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Embedded Librarianship...Getting Started

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Part 2: SCRLC webinar on Embedded Librarianship

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Embedded Librarianship...Getting Started

  1. 1. Getting Started…Making an Impact Embedded Librarianship Part 2 Courtney Mlinar SCRLC 2015
  2. 2. Your homework: SWOT Analysis • You • Your organization • Your library
  3. 3. SWOT Analysis: • Strengths • Weaknesses • Opportunities • Threats
  4. 4. Strengths: • Knowledge • Training • Tech Tools • Staffing • Experience • Successful projects with outside groups in the past
  5. 5. Weaknesses: • New to the profession or location • Short staffed • Budget cuts • Few databases • Technology learning curve • New role at your library
  6. 6. Opportunities: • New technology or new interest • Change- staff, accreditation requirements • Outside organization reaches out to library • New staff or resources • New services • Serendipitous meeting of minds
  7. 7. Threats: • Funding may be cut • Changes in staffing at library • New administration in outside organization • Librarian confidence • Unsuccessful embedded efforts in past • Relationship problems caused by former librarian employee
  8. 8. You control Your competencies Your skill-sets Your attitude Your education
  9. 9. You cannot control… • Opportunities • Threats
  10. 10. Poll #1: Strengths
  11. 11. Poll #2: Weaknesses
  12. 12. Opportunities and Threats: 2 Lists: • You and your library • The outside organization you hope to embed
  13. 13. Sample Questions for SWOT • To ask the outside organization: with what issues is your organization is dealing? • To ask yourself: what progress have you made to integrate library services and resources into your organization so far? List any accomplishments you have as an embedded librarian in the past or at previous organizations.
  14. 14. More Questions: • What is your biggest obstacle to becoming embedded in your selected organization? • If you could not fail, what would you do differently at your organization? • Has anything happened to make you more cautious about initiating an embedded librarian program at your organization?
  15. 15. Examples of SWOT: Types of library: • Medical • Public • Academic • Special • School
  16. 16. Medical
  17. 17. SWOT • S: Longtime relationship with hospital staff • W: Solo librarian • O: Running CE program at hospital • T: Recent hospital affiliation with new med school- staff are using med school library resources more than hospital resources
  18. 18. Public:
  19. 19. SWOT: • S: New Overdrive subscription • W: Staff needs training on database and devices • O: Volunteers wanted for Storytime program at Girls and Boys Club • T: Administration does not want librarians to leave the library
  20. 20. Academic:
  21. 21. SWOT: • S: Strong team of instruction librarians • W: Needs training on tools such as LibGuides v.2, Articulate online, Camtasia • O: New course- First time in College Seminar- 454 sections- online Blackboard course • T: Time restrictions- 2 months to create content plus curriculum is very full at this point…everyone wants a piece of the action
  22. 22. Special:
  23. 23. SWOT: • S: Librarian experience with archives • W: Learning curve with Disney Archives • O: Apply sound cataloging principals that may leave legacy on the archiving of film • T: Budget- new position will have to justify any technology/equipment/staff spending
  24. 24. School:
  25. 25. SWOT: • S: Excellent collection of databases, new laptops • W: New to school • O: Administration wants faculty to use more educational technology • T: Upcoming budget may eliminate librarians or have librarians travel to 3 different schools
  26. 26. Why is SWOT important? Strategic planning: • Where can we make the highest impact? • How can we be part of an important solution? • Where is the action? • Where are librarians needed?
