E10 Mar3 2010

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E10 Mar3 2010

  1. 1. March 3, 2010<br />
  2. 2. Housekeeping<br />Hand in<br />vocabulary sentences for “The Tell-Tale Heart”<br />late assignments<br />Website<br />how to check your marks / work missing<br />how to name your files<br />Students who started late please see me before you go today to find out what work you need to catch up on.<br />
  3. 3. Fragments Review<br />A complete sentence must have<br />a subject and verb, and<br />be a complete idea<br />Ex: The dog barked.<br />Groups of words that do not fit this description are called fragments.<br />
  4. 4. Fragments Review<br />Here are some of the types of fragments we looked at:<br />Ex: After we finished dinner.<br /> Because he was late.<br /> To help his mother.<br /> Trying to get to sleep.<br />
  5. 5. Fragments Review<br />Most fragments can be solved by<br />joining them correctly to other sentences<br />adding a subject and changing the verb as needed<br />
  6. 6. Fragments Review<br />Frag: I spent all day in the employment office. Trying to find a job that suited me. The prospects were bleak.<br />Fix #1: I spent all day in the employment office trying to find a job that suited me. The prospects were bleak.<br />Fix #2: I spent all day in the employment office. I was trying to find a job that suited me. The prospects were bleak.<br />
  7. 7. Four Kinds of Fragments<br />Dependent Word Fragments<br />“-ing” and “to” Fragments<br />Added-detail Fragments<br />Missing-subject Fragments<br />
  8. 8. Added-detail Fragments<br />These types of fragments lack a subject and a verb. <br />They usually begin with one of the following words:<br />also, especially, except, for example,<br />including, such as<br />
  9. 9. Added-detail Fragments<br />Ex: Tony has trouble accepting criticism. Except from Lola.<br />To correct these types of fragments, <br />1. join the fragment to the previous sentence.<br />Ex: Tony has trouble accepting criticism, except from Lola.<br />
  10. 10. Added-detail Fragments<br />2. add a subject and a verb.<br />Ex: My apartment has its drawbacks. For example, no hot water in the morning.<br />Ex: My apartment has its drawbacks. For example, there is no hot water in the morning.<br />
  11. 11. Practice, p. 28<br />Frag – “For example, managing . . .”<br />For example, he managed to cut his hand . . .<br />Frag – “About missing parts, . . .”<br />Delete the period, and lowercase “a”<br />All day, people complained about . . . .<br />Frag – “For example, using . . .”<br />For example, she suggests . . .<br />
  12. 12. Missing Subject Fragments<br />Ex: One example of my father’s generosity is that he visits sick friends in the hospital. And takes along get well cards with a few dollars folded in them.<br />The second clause is about the same subject as the first clause (he), but because it doesn’t contain a subject it is a fragment.<br />
  13. 13. Missing Subject Fragments<br />To correct these types of fragments, <br />1. join the fragment to the previous sentence<br />Ex: One example of my father’s generosity is that he visits sick friends in the hospitaland takes along get well cards with a few dollars folded in them.<br />Ex: One example of my father’s generosity is that he visits sick friends in the hospital,andhe takes along get well cards with a few dollars folded in them.<br />
  14. 14. Missing Subject Fragments<br />2. Add a subject.<br />Ex: One example of my father’s generosity is that he visits sick friends in the hospital. He also takes along get well cards with a few dollars folded in them.<br />
  15. 15. Practice, p. 30<br />Frag – “And discovered about . . .”<br />. . . cereal, and he discovered . . .<br />. . . cereal and discovered. . .<br />cereal. He discovered . . . <br />cereal; however, he discovered<br />When Fred went to the . . . ., he discovered<br />Frag – “ then noticed. . .”<br />. . .clothes, and then OR . . . clothes, and I noticed <br />. . .clothes. I noticed. . .<br />
  16. 16. Practice, p. 30 (Cont’d.)<br />Frag - “But did not . ..”<br />. . . weekend but . . . . . .weekend, but he . . . <br />. . . weekend. But he<br />Frag – “Also, was constantly. .”<br />. . . life-style, and he was constantly. . .<br />. . .life-style and was constantly . . .<br />. . . life-style. He was . . .<br />Frag – “And decided. . .”<br />. . .desperation, and he decided. . . OR . . . desperation and decided OR desperation. He decided<br />
  17. 17. Independent Practice<br />Do these review tests on your own over the break. <br />Use the in-class handout/work as a guide. <br />An answer key will be available after Spring Break.<br />
  18. 18. Break<br />
  19. 19. Follow-up on “The Tell-Tale Heart”<br />What words or phrases should we talk about?<br />vex (v.), vexed (past) – to make angry <br />Ex: My mother was vexed at my brother’s behaviour.<br />Ex: Don’t vex me. Don’t make me vexed. His behaviour was vexing.<br />chirp – short sound a bird makes<br />
  20. 20. Follow-up on “The Tell-Tale Heart”<br />2. What parts of the story are unclear or confusing?<br />“When my head was well in the room” – the narrator’s head was leaning into the room<br />chuckle – laughing quietly <br />“It increased my fury” fury (n) = intense anger - <br />furious (adj.) furiously (adv.)<br />cunning (n, adj.) clever, cleverness – often used to outwit, deceive, or gain advantage<br />outwit – win with your mind; outsmart<br />ere long – before, shortly<br />
  21. 21. “The Tell-Tale Heart” Literary Elements<br />Today’s Handout: “Reviewing Story Elements”<br />Previous Handout: “Short Story Terms”<br />In your group, work through today’s handout. <br />Discuss how each element applies to the story “The Tell-Tale Heart.” <br />Refer to the handout that defines the terms. <br />Ask me for help/clarification as needed.<br />If you disagree, make note on your sheet and we will discuss <br />Time: <br />
  22. 22. Class Review of Literary Elements<br />POV – First person – “I heard many . . .”<br />unreliable narrator - a narrator who may not be telling you the truth; you can’t believe everything he/she says<br />Setting –at night; house? senior’s home? hospital? <br />We would need more details to be that specific<br />we can say it is probably a shared home of some kind – house, apartment, boarding houses, doors unlocked<br />How is the setting important? – mysterious, creates a sense of fear, suspense<br />if the characters did not live close to each other in unlocked rooms, the narrator wouldn’t have opportunity to do what he does<br />
  23. 23. Class Review (Cont’d.)<br />Characters<br />Unamed Narrator<br />Round – lots of details: beginning – calm, stressed, stealthy, persistent, patient, clever, bold<br />Static – though his emotions or state of mind change, we do not have enough information to judge if his views and beliefs have changed.<br />
  24. 24. Homework<br />Questions for the “The Tell-Tale Heart.” Due Monday, March 15th.<br />Fragments: Review Tests – AK will be provided after the Spring Break.<br />Outline and Draft of “My Proudest Accomplishment”. <br /><ul><li>many students still have not done one or both of these things.
  25. 25. All students should complete these practice assignments and hand in by March 15th.
  26. 26. They will be the basis of the work we do after the break.</li>

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