The Columbian Exchange

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The Columbian Exchange

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The Columbian Exchange

  1. 1. The Columbian Exchange
  2. 2. The introduction of beasts of burden to the Americas was a significant development from the Columbian Exchange. The introduction of the horse provided people in the Americas with a new source of labor and transportation. <ul><li>Explorers created contact between Europe and Americas. </li></ul><ul><li>Interaction with Native Americans led to big cultural changes. </li></ul><ul><li>Contact between the two groups led to the exchange of plants, animals, and disease—the Columbian Exchange . </li></ul>The Columbian Exchange <ul><li>Plants, animals developed in very different ways in hemispheres </li></ul><ul><li>Europeans —no potatoes, corn, sweet potatoes, turkeys </li></ul><ul><li>People in Americas—no coffee, oranges, rice, wheat, sheep, cattle </li></ul>The Exchange of Goods <ul><li>Arrival of Europeans in Americas changed all this </li></ul><ul><li>Previously unknown foods taken back to Europe </li></ul><ul><li>Familiar foods brought to Americas by colonists </li></ul>Sharing Discoveries
  3. 4. <ul><li>Different Foods </li></ul><ul><li>Exchange of foods, animals had dramatic impact on later societies </li></ul><ul><li>Over time crops native to Americas became staples in diets of Europeans </li></ul><ul><li>Foods provided nutrition, helped people live longer </li></ul><ul><li>Italian Food Without Tomatoes? </li></ul><ul><li>Until contact with Americas, Europeans had never tried tomatoes </li></ul><ul><li>Most Europeans thought tomatoes poisonous </li></ul><ul><li>By late 1600s, tomatoes had begun to be included in Italian cookbooks </li></ul><ul><li>Economics and Gastronomics </li></ul><ul><li>Activities like Texas cattle ranching, Brazilian coffee growing not possible without Columbian Exchange; cows, coffee native to Old World </li></ul><ul><li>Traditional cuisines changed because of Columbian Exchange </li></ul>Effects of the Columbian Exchange
  4. 5. <ul><li>Effects of Columbian Exchange felt not only in Europe, Americas </li></ul><ul><li>China </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Arrival of easy-to-grow, nutritious corn helped population grow tremendously </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Also a main consumer of silver mined in Americas </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Africa </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Two native crops of Americas—corn, peanuts—still among most widely grown </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Scholars estimate one-third of all food crops grown in world are of American origin </li></ul>
  5. 6. <ul><li>Devastating Impact </li></ul><ul><li>Native American population continued to decline for centuries </li></ul><ul><li>Inca Empire decreased from 13 million in 1492 to 2 million in 1600 </li></ul><ul><li>North American population fell from 2 million in 1492 to 500,000 in 1900—but disease not only factor in decrease of population </li></ul><ul><li>Intermittent warfare, other violence also contributed </li></ul><ul><li>The Introduction of New Diseases </li></ul><ul><li>Native Americans had no natural resistance to European diseases </li></ul><ul><li>Smallpox, measles, influenza, malaria killed millions </li></ul><ul><li>Population of central Mexico may have decreased by more than 30 percent in the 10 years following first contact with Europeans </li></ul>

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