Matter Properties And Changes

49,806 views

Published on

List of physical properties of matter

1 Comment
66 Likes
Statistics
Notes
No Downloads
Views
Total views
49,806
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4,056
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3,407
Comments
1
Likes
66
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Matter Properties And Changes

  1. 1. PROPERTIES OF MATTER 6 th Grade Matter Unit
  2. 2. Characteristic Properties <ul><li>The properties that are most useful in identifying a substance are its characteristic properties. </li></ul><ul><li>Remember the difference between physical and chemical properties. </li></ul><ul><li>Physical properties can be observed! (with your eyes!) IDENTITY OF SUBSTANCE DOES NOT CHANGE! </li></ul><ul><li>You can observe chemical properties only in situations in which the identity of the substance could change. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Types of Properties <ul><li>Physical : properties that can be observed without changing the IDENTITY of the matter </li></ul><ul><li>A physical property is a property or characteristic of and object or substance that can be observed, described, and measured without changing the matter. </li></ul><ul><li>Chemical: property of a substance that changes it into a NEW substance (changes the identity of the substance) </li></ul>Biological: properties of that distinguish living from nonliving matter (growing, moving, reproduce, breathing, responding)
  4. 4. What are physical properties? <ul><li>A physical property is a property or characteristic of and object or substance that can be observed, described, and measured without changing the matter. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Mass <ul><li>Definition: </li></ul><ul><li>The amount of matter </li></ul><ul><li>Example: </li></ul><ul><li>Triple beam balance to measure </li></ul><ul><li>Measured in gram units </li></ul>
  6. 6. Volume <ul><li>Definition: </li></ul><ul><li>how much space the matter takes up </li></ul><ul><li>Example: </li></ul><ul><li>Irregular objects: Water displacement </li></ul><ul><li>Regular objects use measurement </li></ul><ul><li>Liters or m 3 </li></ul><ul><li>1ml = 1cm 3 </li></ul>
  7. 7. Density <ul><li>Definition: </li></ul><ul><li>Mass per unit volume </li></ul><ul><li>Example: </li></ul><ul><li>D=M/V </li></ul><ul><li>g/l, g/ml, or g/cm 3 </li></ul><ul><li>Lead is used for fishing weights because it is more dense than water </li></ul>
  8. 8. More information about density... <ul><li>Density = The amount of matter in a given space or volume </li></ul><ul><li>Density = m Mass </li></ul><ul><li>v Volume </li></ul>
  9. 9. More information about density... <ul><li>Most substances have a unique density: </li></ul><ul><li>Water = 1.00 g/mL </li></ul><ul><li>Gold = 19.32 g/mL </li></ul><ul><li>(See page 13 in your book for a bigger list) </li></ul><ul><li>Density < 1 - The object will float in water </li></ul><ul><li>Density > 1 – The object will sink in water </li></ul>
  10. 10. The Magic Triangle <ul><li>Answers are expressed in g/cm 3 </li></ul><ul><li>or g/mL </li></ul>m D V
  11. 11. State <ul><li>Definition: </li></ul><ul><li>The form in which matter exists: solid, liquid, gas, or plasma </li></ul><ul><li>Ice = Solid </li></ul><ul><li>Water = Liquid </li></ul><ul><li>Helium = Gas </li></ul><ul><li>Lightning = Plasma </li></ul>
  12. 12. Important Temperatures <ul><li>Melting Point: The temperature when a solid becomes a liquid. </li></ul><ul><li>Boiling Point: The temperature when a liquid becomes a gas. </li></ul><ul><li>Freezing Point: The temperature when a liquid becomes a solid. </li></ul><ul><li>Condensation Point: The temperature when a gas becomes a liquid. </li></ul>
  13. 13. State
  14. 14. Color <ul><li>Definition: </li></ul><ul><li>The ability to reflect color </li></ul><ul><li>Example: </li></ul><ul><li>Apples – reflect red or green light </li></ul><ul><li>Dog – white with black spots </li></ul><ul><li>Hair – blonde or black </li></ul><ul><li>Berries – black, red, blue </li></ul><ul><li>Smoke – white or black </li></ul>
  15. 15. Odor <ul><li>Definition: </li></ul><ul><li>The smell or non smell of matter </li></ul><ul><li>Odorless, flowery, spicy, nauseating, sweet </li></ul>
  16. 16. Clarity <ul><li>Definition: </li></ul><ul><li>The ability for light to pass through matter </li></ul><ul><li>Transparent : all light passes through </li></ul><ul><li>Translucent : some light passes through </li></ul><ul><li>Opaque : no light passes through </li></ul>
