October 3, 2013 11:00 – 12:00 Hover your cursor at the top of your screen to access the WebEx menu bar and open your Chat box. Technical questions: ajursik@mncee.org
  2. 2. 2 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013 Discovering the next generation of energy SOLUTIONS
  3. 3. 3 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013 PRESENTATION TITLE HERE The Impact of Window Energy Efficiency & How to Make Smart Choices Targeted Audiences John Carmody | Center for Sustainable Building Research University of Minnesota Kerry Haglund | Haglund Design Inc. October 3, 2013 • Design and development professionals • Energy service professionals • Facility management • Utility and energy conservation management
  4. 4. 4 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013 Continuing Education Credits This webinar meets the GBCI requirements for self-reporting continuing education credit. Save an image of the registration page online for your own personal records.
  5. 5. 5 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013 1. Describe the Façade Design Tool and the benefits of using this online tool early in the design process. 2. Compare the performance of a building with a large window-to-wall ratio with that of a small window-to-wall ratio to see the benefits of high-performance windows. 3. Identify and compare the impacts of windows with external shading devices to unshaded high-performance windows. 4. Learn features of the COMFEN user interface and understand its results of energy, peak demand, and thermal and visual comfort.
  6. 6. 6 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013 The Impact of Window Energy Efficiency and How to Make Smart Choices John Carmody Center for Sustainable Building Research University of Minnesota Kerry Haglund, Haglund Design, Inc.
  7. 7. 7 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013 Energy Use Buildings are responsible for 48% of energy consumption. (Architecture 2030) Building operation is responsible for 75% of all power plant-generated electricity. (Architecture2030) 53% of the primary end use of commercial buildings is attributed to lighting, space heating and space cooling. (U.S. DOE, Department of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy) Research estimates that windows are responsible for 39% of commercial heating energy use and 28% of commercial cooling energy use—34% of all commercial space conditioning energy use. This is equivalent to 1.48 quads of space conditioning energy use— almost 1.5% of the total U.S. energy consumption. (Apte and Arasteh, 2006)
  8. 8. 8 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013 Efficient Windows Collaborative Residential Tools and Information • Third edition of book: “Residential Windows: A Guide to New Technology and Energy Performance” • EWC web site: www.efficientwindows.org (reached 230,000 visitors in 2012) • Fact sheets for 100 cities • Education and training materials • Product database for EWC members (NFRC and ENERGY STAR participants)
  9. 9. 9 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013 Measuring Window Energy Performance U-Factor Visible Transmittance (VT) Solar Heat Gain Coefficient (SHGC) The rate of heat loss is indicated in terms of the U-factor (U-value). The lower the U-factor, the greater a window’s resistance to heat flow and the better its insulating properties. The SHGC is the fraction of incident solar radiation admitted, both directly transmitted and absorbed and released inward. SHGC is expressed as a number between 0 and 1. The lower a window’s solar heat gain coefficient, the less solar heat it transmits. The visible transmittance (VT) is an optical property that indicates the fraction of visible light transmitted. While VT theoretically varies between 0 and 1, most values are between 0.30 and 0.80. The higher the VT, the more light is transmitted.
  10. 10. 10 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013 Efficient Windows Collaborative Commercial Tools & Information •Book: “Window Systems for High Performance Buildings” •Web site: www.commercialwindows.org featuring the Façade Design Tool •Education and training materials •Promotion of COMFEN •Promotion of CMA 10
  11. 11. 11 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013 What Makes an Energy-Efficient Window? • Warm-edge spacers • Gas fill • Low-E coating Characteristics of Low-E Coatings Long-wave radiant heat is reflected, giving an improved U-factor and reduced winter heat loss. Higher temperatures on the interior glass surface contribute to greater comfort and less condensation in winter. Visible transmittance is only slightly affected. With high-solar-gain coatings, solar heat is transmitted. With low-solar-gain coatings, solar radiation is reflected back toward the exterior. Characteristics of Gas Fills Thermal resistance is increased with argon and krypton gas fills, reducing winter heat loss and summer heat gain through conduction. Higher temperatures in winter on the interior glass surface contribute to greater comfort and less condensation. Visible transmittance is not affected. Characteristics of Thermally Improved Spacers Overall U-factor is improved because heat loss at the glass edges is reduced. Higher temperatures on the glass edges produce less condensation.
  12. 12. 12 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013 Glazing Types Layers Tints Low-ECoatings
  13. 13. 13 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013 Tools to Determine Window Performance Developed by: Lawrence Berkeley National Lab CGDB (Complex Glazing Data Base) calculationon to stics) calculationcalculationcalculationon to stics) on to stics) calculationcalculation Design / Simulation Tools DOE-2, EnergyPlus Radiance IGDB (Specular Glass Data Source) Optics (Window Glass) RESFEN (Whole Building Residential) WINDOW (Whole Window) COMFEN (Whole Building Commercial) THERM (Window Frame) Optics Analyze glazing optical properties IGDB (International Glazing Database) Database of glazing materials CGDB (Complex Glazing Database) Database of complex glazing materials THERM Analyze two-dimensional heat transfer through building products WINDOW Analyze window thermal and optical performance RESFEN Calculate the heating and cooling energy use of windows in residential buildings COMFEN Calculate the heating and cooling energy use of windows in commercial buildings, as well as evaluating daylighting and thermal comfort
  14. 14. 14 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013 The Façade Design Tool The Facade Design Tool lets you choose the design conditions of a window and rank and compare the performance data in terms of annual energy, peak demand, carbon, daylight illuminance, glare, and thermal comfort.
