Kids’ Allergies: Peanuts and Tree Nuts
Create a Safer Learning Environment
Copyright © 2012 www.melanielundheim.com.Any re...
Welcome.You’re about to discover some
ways to prevent, recognize and respond to
peanut and tree nut exposures in school.
2
Exposures to these common foods can trigger a
life-threatening condition known as “anaphylaxis.”
3
• Hives, itching	

• Flushed or pale skin	

• A feeling of impending doom	

• Hoarseness, difficulty breathing	

• Lip, ton...
Food allergies and associated anaphylaxis are
on the rise. Prevalence of peanut and tree nut
allergies alone has tripled b...
Many anaphylactic reactions occur at school --
sometimes to students whose allergies
were unknown at the time of the react...
In fact, many children — like Tessa pictured here — get
anaphylaxis for their first time while at school.
7
We know from experience: the steps you
take to prevent, recognize, and respond to
exposures and anaphylaxis could be life ...
So let’s get started on our discussion about
how to create a safer learning environment for
students with peanut and tree ...
You may already be aware that peanuts and
tree nuts are two of the top eight food allergens,
along with milk, eggs, wheat,...
In general, allergies to milk, egg, wheat and soy
resolve in childhood, whereas allergies to
peanuts, tree nuts, fish and s...
So what exactly are peanuts and tree nuts?
And what’s the difference between them?
12
Peanuts Tree Nuts
Peanuts are legumes and they grow in the ground.
13
Tree nuts, like these, grow on trees.Tree nuts are commonly
processed, and thereby “cross contaminated,” with peanuts.
Alm...
The cause of peanut and tree nut allergies is unknown.
Currently, the only treatment is:
15
• Strict avoidance of the
alle...
Until there’s a cure for food allergies, students
of all ages need your help and vigilance to stay safe.
16
As a rule of thumb, remember that
students must not smell, touch, taste, or eat
peanuts and tree nuts if they’re allergic ...
But, we realize: they can’t live in a bubble!
18
This is why many children with peanut and tree nut
allergies learn early on to advocate for their own safety.
19
Yet, despite their best efforts, it’s a challenge
for them to stay safe in school with so many
kids, contaminants, shared ...
As a result, exposures to these potent food allergens
happen in school more often than other public places.
21
Seem far fetched? Consider that even the most minute
traces of peanut or tree nut can trigger anaphylaxis.
22
Impossible to see with the naked eye, peanut and tree
nut proteins can spread like a virus onto surfaces,
pencils, dispens...
So strive to keep shoe soles, hands, surfaces and
other areas free of peanut and tree nut proteins.
24
Enforce peanut and tree nut free classrooms.This
includes activities before, during and after school.
25
Establish a fail-safe system to ensure all subs, staff members
and volunteers are pre-trained and aware of students’ peanu...
Always read package labels. Foods, as well as science and art
materials, should not contain peanuts or tree nuts or be
mad...
Beware of cross contamination in foods, as well as on
utensils, wind instruments, masks, and other supplies.
28
Also note that hand sanitizer doesn’t kill peanut or tree nut
proteins. So encourage washing with soap and water before
an...
Discontinue preparing and serving peanuts and tree
nuts in the school kitchen to avoid cross contamination.
Make menu ingr...
Create peanut and tree nut free desks and cafeteria tables.
Always wash surfaces, edges and seats with dedicated
cleaning ...
Ensure anaphylactic students have access to their life-saving medication
at all times in class, at recess, and on field tri...
Develop two-way communication systems on and away from
school grounds to rapidly respond to exposures and call 911.
33
Learn how and when to administer epinephrine;
anaphylactic students can’t always do it themselves.
34
Review students’ food allergy action plans. Depending on
symptoms, they may need epinephrine, a call to 911,
and their pre...
To administer epinephrine, refer to your
training and the medication label for instructions.
36
• Hives, itching	

• Flushed or pale skin	

• A feeling of impending doom	

• Hoarseness, difficulty breathing	

• Lip, ton...
Escort and observe anaphylactic students
at all times when they exhibit symptoms.
Seemingly mild reactions can progress wi...
• Teachers and subs	

• Health workers	

• Food service workers	

• Administrators	

• Paras, aides and support staff	

• ...
Be mindful: foods containing peanuts or
tree nuts as a primary ingredient can easily
spread contaminants throughout the sc...
To reduce risk, remove peanut/nut-containing items from
vending machines, and don’t serve or share such items at
student a...
Create, post and enforce your food-allergy management
policy. On a regular basis, communicate it to everyone so
you’ll rem...
Allergic or not, peanut and tree nut allergies
affect us all. Remember: we’re on the same team!
43
So strive to create a culture of
awareness, understanding and compassion
among students, families and staff.
44
Never joke with, tease or bully food-allergic students
or their teachers and caregivers about food allergies.
45
After all, food-allergic students are protected
under the Americans with Disabilities Act.
Federal laws give them rights t...
They need your understanding, vigilance,
and help to stay safer in school.
47
Classrooms, before, during and after
school, and on special occasions	

