Delaware State Strategies for NSGIC 2010

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A discussion of the draft update of the Strategies for State Policies and spending, in Delaware

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  • We’re a small state, and the state government pays for most things. So we need to have a coordinated approach to growth and development.
  • The idea is to combine all state and local policies relating to land use management into one comprehensive picture and use that to guide state spending decisions that tend to enable and guide new development.
  • Levels 1, 2 and 3 are where we generally want growth to go. Level four, not so much.
  • First we combine in spatial analyst every factor we can think of that argues for development. Using a 30-meter statewide grid. We give each a factor of 1 and add them all up.
  • Then we do the same with factors that do not favor growth. Each of these gets a factor of negative 1
  • The raw, combined data set has a score for between 20 and negative 11. It matches the cities and towns, and growth areas, pretty well.
  • A little trial and error is needed to find the right classification system to approximate past versions. Then that is made into polygons for further editing.
  • First we create the “Out of Play” by clipping out lands that simply can’t be built on.
  • Then we let the people and the elected people mark the thing up to guide our further editing
  • We found some odd effects that had to be cleaned up. Public lands tended to outline stream corridors, for example.
  • That led us to look at other open water areas and do some cartographic editing…
  • But we have finished and created a single, statewide data set of how we’d like to see development take place
  • And now it’s in the hands of the policy people. With all that work very briefly summed up.
  • Delaware State Strategies for NSGIC 2010

    1. 1. Using Spatial Analysis to Develop a Comprehensive Statewide Land Use PlanMike Mahaffie, Delaware<br />
    2. 2. <ul><li>Three counties
    3. 3. 57 municipalities
    4. 4. 2,000 square miles
    5. 5. 885,000 people
    6. 6. One state government pays:
    7. 7. 90% of roads
    8. 8. 60% – 80% school const.
    9. 9. 100 % school trans.
    10. 10. Most of police/EMS</li></li></ul><li><ul><li>State Strategies for Policies and Spending
    11. 11. First version – 1999
    12. 12. Second – 2004
    13. 13. Third – Now
    14. 14. Four “Investment Levels” and “Out of Play”
    15. 15. Generally match municipalities/traditional growth patterns</li></ul>Yes, it is a golf reference<br />
    16. 16.
    17. 17. <ul><li>Growth areas
    18. 18. Existing development
    19. 19. Existing infrastructure
    20. 20. Planned infrastructure
    21. 21. Schools and libraries
    22. 22. Police, Fire and EMS coverage
    23. 23. Very simple buffers
    24. 24. Hospitals
    25. 25. Etc.</li></li></ul><li><ul><li>High-value aglands and working forests
    26. 26. “Protected Lands”
    27. 27. TDR sending areas
    28. 28. Corridor capacity preservation areas
    29. 29. The Delaware Coastal Zone
    30. 30. Wetlands (plus a buffer)
    31. 31. Floodplain
    32. 32. Water Recharge Areas
    33. 33. Etc.</li></ul>Google “Delaware Coastal Zone Act” sometime<br />
    34. 34.
    35. 35. Then,<br />the fun <br />begins…<br />
    36. 36. <ul><li>Publicly-owned
    37. 37. Federal
    38. 38. State
    39. 39. Local
    40. 40. Permanently preserved
    41. 41. Purchased development rights
    42. 42. Tidal wetlands</li></ul>Don’t talk to me about “Steep Slopes.”<br />This is Delaware<br />
    43. 43. <ul><li>Public meetings to gather general comment
    44. 44. Significant mark-up in meetings with county and municipal government
    45. 45. Add-in all annexation and growth areas
    46. 46. Trim back a few places
    47. 47. General customization</li></ul>Test text terswrittngcompl<br />This is not real. Really it is not.<br /> It’s just<br />Ya know<br />eain<br />Test text terswrittngcompl<br />And in the end<br />The love YOU BRING is lesser than the two<br />WEAVELS!<br />Ya know<br />eain<br />Pretty lame fake mark-ups, I know…<br />
    48. 48.
    49. 49. <ul><li>This is the text box</li></li></ul><li><ul><li>Every inch of the state accounted for
    50. 50. Slivers and gaps and blivits edited away
    51. 51. Polygons simplified and merged where appropriate
    52. 52. Ready, when approved, to help guide state agency spending decisions
    53. 53. (If the legislators don’t mind)</li></ul>And local governments may, or may not, pay any attention<br />
    54. 54. <ul><li>The level of detail I’m allowed in the Document:
    55. 55. “…created using a spatial data analysis that balances state, county and local policies that favor growth for different areas of the state with policies that favor land preservation, agricultural economic development, and natural resource management.”</li></ul>Maybe I should sit down now<br />

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