E10 Mar1 2010

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E10 Mar1 2010

  1. 1. March 1, 2010<br />
  2. 2. Housekeeping<br />Hand in questions for “The Possibility of Evil.”<br />Web site – all accounts are now set up. If you have not yet logged in, please try asap so we can make sure it is working.<br />
  3. 3. Grammar Assessment Feedback<br />Handouts<br />Marked Grammar Assessments <br />List of Class Topics<br />Topics not on list<br />You should work independently on any topics not covered in class in which you did not get a perfect score. <br />Newer students <br />you are welcome to complete the grammar assessment outside of class time if you wish to know their strengths and weaknesses.<br />
  4. 4. *Brief* Review of Sentence Structure<br />1. Simple Sentence = S + v (plus variations)<br />Independent Clause<br />Ex: The students shouted.<br /> The students asked questions.<br /> Teachers give homework to their students.<br />
  5. 5. *Brief* Review of Sentence Structure<br />2. Compound Sentences = S + v, and s + v.<br />Two or more independent clauses joined together with a coordinate conjunction.<br />Ex: The teacher finished the lesson on Thursday, so she gave a test on Friday.<br /> I asked the teacher a question, but she didn’t know the answer.<br />
  6. 6. *Brief* Review of Sentence Structure<br />3. Complex Sentences = S + v because s+ v.<br />= Because s + v, s + v.<br />Independent clause plus a dependent clause (any order) <br />Ex: The students stopped talking when the teacher entered the room.<br />When the teacher entered the room, the students stopped talking.<br />
  7. 7. Fragments<br />A fragment is a word group that might look like a sentence, but is not because<br />it lacks a subject or a verb, and<br />it does not express a complete thought.<br />Ex: To cash his paycheque.<br /> After I stopped drinking coffee.<br />
  8. 8. Four Kinds of Fragments<br />Dependent Word Fragments<br />“-ing” and “to” Fragments<br />Added-detail Fragments<br />Missing-subject Fragments<br />
  9. 9. Dependent Word Fragments<br />Certain words can make a group of words dependent:<br />after, although, as, because, if, since, unless, what, when, which, who, etc. <br />(more on p. 19 of handout)<br />
  10. 10. Dependent Word Fragments<br />Starting a sentence with these words can result in a fragment if you do not take care.<br />Ex: After I stopped drinking coffee.<br />When I was young.<br />During the class.<br />If I were rich.<br />These are dependent clauses because they do not make sense all by themselves.<br />
  11. 11. Dependent Word Fragments<br />To correct this type of fragment, join the dependent clause to an independent clause.<br />Ex: When I was young,I liked to ride my bike.<br />If I were rich, I would buy a house.<br />During the class, we should not talk.<br />
  12. 12. Dependent Word Fragments<br />When correcting these types of fragments in your own writing you can<br />try joining them with the sentence that comes before or after the fragment (p. 20)<br />rewrite the sentence without the dependent word (p. 21)<br />
  13. 13. Practice, p. 22<br />After I finished work on Friday, I went to Robson Square to skate.<br />. . . I went to play badminton with my friend.<br />. . . I joined my friends at Harrison Hot Springs.<br />Because the class was cancelled, the students left the building.<br />. . . .I couldn’t give my homework to the teacher.<br />. . . my brother and I drove to Whistler to go skiing.<br />
  14. 14. Practice, p. 22<br />When my car stalled on the highway, I called BCAA for assistance.<br />. . . I got so nervous.<br />The supermarket that I went to was not open until 10 a.m.<br />. . . has a very nice bakery department.<br />5. Before I left the house, I finished my work.<br />. . . I locked the door.<br />
  15. 15. “-ing” and “to” Fragments<br />When an “-ing” word or “to” phrase appears at the start of a word group, a fragment may result:<br />Ex: I spent all day in the employment office. Trying to find a job that suited me. The prospects were bleak.<br />Ex: To remind people of their selfishness. Otis leaves handwritten notes on cars that take up two parking spaces.<br />