  17. 17. Luster <ul><li>Definition: </li></ul><ul><li>The ability to reflect light </li></ul><ul><li>Shiny : more reflection </li></ul><ul><li>Dull : less reflection </li></ul>
  18. 18. Form <ul><li>Definition: </li></ul><ul><li>The structure in the matter </li></ul><ul><li>Regular: patterned, cellular, crystalline </li></ul><ul><li>Irregular – no pattern </li></ul>
  19. 19. Texture <ul><li>Definition: </li></ul><ul><li>Describing the surface of the matter </li></ul><ul><li>Examples of textures: </li></ul><ul><li>Rough - </li></ul><ul><li>Smooth - </li></ul><ul><li>Sharp - </li></ul><ul><li>Soft - </li></ul><ul><li>Hard - </li></ul><ul><li>Bumpy - </li></ul>
  20. 20. Brittleness <ul><li>Definition: </li></ul><ul><li>The ability to break or shatter easily </li></ul><ul><li>Example: </li></ul>
  21. 21. Thermal Conductivity <ul><li>Definition: </li></ul><ul><li>The ability to transfer thermal energy (heat) to something else </li></ul><ul><li>Example: </li></ul><ul><li>Coffee in a special cup to prevent heat transfer to our hands </li></ul>
  22. 22. Electrical Conductivity <ul><li>Definition: </li></ul><ul><li>The ability to conduct electricity (the atoms allow their electron to move or flow) </li></ul><ul><li>Example: </li></ul><ul><li>Metals and non metals </li></ul><ul><li>Conductors – good conductivity </li></ul><ul><li>Insulators – no conductivity </li></ul>
  23. 23. Viscosity <ul><li>Definition: </li></ul><ul><li>The ability for matter to flow </li></ul><ul><li>Example: </li></ul><ul><li>Viscous and non- viscous </li></ul><ul><li>Syrup, oil, water all have different viscosities (ml/s) </li></ul>
  24. 24. Hardness <ul><li>Definition: </li></ul><ul><li>The ability to resist scratching </li></ul><ul><li>The Mohs Hardness Scale: </li></ul><ul><li>1 talc </li></ul><ul><li>2 gypsum </li></ul><ul><li>3 calcite </li></ul><ul><li>4 fluorite </li></ul><ul><li>5 apatite </li></ul><ul><li>6 orthoclase </li></ul><ul><li>7 quartz </li></ul><ul><li>8 topaz </li></ul><ul><li>9 corundum </li></ul><ul><li>10 diamond </li></ul>
  25. 25. Malleability <ul><li>Definition: </li></ul><ul><li>The ability to be pounded into thin sheets </li></ul><ul><li>Example: </li></ul><ul><li>Aluminum can be pounded flat to make aluminum foil </li></ul>
  26. 26. Ductility <ul><li>Definition: </li></ul><ul><li>The ability to be drawn into thin wires </li></ul><ul><li>Example: </li></ul><ul><li>Copper is used to make wires </li></ul>
  27. 27. <ul><li>Example: </li></ul><ul><li>Drink mix dissolves in water or sugar dissolves in coffee </li></ul>Solubility <ul><li>Definition: </li></ul><ul><li>The ability for one substance to dissolve into another substance </li></ul>
  28. 28. Physical Changes <ul><li>A physical change is a change that affects one or more physical properties of a substance. </li></ul><ul><li>Physical changes do not form new substances! EX: ice melting or sugar dissolving </li></ul><ul><li>Physical changes are easy to undo. </li></ul>
  29. 29. Chemical Properties <ul><li>property of a substance that changes it into a NEW substance (changes the identity of the substance) </li></ul><ul><li>Chemical properties describe a substance based on its ability to change into a new substance with different properties. </li></ul><ul><li>Chemical properties cannot be observed with your senses. </li></ul><ul><li>Chemical properties aren’t as easy to observe as physical properties. </li></ul><ul><li>Examples of chemical properties: flammability and reactivity </li></ul>
  30. 30. Chemical Properties <ul><li>property of a substance that changes it into a NEW substance (changes the identity of the substance) </li></ul><ul><li>Chemical properties describe a substance based on its ability to change into a new substance with different properties. </li></ul><ul><li>Chemical properties cannot be observed with your senses. </li></ul><ul><li>Chemical properties aren’t as easy to observe as physical properties. </li></ul><ul><li>Examples of chemical properties: flammability and reactivity </li></ul><ul><li>Ex: wood burns to form ash and smoke </li></ul>
  31. 31. Chemical Properties
  32. 32. Chemical Changes <ul><li>A chemical change occurs when one or more substances are changed into entirely new substances with different properties. </li></ul><ul><li>You can observe chemical properties only when a chemical change might occur! </li></ul><ul><li>Examples of chem. changes: </li></ul><ul><li>baking a cake </li></ul><ul><li>rusting </li></ul>
  33. 33. Clues to chemical changes <ul><li>Color change </li></ul><ul><li>Fizzing or bubbling (gas production) </li></ul><ul><li>Heat </li></ul><ul><li>Production of light, sound, or odor. </li></ul><ul><li>Chemical changes are not usually reversible! </li></ul>

×