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Days 1& 2 introduction to ldc

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Days 1& 2 introduction to ldc

  1. 1.  How much do you know about the Common Core State Standards?  Fist to Five: On a scale of 0 to 5 with 0 being no familiarity and 5 being thoroughly knowledgeable, where are you in relation to the CCSS?  What is your biggest question or concern about the CCSS?
  2. 2.  What is your biggest question or concern about the CCSS? ◦ On your computers, go to the PSESD Literacy Website: http://literacy.psesd.org/ ◦ On your phones, go to your Twitter account ◦ Tweet your questions and concerns by sending a tweet to:  @psesdliteracy#ccss (enter comment here)
  3. 3. http://corestandards.org/
  4. 4. September 30, 2013
  5. 5.  Collaboratively developed with: • Teachers • School Administrators • Educational Experts  To provide consistency in the education of our children  To be college and career-ready 6
  6. 6.  Are aligned with college and work expectations;  Include rigorous content and application of knowledge through high-order skills;  Build upon strengths and lessons of current state standards;  Informed by top-performing countries, so that all students are prepare to succeed in our global economy and society;  Are evidence and/or research based; and  Will be reviewed and revised on a set cycle 7
  7. 7.  Prior to introduction of CCSS, every state had its own set of academic standards.  Expectation levels varied state to state.  All students need to be able to compete with not only American students, but with international peers. 8
  8. 8. Do Not Provide… • A complete scope and sequence. • A course outline. • All the essential skills and knowledge students could have. Do… • Outline the most essential skills and knowledge every student needs to master to be college and career-ready. • Distribute responsibility for students’ literacy development. 9
  9. 9. 10 http://corestandards.org/
  10. 10.  How do you engage students in reading and responding to complex texts in your discipline? Let’s examine one standard across grade levels.
  11. 11. Grade and Standard K - With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text. 1 st Ask and answer questions about key details in a text. 2 nd Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text. Deconstructing Reading Anchor Standard One Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text. 12 (No prompting)
  12. 12. 2 nd Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text. 3 rd Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. 4 th Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. 5 th Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. 13 Grade and Standard
  13. 13. 5 th Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. 6 th Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 7 th Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 8 th Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 14 Grade and Standard
  14. 14. 8 th Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 9 th /10 th Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 11 th /12 th Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. 15 Grade and Standard
  15. 15. Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts Literacy in History/ Social Studies, Mathematics, Science, and Technical Subjects
  16. 16. 1 7  Reading Standards for History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects ◦ Knowledge of domain-specific vocabulary ◦ Analyze, evaluate, and differentiate primary and secondary sources ◦ Synthesize quantitative and technical information, including facts presented in maps, timelines, flowcharts, or diagrams  Writing Standards for History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects ◦ Write arguments on discipline-specific content and informative/explanatory texts ◦ Use of data, evidence, and reason to support arguments and claims ◦ Use of domain-specific vocabulary
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  19. 19. Directions: With your elbow partner  Identify the major expectations at your grade level and content area  Compare your grade level expectations to the grade before it and after it.  Be prepared to share your comparisons with the entire group. 20
  20. 20. Pedagogical Shifts Demanded by the CCSS Shift 1 Balancing Informational & Literary Text Students read a true balance of informational and literary texts. Shift 2 Knowledge in the Disciplines Students build knowledge about the world (domains/content areas) through TEXT rather than the teacher or activities. Shift 3 Staircase of Complexity Students read the central, grade appropriate text around which instruction is centered. Teachers are patient, create more time and space and support in the curriculum for close reading. Shift 4 Text-based Answers Students engage in rich and rigorous evidence- based conversations about text. Shift 5 Writing from Sources Writing emphasizes use of evidence from sources to inform or make an argument. Shift 6 Academic and Technical Vocabulary Students constantly build the transferable vocabulary they need to access grade-level complex texts. This can be done effectively by spiraling like content in increasingly complex texts.
  21. 21. 22 • Find another person to discuss the Tweets or Post-It-Notes about the CCSS question, concerns, and responses. • What new insights do you have about the CCSS?