  16. 16. “-ing” and “to” Fragments<br />The easiest way to correct these types of fragments is to join them to another sentence.<br />“-ing” fragments can usually be joined to the sentence before or after it. <br />Ex: I spent all day in the employment office. Trying to find a job that suited me. The prospects were bleak.<br />Ex: I spent all day in the employment office trying to find a job that suited me. The prospects were bleak.<br />
  17. 17. “-ing” and “to” Fragments<br />“To” fragments should be joined to the sentence that comes after it.<br />Ex: To remind people of their selfishness. Otis leaves handwritten notes on cars that take up two parking spaces.<br />Ex: To remind people of their selfishness, Otis leaves handwritten notes on cars that take up two parking spaces.<br />
  18. 18. “-ing” and “to” Fragments<br />Another way to correct “-ing” fragments is add a subject and change the –ing word to the verb form that agrees with the new subject.<br />Ex: I spent all day in the employment office. Trying to find a job that suited me. The prospects were bleak.<br />Ex: I spent all day in the employment office. I was trying to find a job that suited me. The prospects were bleak.<br />
  19. 19. Practice, p. 26<br />Glistening with dew, the gigantic . . . .<br />The gigantic web . . . of the tree. It was glistening with dew. The spider. . .<br />The gigantic web . . . , glistening with dew. <br />Martha is pleased with . . . kitchen, claiming. . . <br />Claiming . . . . , Martha is pleased . . . .<br />Martha is pleased . . . . kitchen. She claims that . . .<br />
  20. 20. Practice, p. 26<br />3.Removing the kinds he didn’t like, Ron picked through . . . . <br />Ron picked through the box . . . chocolates. He removed. . . <br />Ron picked through the box of chocolates, removing the kinds . . . .<br />The grass I was walking on . . .squishy because I had. . .<br />The grass I was walking on . . . squishy. The reason was that I had. . . . [It was due to the fact that]<br />Because I had hiked into a marsh, the grass I was walking on . . . <br />Steve drove quickly to the bank. He cashed his paycheck.<br />bank to cash his paycheck. [Canadian spelling: paycheque].<br />
  21. 21. Break<br />
  22. 22. The Tell-Tale Heart<br />What does the title suggest to you?<br />What does “Tell-Tale” mean?<br />revealing, giving a signal or clue<br />We say “there was a tell-tale sign”<br />How might a heart be revealing?<br />
  23. 23. The Tell-Tale Heart - Vocabulary<br />*acute (adj.) – sharp, keen<br />death watches (n.) – small destructive beetles that live in wood and make ticking sounds; they were once believed to be omens of death <br />*derision (n.) – mockery, scorn<br />dissemble (v.) – conceal one’s real motives or emotions by pretense; conceal the truth; cover up; deceive <br />
  24. 24. The Tell-Tale Heart - Vocabulary<br />dissimulation (n.) - the act of dissembling – deceit, pretense<br />*Evil Eye (n.) - an old superstition based on the idea that harm or bad luck might be caused by someone looking at you in an odd way. – a type of curse<br />gesticulations (n. pl.) – body language, gestures<br />*reposed (v. past) – rested, lay<br />sagacity (n.) – wisdom, sharpness or keenness of mind, <br />
  25. 25. The Tell-Tale Heart - Vocabulary<br />*stealthily (adv.) – secretly, [clandestinely ] quietly, carefully<br />suavity (n.) – smooth politeness<br />tattoo (n.) – drumming or beating <br />*vehemently (adv.) – showing very strong feelings, especially anger; passionately, excitedly<br />
  26. 26. Homework<br />Write sentences for the following vocabulary words from “The Tell-Tale Heart.” <br />acute<br />derision<br />Evil Eye<br />reposed<br />stealthily<br />vehemently<br /> Make sure your sentences<br />use the correct form of the word, and<br />that they show the meaning of the word (as used in the story.<br />Due Wednesday, March 3rd.<br />Re-read the story on your own. We will discuss it in more detail on Wednesday.<br />

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