Kitchens, where kids’ food is prepared,
to avoid c...
All staff, subs, and chaperones are
trained to prevent, recognize and
respond to peanut/nut exposures	

Teachers have a sy...
By making these potentially life-saving adjustments,
all students can feel and stay safer in school.
50
About the presenters:
Soren and Tessa have life-threatening peanut
and tree nut allergies.Together with their
parents, fri...
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Kids' Allergies: Peanuts and Tree Nuts -- Create a Safer Learning Environment

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Melanie Lundheim shares insights into how to create a safer learning environment for students with peanut allergies, tree nut allergies and anaphylaxis. For more information, visit http://melanielundheim.com.

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Kids' Allergies: Peanuts and Tree Nuts -- Create a Safer Learning Environment

  1. 1. Kids’ Allergies: Peanuts and Tree Nuts Create a Safer Learning Environment Copyright © 2012 www.melanielundheim.com.Any reproduction of these materials requires prior written consent.
  2. 2. Welcome.You’re about to discover some ways to prevent, recognize and respond to peanut and tree nut exposures in school. 2
  3. 3. Exposures to these common foods can trigger a life-threatening condition known as “anaphylaxis.” 3
  4. 4. • Hives, itching • Flushed or pale skin • A feeling of impending doom • Hoarseness, difficulty breathing • Lip, tongue or throat swelling • Airway constriction, wheezing • Nausea, vomiting or diarrhea • A weak and rapid pulse • Dizziness, fainting, loss of consciousness • Death Anaphylaxis is a serious allergic reaction that is rapid in onset and may cause one or more of the following symptoms: 4
  5. 5. Food allergies and associated anaphylaxis are on the rise. Prevalence of peanut and tree nut allergies alone has tripled between 1997 and 2008. 5
  6. 6. Many anaphylactic reactions occur at school -- sometimes to students whose allergies were unknown at the time of the reaction. 6
  7. 7. In fact, many children — like Tessa pictured here — get anaphylaxis for their first time while at school. 7
  8. 8. We know from experience: the steps you take to prevent, recognize, and respond to exposures and anaphylaxis could be life saving. 8
  9. 9. So let’s get started on our discussion about how to create a safer learning environment for students with peanut and tree nut allergies. 9
  10. 10. You may already be aware that peanuts and tree nuts are two of the top eight food allergens, along with milk, eggs, wheat, soy, fish and shellfish. 10
  11. 11. In general, allergies to milk, egg, wheat and soy resolve in childhood, whereas allergies to peanuts, tree nuts, fish and shellfish are lifelong. 11
  12. 12. So what exactly are peanuts and tree nuts? And what’s the difference between them? 12 Peanuts Tree Nuts
  13. 13. Peanuts are legumes and they grow in the ground. 13
  14. 14. Tree nuts, like these, grow on trees.Tree nuts are commonly processed, and thereby “cross contaminated,” with peanuts. Almond Brazil Nut Chestnut Hazelnut Hickory Nut Pecan Pine Nut Pistachio Walnut 14
  15. 15. The cause of peanut and tree nut allergies is unknown. Currently, the only treatment is: 15 • Strict avoidance of the allergens • Early recognition of symptoms • Proper management of allergic reactions
  16. 16. Until there’s a cure for food allergies, students of all ages need your help and vigilance to stay safe. 16
  17. 17. As a rule of thumb, remember that students must not smell, touch, taste, or eat peanuts and tree nuts if they’re allergic to them. 17
  18. 18. But, we realize: they can’t live in a bubble! 18
  19. 19. This is why many children with peanut and tree nut allergies learn early on to advocate for their own safety. 19
  20. 20. Yet, despite their best efforts, it’s a challenge for them to stay safe in school with so many kids, contaminants, shared surfaces, and supplies. 20
  21. 21. As a result, exposures to these potent food allergens happen in school more often than other public places. 21
  22. 22. Seem far fetched? Consider that even the most minute traces of peanut or tree nut can trigger anaphylaxis. 22
  23. 23. Impossible to see with the naked eye, peanut and tree nut proteins can spread like a virus onto surfaces, pencils, dispensers, floors, keyboards and more. 23
  24. 24. So strive to keep shoe soles, hands, surfaces and other areas free of peanut and tree nut proteins. 24
  25. 25. Enforce peanut and tree nut free classrooms.This includes activities before, during and after school. 25
  26. 26. Establish a fail-safe system to ensure all subs, staff members and volunteers are pre-trained and aware of students’ peanut and tree nut allergies before entrusting children in their care. 26
  27. 27. Always read package labels. Foods, as well as science and art materials, should not contain peanuts or tree nuts or be made on equipment that processes peanuts or tree nuts. 27
  28. 28. Beware of cross contamination in foods, as well as on utensils, wind instruments, masks, and other supplies. 28
