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1|17-09-2015
Opportunities and challenges
in the multilingual and
multicultural learning space:
Kevin Haines
University of...
15/01/16 | 2
Principles and Practices at University of Groningen (UoG)
•  Research university, 5,000 international students, 25% study ...
International Classroom project at
University of Groningen: Why?
-  To obtain European quality label for
internationalisat...
Cultures in the international university
Räsänen (2011)
15/01/16 | 6
Person-in-Context
“A focus on , rather than
on learners as theoretical abstractions; a
focus on the agency of...
15/01/16 | 7
A state of becoming
”Intercultural competence is a
, rather than a
destination. Hence it is particularly
impo...
15/01/16 | 8
Making the familiar strange
I find it difficult
, for
the power of the familiar is
overwhelming.
Wisniewski 2...
9|17-09-2015
Opportunities and challenges in the
multilingual and multicultural learning space:
1.
IntlUni project: www.in...
What do we mean ….
Multilingual
?
Multicultural
?
Higher education teachers
and their students have
different first langua...
[Internationalisation of Higher
Education is] the
process of an
international, intercultural, or global
dimension into the...
INTERNATIONALISATION OF HIGHER EDUCATION 2
Internationalization at Home is the
of
international and intercultural
dimensio...
INTERNATIONALISATION OF HIGHER EDUCATION 3
Ø involves all students in a programme of
study.
Ø can be taught in any langu...
IntlUni Project 2012-2015
Dimension
(actor)
Focus on
activity
(process)
Quality principles (conditions)
1. Educational
context &
institutional
envir...
IntlUni Principles
Dimensions help us to think about our
different contexts e.g.
- Is there clear institutional support fo...
Dimension
(actor)
Focus on
activity
(process)
Quality principles (conditions)
1. Educational
context &
institutional
envir...
Dimension 1: The HEI
Providing an inclusive learning
space, e.g.
- Cooperation of all stakeholders
- Didactic training (de...
Illustrative sample
Example 1: The higher education institution
-  educational philosophy through the entire
university
- ...
Dimension 2:
The HE teacher
Raising awareness about teaching and learning
processes, e.g.
-  discussing the teaching and l...
Illustrative sample
Example 2: The teacher in higher education
-  explaining her teaching style at the beginning
of the se...
Dimension 3:
The HE student
Developing one’s own cultural identity and
extending one’s knowledge base, e.g.
-  encouraging...
Illustrative sample
Example 3: The student in higher education
-  integrating medical issues with cultural ones
-  student...
15/01/16
Enabling intercultural
dialogue and engagement (talk)
“I really liked the whole integration of culture
along with...
Foundation stones
(as a guiding attitude/
mindset)
of all students and all staff
on teaching and learning
processes
- Inte...
International Classroom project at
University of Groningen: How?
Building on research done elsewhere, notably in Australia...
International Classroom project at
University of Groningen: How?
International Classroom project at
University of Groningen: findings of pilots
›  vision on internationalisation at facult...
Language & Culture Policy
“A Language Policy of an Institution in Higher
Education should address issues at all levels of ...
Language Policy and Language Centres
“Whenever policy-related issues such
as language policy are discussed, LCs
are often ...
32|17-09-2015
Opportunities and challenges in the
multilingual and multicultural learning space:
THANK YOU FOR LISTENING
k...
Useful references and resources
Aerden, Axel. 2014. A Guide to Assessing the Quality of Internationalisation. European Con...
Useful references and resources
Council of Europe. 2001. The Common European Framework of Reference for Languages: Learnin...
Useful references and resources
Haines, Kevin & Anje Dijk. Forthcoming, 2016. Translating Language Policy into Practice: L...
Useful references and resources
Natri, Teija & Anne Räsänen. 2015. Developing a conceptual framework: the case of MAGICC. ...
Opportunities and Challenges in the Multilingual and Multicultural Learning Space: Principles and Practices by Dr Kevin Ha...
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Opportunities and Challenges in the Multilingual and Multicultural Learning Space: Principles and Practices by Dr Kevin Haines

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A presentation given at the 17th Association of University Language Centres Conference on 7th-8th January 2016.