  22. 22. 23 Goals of LDC  To engage students in reading, comprehending, analyzing, interpreting, and responding to complex texts  To hardwire assignments to the College and Career Readiness Standards within the CCSS and to promote collaboration  To help teachers personalize learning so that every student can master the CCSS  To ensure that all students can be college and career ready
  23. 23. Modules wrap a teaching plan around the task. Courses Modules Tasks • New courses • Existing coursesCourses 24
  24. 24. 25
  25. 25.  The bank of reading/writing tasks  The module template ◦ Tasks ◦ Skills ◦ Instruction ◦ Results  Scoring rubrics  Local and national collaboration  Access to a community of educators with LDC modules aligned to course content and to CCSS 26LDC Framework 10-17-11
  26. 26. 1. Argumentation 2. Informational/explanatory 3. Narrative 27LDC Framework 10-17-11
  27. 27. Task 1: [Insert optional question] After researching ________ (informational texts) on ________ (content), write ________ (an essay or substitute) in which you argue ________ (content). Support your position with evidence from your research. (Argumentation/Analysis) 28LDC Framework 10-17-11
  28. 28. You may choose one or more of these D’s (demands) to a Template Task to increase the challenge: D1 Be sure to acknowledge competing views. (Argumentation) D2 Give ____(one; #) example/s from past or current____( events; issues) to illustrate and clarify your position. (Argumentation or Informational/Explanatory) D3 What ________ (conclusions; implications) can you draw________? (Argumentation or Informational/Explanatory) D4 In your discussion, address the credibility and origin of sources in view of your research topic. (Argumentation or Informational/Explanatory) D5 Identify any gaps or unanswered questions. (Argumentation or Informational/Explanatory) D6 Use ________ (stylistic devices) to develop your work. (Argumentation or Informational/Explanatory or Narrative) D7 Use ________ (techniques) to convey multiple storylines. (Argumentation or Informational/Explanatory or Narrative) D8 Include ________ (e.g. bibliography, citations, references, endnotes). (Argumentation or Informational/Explanatory)
  29. 29.  Literature: novels, stories, poems, plays  Informational texts: newspaper articles, journal articles, primary source documents  Opinion pieces: editorials, speeches, essays on an issue  Reference works: encyclopedias, almanacs, manuals, how-to books 30
  30. 30.  For an essay, you might substitute a review, article, editorial, speech or proposal (“I propose amending Washington law to require schools to register students as voters on their 18th birthdays. That would be good policy because…”).  For a report, you might substitute an article, lab report or a manual.  For a narrative, you might substitute an article, account, biography, story or play script. 31
  31. 31.  Use exact wording of the template task  Determine if you will use L2 and L3.  Keep the exact CCSS Anchor Standards listed in the blank module because the alignment is already completed. Consider additional standards.  Add appropriate content standards.  Provide source information for the standards you use.  Use the exact rubric listed in the blank module. 32
  32. 32. Step 1: Work with a partner in your content area to identify content you want your students to go deeply into over the next marking period—roughly between 2 to 4 weeks. 33
  33. 33. Step 2: Decide if you want the students to argue, inform/explain, or narrate (text type) about the content: 34 Argumentation Informational/ Explanatory Narrative
  34. 34. Step 3: Decide the appropriate text structure (definition, description, procedural/sequential, synthesis, analysis, comparison, evaluation, problem-solution, cause-effect) for your text type. 35 Argumentation Informational/ Explanatory Narrative Definition Description Procedural-Sequential Synthesis Analysis Comparison Evaluation Problem-Solution Cause-Effect
  35. 35. Step 4: Type this URL into your browser: http://ldctraining.wikispaces.com/ Download the folder called “Day 1: Task Design” to your computer. Open the document titled “LDC-Template-Task-Collection-2-July- 20131”. 36 Argumentation Informational/ Explanatory Narrative Definition X Description X X Procedural-Sequential X X Synthesis X Analysis X X Comparison X X Evaluation X Problem-Solution X Cause-Effect X X
  36. 36. Step 5: Copy the appropriate task onto a blank word document and save it in a memorable location. 37 Argumentation Informational/ Explanatory Narrative Definition X Description X X Procedural-Sequential X X Synthesis X Analysis X X Comparison X X Evaluation X Problem-Solution X Cause-Effect X X
  37. 37.  Addresses content essential to the discipline, inviting students to engage deeply in thinking and literacy practices around that issue  Makes effective use of the template task’s writing type (argumentation, information/explanation or narrative)  Selects reading texts that use and develop academic/technical understanding and vocabulary 38
  38. 38.  Designs a writing prompt that requires sustained writing and effective use of ideas and evidence from the reading texts  Establishes a teaching task that is both challenging and feasible for students, with a balance of reading demands and writing demands that works well for the intended grade and content 39
  39. 39. Giving Outstanding Feedback:  Be specific about your warm feedback  Be specific about your cool feedback  Make your feedback actionable  Avoid evaluative language Receiving Feedback:  Use your feedback to revise and refine your Task a final time 40
  40. 40.  Directions ◦ Type this URL into your browser: http://literacy.psesd.org/ ◦ Download the folder called “Day 1: Task Design” to your computer. ◦ Open the document titled “LDC-Template-Task- Collection-2-July-20131”. ◦ Open the appropriate “BLANK LDC Template” (Argumentation, Informational/Explanatory, Narrative), and save as the title of your module in a place you can find it. ◦ Copy your task, paste it into the appropriate BLANK LDC Template, and fill in the blanks.