  29. 29. Also note that hand sanitizer doesn’t kill peanut or tree nut proteins. So encourage washing with soap and water before and after eating, and at other times during the day. 29
  30. 30. Discontinue preparing and serving peanuts and tree nuts in the school kitchen to avoid cross contamination. Make menu ingredient lists available at school and online. 30
  31. 31. Create peanut and tree nut free desks and cafeteria tables. Always wash surfaces, edges and seats with dedicated cleaning equipment, warm, soapy water and spray. 31
  32. 32. Ensure anaphylactic students have access to their life-saving medication at all times in class, at recess, and on field trips and busses. 32
  33. 33. Develop two-way communication systems on and away from school grounds to rapidly respond to exposures and call 911. 33
  34. 34. Learn how and when to administer epinephrine; anaphylactic students can’t always do it themselves. 34
  35. 35. Review students’ food allergy action plans. Depending on symptoms, they may need epinephrine, a call to 911, and their prescribed antihistamine and inhaler doses. 35
  36. 36. To administer epinephrine, refer to your training and the medication label for instructions. 36
  37. 37. • Hives, itching • Flushed or pale skin • A feeling of impending doom • Hoarseness, difficulty breathing • Lip, tongue or throat swelling • Airway constriction, wheezing • Nausea, vomiting or diarrhea • A weak and rapid pulse • Dizziness, fainting, loss of consciousness • Death Remember, students may require their medications when one or more of these anaphylactic symptoms are present: 37
  38. 38. Escort and observe anaphylactic students at all times when they exhibit symptoms. Seemingly mild reactions can progress within seconds. 38
  39. 39. • Teachers and subs • Health workers • Food service workers • Administrators • Paras, aides and support staff • Volunteers and chaperones • Custodians • Drivers, coaches, and others Ensure all adults who care for students are trained on how to prevent, recognize, and respond to peanut and tree nut exposures and anaphylaxis, including: 39
  40. 40. Be mindful: foods containing peanuts or tree nuts as a primary ingredient can easily spread contaminants throughout the school. 40
  41. 41. To reduce risk, remove peanut/nut-containing items from vending machines, and don’t serve or share such items at student and faculty potlucks, field trips and other events. 41
  42. 42. Create, post and enforce your food-allergy management policy. On a regular basis, communicate it to everyone so you’ll remain transparent and consistent, district wide. 42
  43. 43. Allergic or not, peanut and tree nut allergies affect us all. Remember: we’re on the same team! 43
  44. 44. So strive to create a culture of awareness, understanding and compassion among students, families and staff. 44
  45. 45. Never joke with, tease or bully food-allergic students or their teachers and caregivers about food allergies. 45
  46. 46. After all, food-allergic students are protected under the Americans with Disabilities Act. Federal laws give them rights to safe schools. 46
  47. 47. They need your understanding, vigilance, and help to stay safer in school. 47
  48. 48. Classrooms, before, during and after school, and on special occasions Kitchens, where kids’ food is prepared, to avoid cross contamination Student and staff potlucks, special events, outdoor areas, and vending machines, where people may carry and spread allergens throughout the schools Shared wind instruments, masks, supplies, and art/science materials Home economics food ingredients Surfaces, in classrooms and at a dedicated lunchroom table Please provide peanut/nut-free: 48
  49. 49. All staff, subs, and chaperones are trained to prevent, recognize and respond to peanut/nut exposures Teachers have a system for informing pre-trained subs of kids’ health issues Systems and communications are in place on school grounds and at field trips to rapidly respond to exposures, administer medications, and call 911 Anaphylactic kids are never unescorted by an adult when symptoms are present; reactions can progress rapidly Your food allergy management policy is posted, communicated and enforced Before adults take charge of students, please ensure: 49
  50. 50. By making these potentially life-saving adjustments, all students can feel and stay safer in school. 50
  51. 51. About the presenters: Soren and Tessa have life-threatening peanut and tree nut allergies.Together with their parents, friends, and photographers, they created this presentation to help adults prevent, recognize, and respond to exposures and anaphylaxis at school. ! Disclaimer: The materials and other information provided by this presentation are for educational, communication, and information purposes only and are not intended to replace or constitute medical advice or treatments. ! For more information, visit: www.melanielundheim.com. Soren,Andy, Melanie, and Tessa Copyright © 2012 www.melanielundheim.com.Any reproduction of these materials requires prior written consent. 51

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