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Opportunities and Challenges in the Multilingual and Multicultural Learning Space: Principles and Practices by Dr Kevin Haines

  1. 1. 1|17-09-2015 Opportunities and challenges in the multilingual and multicultural learning space: Kevin Haines University of Groningen The Netherlands k.b.j.haines@rug.nl
  2. 2. 15/01/16 | 2
  3. 3. Principles and Practices at University of Groningen (UoG) •  Research university, 5,000 international students, 25% study abroad •  > 120 nationalities •  35% ‘international’ academic staff •  107 Master’s, 21 Bachelor’s, 11 Joint programs in English •  good position in international rankings, proposed branch campus in China
  4. 4. International Classroom project at University of Groningen: Why? -  To obtain European quality label for internationalisation CeQuint; evidence of the added value of internationalisation (Aerden & Weber 2013; Aerden 2014) - To attract more international students and international staff - To create greater inclusion of all students and staff - To produce higher quality and more innovative education - To enhance international reputation and networks -  To achieve higher employability for all students (see also Wilkinson 2013 on Maastricht University)
  5. 5. Cultures in the international university Räsänen (2011)
  6. 6. 15/01/16 | 6 Person-in-Context “A focus on , rather than on learners as theoretical abstractions; a focus on the agency of the individual person as a thinking, feeling human being, with an identity, a personality, a unique history and background, a person with goals, motives and intentions…” Ushioda 2009: 220
  7. 7. 15/01/16 | 7 A state of becoming ”Intercultural competence is a , rather than a destination. Hence it is particularly important to pedagogies that will assist students to enter this state of becoming interculturally competent.” Leask 2015: 63
  8. 8. 15/01/16 | 8 Making the familiar strange I find it difficult , for the power of the familiar is overwhelming. Wisniewski 2000: 19
  9. 9. 9|17-09-2015 Opportunities and challenges in the multilingual and multicultural learning space: 1. IntlUni project: www.intluni.eu Intluni principles for quality teaching and learning (Cozart, Haines, Lauridsen & Vogel 2015) 2. IntlUni illustrative samples (Peckham & Kling 2015) International Classroom project at University of Groningen Language & Culture policy at University of Groningen
  10. 10. What do we mean …. Multilingual ? Multicultural ? Higher education teachers and their students have different first languages and cultural backgrounds. They come together in a space defined by its specific cultures and shared language(s). Karen Lauridsen 2015
  11. 11. [Internationalisation of Higher Education is] the process of an international, intercultural, or global dimension into the purpose, functions or delivery of post-secondary education, in order to enhance the quality of education and research for all students and staff, and to make a meaningful contribution to society. de Wit et al. 2015; based on definition by Knight 2004; 2012 INTERNATIONALISATION OF HIGHER EDUCATION 1
  12. 12. INTERNATIONALISATION OF HIGHER EDUCATION 2 Internationalization at Home is the of international and intercultural dimensions into the formal and informal curriculum for all students, within domestic learning environments. Beelen & Jones 2015: 12
  13. 13. INTERNATIONALISATION OF HIGHER EDUCATION 3 Ø involves all students in a programme of study. Ø can be taught in any language (not only in English). Ø may or may not involve mobile students. (EMI) and mobility are means to an end, that is, internationalisation of higher education. (see for example Airey et al 2015; Tange 2010; Wilkinson 2013)
  14. 14. IntlUni Project 2012-2015
  15. 15. Dimension (actor) Focus on activity (process) Quality principles (conditions) 1. Educational context & institutional environment : 1.  Institutional support for learning conducive environments 2.  Integrating students and staff in the institution 2. Educational processes 1.  Reflecting on teaching approaches and negotiating learning processes 2.  Managing and leveraging diversity 3. Educational outcomes 1.  Benefitting from awareness of cultural differences and the ability to deal with linguistic diversity 2.  Acquiring and applying contextual and intercultural knowledge to different cultural contexts
  16. 16. IntlUni Principles Dimensions help us to think about our different contexts e.g. - Is there clear institutional support for MMLS (vision, policy, philosophy, etc.)? - Is this institutional support matched by budgets? - Are teaching staff offered time/training in didactics across cultures? - Is there appropriate scaffolding of the students’ learning in the MMLS?
