Speech Events

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Speech Events

  1. 1. Speech Events<br />Mira Loma Speech and Debate<br />
  2. 2. Impromptu<br />
  3. 3. Overview<br />Preparation time: 2 minutes<br />Speaking time: 5 minutes<br />Suggested Structure:<br />Introduction (30 seconds)<br />3 Body paragraphs (4 minutes)<br />Conclusion (30 seconds)<br />Topics: Words, Quotes, Questions<br />Wheels<br />Clouds<br />“Nobility is not a birthright. It is defined by one’s actions.” – Robin Hood<br />“We’re gonna need a bigger boat.” – Jaws<br />
  4. 4. How To Prepare<br />Think of potential ideas beforehand. Refrain, however, from canning (pre-planning) your speeches. <br />PRACTICE! <br />During the two-minute preparation time: <br />1. Memorize the quote<br />2. Think of three ideas<br />3. Tie in your intro and conclusion<br />
  5. 5. National and International Extemporaneous Speaking<br />
  6. 6. Overview<br />Preparation time: 30 minutes<br />Speaking Time: 7 minutes<br />About: National and International Extemp are two different events. The speeches require an immense amount of current events knowledge.<br />Examples of Questions: <br />National: “What should Obama do to combat unemployment?”<br />International: “Is there hope for Afghanistan’s economy?”<br />
  7. 7. How to Prepare<br />RESEARCH<br />Read a variety of newspapers and magazines (The Economist, Newsweek, Business week, TIME, Wall Street Journal, Foreign Affairs, etc.)<br />Help make the team extemp box (a box filled with files containing articles from various sources)<br />During Preparation Time:<br />Consult articles from the team extemp box to help you prepare your speech. Create a detailed outline and memorize your sources so that you can cite them during your speech.<br />
  8. 8. INTERPRETATION EVENTS<br />
  9. 9. Overview<br />Time: 10 minutes<br />Procedure: Use a piece from any published material (usually books). A main component of the presentation is the cutting of the script. After finding a book, it is important weave certain parts of it together to form a script.<br />Types: Humorous, Duo, Dramatic, Thematic, and Oratorical<br />
  10. 10. Humorous Interpretation<br />Funny; scripts chosen usually are of inherently humorous nature <br />- Usually includes a multitude of characters, similar to a one-man show. (Do not confuse this event with stand-up comedy)<br />Voices and movement are especially important. Judges look for apt characterization.<br />
  11. 11. Duo Interpretation<br />- Two-person event<br />Can be humorous, dramatic, or neither<br />- Scripts chosen are wide-ranging, but most include at least traces of humor<br />Cannot look at or touch your partner.<br />
  12. 12. Dramatic Interpretation<br />Scripts are dramatic and should pertain to serious issues of society.<br />Ranges from including a small number of characters to a large number of characters.<br />Movement and voices should be distinct for different characters.<br />
  13. 13. Thematic Interpretation<br />Can be funny, dramatic, or neither<br />Multiple scripts are selected (3 or more) and a universal theme is extracted from each and stressed throughout the performance<br />The mechanics of a thematic interpretation are completely up to the performer<br />NOT recognized by the National Forensics League, but is recognized by the California High School Speech Association. You cannot attend nationals in this event, but you can attend states in it. <br />
  14. 14. Oratorical Interpretation<br />One-person event, based on a famous, previously performed, oratory<br />Scripts chosen are usually historical speeches (presidential speeches, commencement speeches, etc.)<br />Very good introductory speech event, quite popular among younger members of speech and debate<br />NOT recognized by the National Forensics League, but is recognized by the California High School Speech Association. You cannot attend nationals in this event, but you can attend states in it.<br />
  15. 15. Original Events<br />
  16. 16. Overview<br />Length: 10 minutes<br />These scripts are created by the speaker and unlike interps, are not obtained through previously published material. <br />Events: Original Oratory, Expository, Original Advocacy, and Original Prose and Poetry<br />
  17. 17. Original Oratory<br />Should make an argument regarding a relatively trivial issue. <br />Can by humorous or dramatic; most scripts include a little bit of both<br />Examples of topics: Importance of telling the truth, Importance of eating healthy, Negative effects of obesity, etc.<br />Structure: Should start with an attention-getter and support position with evidence<br />
  18. 18. Expository<br />This event is unique because it allows for the use of props.<br />This speech should not persuade the audience, but simply inform and entertain.<br />Examples of Topics: Reading, Mars, Memory, Perception<br />NOT recognized by the National Forensics League, but is recognized by the California High School Speech Association. You cannot attend nationals in this event, but you can attend states in it.<br />
  19. 19. Original Advocacy<br />Persuasive speech<br />Structure: find a problem, explain why we should be concerned with it, present a solution in the form of proposed legislation, and explain why this legislation is the best solution.<br />Example Topics: American foreign policy, economic crisis, poverty. <br />The judging is usually based on content, persuasiveness, and delivery.<br />NOT recognized by the National Forensics League, but is recognized by the California High School Speech Association. You cannot attend nationals in this event, but you can attend states in it.<br />
  20. 20. Original Prose and Poetry<br />One of the most creative events.<br />Competitors have a lot of freedom in determining potential topics. Topics range from traditional poetry to humorous depictions. <br />Highly recommended for students who love to write. <br />NOT recognized by the National Forensics League, but is recognized by the California High School Speech Association. You cannot attend nationals in this event, but you can attend states in it.<br />

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