  27. 27. Sample Plan for a College Library: • Create a curriculum for information literacy • Identify courses with research component or that have IL Student Learning Outcomes • Outreach to faculty who are library champions (preach to the choir) • Provide tutorials, libguides and instruction
  28. 28. Next steps: Step 2 • List your Tools:
  29. 29. Poll #3 Tools
  30. 30. Communication and Motivational Types: Step 3
  31. 31. Know Thyself
  32. 32. Achiever: • Goal setter • Likes checklists • Tests skills with new challenges • Looks for opportunities to try new things • Diplomas, awards decorate their office
  33. 33. Affiliator • Values relationships • People person • Seeks opportunities to be supportive • Messy desk, projects in piles all over the office, pictures of family in office
  34. 34. Power Person: • Enjoys change • Seeks opportunities to influence others • Enjoys activities that are transformational • Cleans desk at end of day, artwork in office • May be OCD-ish
  35. 35. Analytical: • Logical, well-organized • Seeks opportunities to find more information • Sees both sides of issues • Prefers to work independently • May hoard info in office, evidence of eating at their desk
  36. 36. Poll #4:
  37. 37. Communication Styles: • Specific and detailed • Persuasive and evidence-based • Supportive and reassuring • Expressive and eloquent • Forceful and aggressive
  38. 38. How we process information: • Sensory- sensing information • Logical- thinking information • Emotional- feeling information • Conceptual- information trending
  39. 39. Poll #5:
  40. 40. Poll #6:
  41. 41. Poll #7:
  42. 42. Leadership Styles: • Transactional • Transformational
  43. 43. Transactional Embedded librarian as: • Problem solver • Gap filler • Crisis manager
  44. 44. Transformational: Librarian role: • Shared vision • Goals which help whole organization, not just self-interest for smaller groups • Change facilitator
  45. 45. Conflict or Different Interests: • How do you deal with it?
  46. 46. Managing conflicting interests: • Forcing or competing • Accommodating • Withdrawing • Smoothing • Collaborating (win-win) • Compromising
  47. 47. Step 4: What has worked well in the past?
  48. 48. Librarianship and change- • Heart • Human Element
  49. 49. Last lecture – Randy Pausch “The brick walls are there for a reason. The brick walls are not there to keep us out. The brick walls are there to give us a chance to show how badly we want something. Because the brick walls are there to stop the people who don’t want it badly enough. They’re there to stop the other people.” “Experience is what you get when you didn't get what you wanted. And experience is often the most valuable thing you have to offer.”
  50. 50. Best quote- • “When we're connected to others, we become better people.”
  51. 51. Conversation starters…
  52. 52. New issues, new people-
  53. 53. New Framework for IL…
  54. 54. New technology, new web site…
  55. 55. My favorite…mobile apps! Poll #8
  56. 56. Poll #9:
  57. 57. Poll #10:
  58. 58. iPads in Programs at NSU: Fall 2013: New Students in the Programs • College of Osteopathic Medicine • College of Dental Medicine • College of Pharmacy • College of Optometry
  59. 59. NSU LibGuide- Apps http://nova.campusguides.com/introhpdlibrary/mobile • Used to be device-specific • Now expect to work on any platform
  60. 60. ACC: • All librarians have iPads – from 3rd gen to iPad Air • Circulating Nexus, Windows, Dell Vue Android tablets • LibGuides by J. Buckstead: http://researchguides.austincc.edu/ipad http://researchguides.austincc.edu/tablet
  61. 61. All Apps are not equal… • Abridged versions of databases • Native apps: use device features such as camera, • GPS • Hybrid apps: combo native app and mobile- optimized web site • Pure mobile-optimized web site with app portal
  62. 62. Mobile-optimized Apps: • Hybrid apps- native app platform plus mobile optimized database • Pure mobile-optimized apps • Require wi-fi or internet access
  63. 63. App Gaps: • Unreliable reviews • Cross-platform operability • Usefulness
  64. 64. How do you Evaluate an App?