  17. 17. Dimension (actor) Focus on activity (process) Quality principles (conditions) 1. Educational context & institutional environment : 1.  Institutional support for learning conducive environments 2.  Integrating students and staff in the institution 2. Educational processes 1.  Reflecting on teaching approaches and negotiating learning processes 2.  Managing and leveraging diversity 3. Educational outcomes 1.  Benefitting from awareness of cultural differences and the ability to deal with linguistic diversity 2.  Acquiring and applying contextual and intercultural knowledge to different cultural contexts
  18. 18. Dimension 1: The HEI Providing an inclusive learning space, e.g. - Cooperation of all stakeholders - Didactic training (dealing with diversity) - Linguistic and cultural preparation - An inclusive and enabling language and culture policy
  19. 19. Illustrative sample Example 1: The higher education institution -  educational philosophy through the entire university -  creating a framework where educational experiences between students can be exchanged and shared -  assisting students to access existing communities and create new networks
  20. 20. Dimension 2: The HE teacher Raising awareness about teaching and learning processes, e.g. -  discussing the teaching and learning processes in the international classroom -  adjusting and individualizing teaching styles -  valuing knowledge and resources of all students -  foregrounding differences between national/ local and disciplinary cultures and knowledge systems
  21. 21. Illustrative sample Example 2: The teacher in higher education -  explaining her teaching style at the beginning of the seminar -  making her expectations clear i.e. oral participation and written assignments -  conferring with colleagues in the department with international teaching experience
  22. 22. Dimension 3: The HE student Developing one’s own cultural identity and extending one’s knowledge base, e.g. -  encouraging peer learning -  taking “otherness” into consideration -  using students from other countries as a resource -  extending course content and materials across borders -  designing interaction purposefully and explicitly
  23. 23. Illustrative sample Example 3: The student in higher education -  integrating medical issues with cultural ones -  students realizing that they are part of a multicultural group -  seeing and discussing issues from different angles and perspectives
  24. 24. 15/01/16 Enabling intercultural dialogue and engagement (talk) “I really liked the whole integration of culture along with the really real medical issue. It’s the end of life, how are you supposed to treat people, etcetera. Especially with the discussion later in the coach group meeting with all the different opinions, you really do realize, it’s true I am in a really international group right now.” Maja, 2nd Year Swedish Medical Bachelor’s student Haines 2015
  25. 25. Foundation stones (as a guiding attitude/ mindset) of all students and all staff on teaching and learning processes - Intercultural and linguistic - Managing and leveraging - Application of knowledge/learning in different
  26. 26. International Classroom project at University of Groningen: How? Building on research done elsewhere, notably in Australia (see International Education Association of Australia 2013 and Leask 2015) Adjusting the Questionnaire of Internationalisation of Curriculum and Principles of Teaching Across Cultures (Leask 2015; Carroll 2015) to Groningen context, and adding a language element (Lauridsen 2013) Applying the CeQuint accreditation parameters: vision, learning outcomes, teaching and learning, assessment, staff, students Writing case studies of “good practice” in 3 faculties, with recommendations for further developments and implementation
  27. 27. International Classroom project at University of Groningen: How?
  28. 28. International Classroom project at University of Groningen: findings of pilots ›  vision on internationalisation at faculty and programme level can be enhanced ›  high impact of Dutch culture (local, disciplinary, academic) ›  diversity can be used more as a resource ›  learning outcomes based on international frameworks but not explicitly global and intercultural ›  support required (tailor-made and integrated) for language and intercultural competences ›  important role for students (study associations)
  29. 29. Language & Culture Policy “A Language Policy of an Institution in Higher Education should address issues at all levels of the organisation (university, faculty, programmes, courses etc.) and be co-owned by all stakeholders and the whole university community (governing bodies, teaching, research, administrative staff and students)” CercleS Language Policy Position Statement 2011
  30. 30. Language Policy and Language Centres “Whenever policy-related issues such as language policy are discussed, LCs are often overlooked or their expertise is played down: they are not, or are involved too late, in drafting language policies.” Dijk, Engelen & Korebrits (2013: 360)