  15. 15. 15 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013 Façade Design Tool Location: 21 Cities Building Type: Office Zone / Classroom Orientation: North, East, South, West CHOOSE LOCATION & BUILDING TYPE Select a location, building type, and zone orientation from the drop-down lists below. My city isn't listed» "Refine & Explore" first lets you choose the available design parameters then you can refine and explore the ranked results. Use this exploratory method if parametrics are unknown or to determine the optimal design from various scenarios. "Compare 5 Scenarios" lists the design parameters for 5 scenarios for a quick comparison. Use this comparison method if many of the design parametrics are previously determined. Location 6A: MN Minneapolis Building Type Office Zone Orientation South 1 2REFINE & EXPLORE -OR- COMPARE 5 SCENARIOS 1: REFINE & EXPLORE: Use this exploratory method if parametrics are unknown or to determine the optimal performance of various scenarios for a particular orientation. 2: COMPARE SCENARIOS: Use this comparison method if many of the design parametrics (window area, shading, glass type, lighting controls) are previously determined.
  16. 16. 16 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013 *The webinar broke to a web-based demonstration at this time. The following series of slides cover the information that was demonstrated.
  17. 17. 17 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013 Façade Design Tool: Window Area Study
  18. 18. 18 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013 Façade Design Tool: Window Area Study
  19. 19. 19 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013
  20. 20. 20 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013
  21. 21. 21 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013
  22. 22. 22 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013
  23. 23. 23 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013
  24. 24. 24 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013
  25. 25. 25 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013
  26. 26. 26 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013
  27. 27. 27 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013
  28. 28. 28 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013 Façade Design Tool: Shading Study
  29. 29. 29 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013
  30. 30. 30 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013
  31. 31. 31 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013
  32. 32. 32 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013
  33. 33. 33 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013
  34. 34. 34 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013
  35. 35. 35 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013
  36. 36. 36 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013 *The web-based demonstration ended here.
  37. 37. 37 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013
  38. 38. 38 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013
  39. 39. 39 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013
  40. 40. 40 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013 COMFEN For use early in design process to provide design guidance on commercial building façade and glazing options. Graphical and tabular format of results in a simple user interface for comparative designs. Uses EnergyPlus as simulation engine. Zone modeler with 5 building types (office, mid-rise residential, hotel, retail, and classroom). Outputs information on energy consumption, peak energy demand, and thermal and visual comfort Free download at: windows.lbl.gov/software/comfen/comfen.html
  41. 41. 41 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013 COMFEN: Graphical User Interface
  42. 42. 42 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013 COMFEN: Projects
  43. 43. 43 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013 COMFEN: Scenarios
  44. 44. 44 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013 COMFEN: Libraries
  45. 45. 45 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013 COMFEN: Calculate Scenarios
  46. 46. 46 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013 COMFEN: Calculate Scenarios
  47. 47. 47 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013 COMFEN: Compare Scenarios
  48. 48. 48 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013 COMFEN: Compare Scenarios-Summary
  49. 49. 49 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013 COMFEN: Compare Scenarios-Energy
  50. 50. 50 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013 COMFEN: Compare Scenarios-Glare
  51. 51. 51 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013 COMFEN: Other Features • Customize scenarios for comparative analysis • Import and analyze climate data • Import glazing systems (from WINDOW) or design systems within COMFEN • Ability to import project definition from a CSV file • Export results in CSV format • Version 5 integrates limited cost information • Includes dynamic systems (ie: electrochromics)
  52. 52. 52 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013 Sources and Links Center for Sustainable Building Research www.csbr.umn.edu Center for the Built Environment www.cbe.berkeley.edu COMFEN windows.lbl.gov/software/comfen/comfen.html Efficient Windows Collaborative (EWC) Window Selection Tool www.efficientwindows.org ENERGY STAR www.energystar.gov National Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC) www.nfrc.org RESFEN windows.lbl.gov/software/resfen/resfen.html US Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy www.eere.energy.gov Window Installation Water Management Guide by Joseph W. Lstiburek www.eeba.org Windows and Daylighting Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory windows.lbl.gov Windows for High Performance Commercial Buildings Façade Design Tool www.commercialwindows.org
  53. 53. 53 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013 www.efficientwindows.org www.commercialwindows.org Presenter Contacts: John Carmody: carmo001@umn.edu Kerry Haglund: khaglund@umn.edu Find Webinar Recording and Q&A Visit: http://www.mncee.org/Innovation-Exchange/Resource-Center/ Webinar Questions: Megan Hoye mhoye@mncee.org EfficientWindows Efficient Windows Collaborative @EWCwindows PRESENTER RESOURCES
  54. 54. 54 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013
  55. 55. 55 Center for Energy and Environment Innovation Exchange October 3, 2013 Contact & Media Information John Carmody: carmo001@umn.edu Kerry Haglund: khaglund@umn.edu www.efficientwindows.org www.commercialwindows.org www.facebook.com/EfficientWindows www.linkedin.com/groups/Efficient-Windows-Collaborative-4286505 twitter.com/EWCwindows

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