  65. 65. Evaluating Information CRAAP (Chico State) Test: • Currency • Relevancy • Authority • Accuracy • Purpose
  66. 66. Dehydrated Water Hoax web site: http://www.buydehydratedwater.com/home.html
  67. 67. RYT Hospital Hoax web site: http://rythospital.com/
  68. 68. Evaluating Apps: CRAPPIES • Currency • Relevance • Authority • Purpose • Proven (Accurate, Useful) • Intuitive * • Easy • Stable Interface • *Spool, J. M. (2005). What makes a Design seem ‘Intuitive’? Retrieved • Jan. 20, 2012, from http://www.uie.com/articles/design_intuitive/
  69. 69. Library site and subscriptions: • Access Medicine • EBSCO • GALE • StatRef • Science Direct • Clinical Key • OvidMD • Psych Online • Access Pharmacy • Red Book Online • Web of Knowledge • UptoDate • First Consult • Visual Dx
  70. 70. Skyscape Apps: • Look for free ones, plus- • DynaMed • Natural Standard • Outlines in Clinical Medicine • Rx Drugs
  71. 71. More Drug Apps: • Clinical Pharmacology Mobile • Medical Letter • Sanford Antimicrobial • PEPID (free version) • Pharmacy Pro • Epocrates • Pill Finder • LactMed • Micromedex Drug Info • Micromedex Drug Interaction • Lexicomp
  72. 72. Top Productivity Apps: • Dropbox • Evernote • Slide Shark • Mighty Meeting • Adobe Connect • Go to Meeting
  73. 73. Top Virtual Meeting: • Facetime • Skype • Go to Meeting • Web Ex • Google Hangout
  74. 74. Reading Apps: • iBook • Kindle • Stanza • Inkling • Kno Textbooks • Vital Source • Bluefire Reader • Nook • Audiobooks • OverDrive • CourseSmart • Pearson eText • Merck Manual • eBrary • Taber’s Medical Dictionary • Kobo
  75. 75. Browser Apps: • Puffin • Dolphin
  76. 76. PDF Apps: • iAnnotate • Noteability • PDF Expert
  77. 77. NEW: Microsoft Office • Nearly a GB in size • Requires a one year subscription to Office 365 ($100) to edit and create- do you have Outlook.com, Xbox accounts?- can install on 5 desktops, 5 tablets • Free version is Read only • Word, Excel, PowerPoint, One Note • Backs up your work on Microsoft One Drive (7GB free storage) • How to Print documents not intuitive, does not “open with…”such as Printer Pro • Some gaps such as Charts in Word
  78. 78. Plans for Businesses: Start at $5 per month, $60 per year for up to 25 users • Business-class email, • online conferencing, • public website, • file storage and sharing and office online. The step-up program is $12.50 per month or $150 per year and adds • access to the desktop versions of Word, Excel, PowerPoint, OneNote and several other titles • requires a one-year contract and costs $15 per month, but can be used by up to 300 people and it adds Active Directory integration self-service business intelligence.
  79. 79. 2 ways to get Office 365: • Inside MS Office app – use iTunes • Go to office.microsoft.com = pay $99 or $9.99 monthly (Skip downloading iTunes apps step if you already downloaded the apps- can be confusing) Login with Microsoft account to have app activate paid features
  80. 80. Alternatives: • iWorks • Pages • Numbers • Keynote (some quirky formatting when switching back and forth from MS Office to iWorks)
  81. 81. NLM Apps: • PubMed on Tap • WebMD http://www.nlm.nih.gov/mobile/
  82. 82. What are using?
  83. 83. Collaborative Tools- • Solo Librarian • Short staffed • How to outreach without leaving the library…
  84. 84. Centers of Influence within your community: • Name comes up all the time • May be a gatekeeper • Will introduce you to others • Refers colleagues to you
  85. 85. Politics
  86. 86. Listen and sympathize… • Don’t take sides • Be a vault • Remain neutral
  87. 87. Next steps- your action plan… What would be the easiest way to get started?
  88. 88. List your opportunities…
  89. 89. Who are your library champions?
  90. 90. Who is your favorite?
  91. 91. Any new programs?
  92. 92. New events?
  93. 93. New staff?
  94. 94. New requirements?
  95. 95. New courses?
  96. 96. New technology?
  97. 97. Any current partnerships?
  98. 98. Any old programs to update?
  99. 99. Use library volunteers?
  100. 100. Got social media?
  101. 101. Upcoming workshops?
  102. 102. Plan of action: • Visibility • Maximum Impact • Accessibility
  103. 103. Baby steps to Snowball effects… • Take the path of least resistance • Partner with your favorite people first • Be persistent and patient…remember how much you can help them! • People who know you care about their projects/classes/students will always listen • Most people need the help of librarians • When you partner, do it shoulder to shoulder • Find out what they need, then offer to help them • If you encounter resistance, stress that you can assist them with their projects / goals.
  104. 104. Leaders don’t operate in isolation
  105. 105. What are you projecting? • How much energy does holding this position expend? • Where are your contributions taking you? • Are you working from fear or vision?
  106. 106. What are your intentions? • Have you made a road map? • Do you see a pathway?
  107. 107. Where would you like to improve? • When do you operate at your peak? • How can you make better decisions?
  108. 108. Use the back door if necessary…
  109. 109. Poll #11:
  110. 110. My 2 new projects: • Speech department: Smart Mouth tutorial • First Year Seminar: tutorials and content for Blackboard
  111. 111. Make an Impact!
  112. 112. Good luck!
  113. 113. Thank you! Courtney Mlinar mlinarklar@yahoo.com Courtney.mlinar@austincc.edu

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