E10 Apr12 2010

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E10 Apr12 2010

  1. 1. April 12, 2010<br />
  2. 2. Housekeeping<br />Grammar quiz on Wednesday.<br />Short Story exam on Monday.<br />All short story work due Monday.<br />
  3. 3. Fragments<br />A fragment is a word group that might look like a sentence, but is not because<br />it lacks a subject or a verb, and<br />it does not express a complete thought.<br />Ex: To cash his paycheque.<br /> After I stopped drinking coffee.<br />
  4. 4. Correcting Fragments<br />Most fragments can be corrected by<br />correctly joining the word group with the sentence before or after it, or<br />adding a subject and verb <br />Ex: I spent all day in the employment office. Trying to find a job that suited me. <br />Ex: I spent all day in the employment office, trying to find a job that suited me.<br />Ex: I spent all day in the employment office. I was trying to find a job that suited me. <br />
  5. 5. Run-Ons<br />Run-ons are groups of complete thoughts that run together without correct separation or joining. <br />Ex: My grades are very good this semester my social life rates only a C. (fused sentence)<br />Ex: My grades are very good this semester, my social life rates only a C. (comma splice)<br />
  6. 6. Four Ways to Correct Run-Ons<br />1. Use a period and a capital letter to break the two complete thoughts into separate sentences.<br />Ex: My grades are very good this semester. My social life rates only a C.<br />2. Use a commaplus a joining word to connect the two complete thoughts.<br />Ex: My grades are very good this semester, but my social life rates only a C.<br />
  7. 7. Correcting Run-Ons<br />3. Use a semi-colon to connect the two complete thoughts.<br />Ex: My grades are very good this semester; my social life rates only a C.<br />4. Use a dependent word to join the complete thoughts (subordination).<br />Ex: Although My grades are very good this semester, my social life rates only a C.*<br />Ex: My grades are very good this semester although my social life rates only a C.<br />Ex: My grades are very good this semester; my social life rates only a C though.<br />Ex: My grades are very good this semester although my social life rates only a C.*<br />
  8. 8. Subject-Verb Agreement<br />Singular subjects must take a singular verb.<br />I walk fast, you walk fast, and he/she walks faster.<br />Plural subjects must take a plural verb.<br />We walk fast, and they walk fast too.<br />
  9. 9. Mistakes in Subject-Verb Agreement. . . <br />. . . usually occur in the following situations:<br />1. When words come between the subject and verb<br />Ex: The noisy dogsin my neighbourhood get on my nerves.<br />2. When a verb comes before a subject<br />Ex: On Bill’s doorstep were two police officers.<br />
  10. 10. Mistakes in Subject-Verb Agreement. . . <br />3. With compound subjects<br />Ex: MikeandSharonhave a lot of work to do. (compound subject = always plural)<br />But: Ex: Either the students or the teachertakes a day off every month. (For “either/or,” “neither/nor,” or “not only/but” verb agrees with closest subject ) .<br />4. With indefinite pronouns (“-body,” “-one,” “-thing words,” and each, either, neither = always singular)<br />Ex: Nobodyhas anything nice to say. <br />
  11. 11. Pronoun Agreement and Reference<br />Pronouns must agree with the noun they replace:<br />NOT: The student forgot their homework.<br />BUT: The student forgot his homework.<br />It should be clear which noun a pronoun is referring to:<br />Ex: Joe almost dropped out of high school because he felt they emphasized discipline too much.<br />Ex: Joe almost dropped out of high school because he felt the teachers emphasized discipline too much.<br />
  12. 12. Questions?<br />Because the weather is bad, I have decided /am deciding / am going to stay home.<br />because = dependent word<br />however = conjunctive adverb<br />I went to school, but the weather was rainy (and, or, but, for, yet, so, . . .)<br />I went to school although the weather was rainy. (before, when, if, since, . . .)<br />I went to school; however, the weather was rainy (therefore, nevertheless, . . .)<br />
  13. 13. Practice Handouts<br />Complete the practice handouts now and then check your work against the answer key provided.<br />
  14. 14. BREAK<br />
  15. 15. Narrative Paragraphs<br />Review the feedback on your rough drafts and rewrite (do a final draft now).<br />
  16. 16. Homework<br />Study for Grammar Quiz!!! (Wednesday)<br />Study for Short Story Exam (Monday)<br />Finish all short story assignments for Monday.<br />

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