  41. 41.  Directions ◦ Open the appropriate “BLANK LDC Template” (Argumentation, Informational/Explanatory, Narrative), and save as the title of your module in a place you can find it. ◦ Copy your task, paste it into the appropriate BLANK LDC Template, and fill in the blanks.
  42. 42.  Go to https://www.edmodo.com/  Sign in or create an account  Join URL: edmo.do/j/t9zvmt or  Group Code: 4mvkid  Post your task in the post tab  Pick another task in your content area to give feedback
  43. 43.  How does this work (CCSS, LDC task design, etc.) resonate with your thinking?  What questions or concerns are still lingering about this work? Homework:  Review and refine your Task and be ready to publish it tomorrow morning.  Read through Sarah Ballute’s modulle “The British Industrial Revolution” 44
  44. 44. Develop a module for the next marking period that addresses  Engaging students in doing the task  Helping students develop and practice the skills they need to master your task  Addressing the CCSS instructional shifts
  45. 45.  As you watch the following video, describe the shifts in instruction?  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1cjxYR7G 6EI&feature=player_embedded/  How did Sarah  Engage students in doing the task?  Help students develop and practice the skills they need to master your task?  Address the CCSS instructional shifts?
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  47. 47.  To understand the Task and assignment  To read rigorous materials from different genre  To analyze their reading and synthesize it in preparation for writing  To write thoughtful and insightful pieces demonstrating their learning 48
  48. 48.  Preparing for the Task  Reading Process  Transition to Writing  Writing Process Does Sarah’s skills clusters address these major skills in her task? 49
  49. 49. Instructional ladder – outlines step-by-step what students will do (and what teachers will teach) to achieve the larger teaching task. 1. Skills list/clusters 2. Design mini-task for each skill 3. Instructional strategies and pacing 4. Scoring or checking for understanding Product 50
  50. 50. • SKILL: How do you engage students in reading and responding to challenging texts and writing challenging documents? • PRODUCT AND PROMPT: What product will the students produce to let you know you they are engaged? • INSTRUCTION: How do you facilitate that engagement? • Scoring; How will you check for understanding and keep track of the score? 51
  51. 51. Mini-tasks – a small or short assignment that engages students in learning each of the skills necessary to complete the task. Core Elements of Mini-Tasks 1. Prompt 2. Product 3. Scoring guide 4. Instruction 52
  52. 52. Using the Module Template provided, begin to create your module. Remember your module: • Should cover 2-4 weeks of study • Should be a major unit of your course • Should involve rigorous reading in varied genre • Should result in a major piece of writing • Should be made up of mini-tasks that are evaluated along the way 53
  53. 53. Please take time to fill out the Survey Monkey workshop feedback. We will use this feedback to adapt our next workshop to meet your needs. https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/W6FF8BZ Homework:  Implement your module between now and our next workshop, and be prepared to discuss  What you found working  Challenges you encountered and how you overcame them  Be prepared to bring scored or un-scored student work 54

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