  31. 31. 32|17-09-2015 Opportunities and challenges in the multilingual and multicultural learning space: THANK YOU FOR LISTENING k.b.j.haines@rug.nl
  32. 32. Useful references and resources Aerden, Axel. 2014. A Guide to Assessing the Quality of Internationalisation. European Consortium for Accreditation in higher education. Aerden, Axel & Maria E. Weber. 2013. Frameworks for the Assessment of Quality in Internationalisation. European Consortium for Accreditation in higher education. Airey, John, Karen M. Lauridsen, Anne Rasanen, Linus Salo & Vera Schwach. 2015. The expansion of English-medium instruction in the Nordic countries: Can top-down university language policies encourage bottom-up disciplinary literacy goals? Higher Education (online), 1–16. http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10734-015-9950-2?wt_mc=internal.event.1.SEM.ArticleAuthorOnlineFirst (accessed 27 December 2015) Álvarez, Inma & Maria Luisa Pérez-Cavana. 2015. Multilingual and multicultural task-based learning scenarios: A pilot study from the MAGICC project. Language Learning in Higher Education 5(1), 59–82. Beelen, Jos & Elspeth Jones. 2015. Europe Calling: A New Definition for Internationalization at Home. International Higher Education 83. 12–13. Biggs, John. 1996. Enhancing teaching through constructive alignment. Higher Education, 32, 347-364. Carroll, Jude. 2015. Tools for Teaching in an Educationally Mobile World. Abingdon: Routledge. CercleS. 2011. Position Statement on Language Policy in Higher Education in Europe. http://www.acles.es/multimedia/enlaces/14/files/fichero_31.pdf (accessed 27 December 2015)
  33. 33. Useful references and resources Council of Europe. 2001. The Common European Framework of Reference for Languages: Learning, teaching, assessment. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Cozart, Stacey M., Kevin Haines, Karen M. Lauridsen & Thomas Vogel. 2015. The IntlUni principles for quality teaching and learning in the multilingual and multicultural learning space. In Lauridsen, Karen M. & Mette Kastberg Lillemose (eds), Opportunities and challenges in the multilingual and multicultural learning space. Final document of the IntlUni Erasmus Academic Network project 2012-15, 17–22. Aarhus: IntlUni. http://intluni.eu/uploads/media/The_opportunities_and_challenges_of_the_MMLS_Final_report_sept_2015.pdf (accessed 27 December 2015) Dijk, Anje, Christine Engelen & Liesbeth Korebrits. 2013. The changing world of higher education: Where do language centres fit in? Language Learning in Higher Education 3(2). 355–371. Lauridsen, Karen M. 2013. Higher Education Language Policy. Working Group under the European Language Council. European Journal of Language Policy 5(1). 128–138. Dimova, Slobodanka & Joyce Kling. 2015. Lecturers’ English Proficiency and University Language Polices for Quality Assurance. In Wilkinson, Robert & Mary Louise Walsh (Eds.), Integrating Content and Language in Higher Education: From Theory to Practice Selected Papers from the 2013 ICLHE Conference, 50–65. Frankfurt: Peter Language International Academic Publishers. Educational Support & Innovation (ESI). 2015. UTQ competences and requirements. Groningen: University of Groningen. http://www.rug.nl/science-and-society/centre-for-information-technology/education/teacher-development/ bkoregistratie/bko_kwaliteitseisen.pdf (accessed 27 December 2015)
  34. 34. Useful references and resources Haines, Kevin & Anje Dijk. Forthcoming, 2016. Translating Language Policy into Practice: Language and Culture Policy at a Dutch University. Language Learning in Higher Education. Haines, Kevin. 2015. Imagining oneself: Narrative evaluations of the professional identities of learners in a transnational higher-educational setting. Learning & Teaching 8(1). 30–49. Haines, Kevin, Wander Lowie, Petra Jansma & Nicole Schmidt. 2013. EMBEDding the CEFR in Academic Writing Assessment: A case study in training and standardization. Dutch Journal of Applied Linguistics 2(1). 77–91. International Education Association of Australia. 2013. Good Practice Principles in Practice: Teaching Across Cultures. IEAA. Language Policy Task Force (chaired by Frans Zwarts). 2014. RUG Language Policy: An Inclusive Dual-Plus Approach. Preparing world-class graduates and fostering our staff in a globalizing world. Groningen: University of Groningen. http://www.rug.nl/about-us/internationalization/international-classroom/RUG_Language_Policy.pdf (accessed 27 December 2015) Lauridsen, Karen M. 2013. Higher Education Language Policy. Working Group under the European Language Council. European Journal of Language Policy, 5(1), 128-138. Leask, Betty. 2015. Internationalizing the Curriculum. Abingdon: Routledge. MAGICC. 2015. MAGICC transparency tools. Brussels: European Commission, Lifelong Learning Programme. http://sepia.unil.ch/magicc/tools/ (accessed 27 December 2015)
  35. 35. Useful references and resources Natri, Teija & Anne Räsänen. 2015. Developing a conceptual framework: the case of MAGICC. In J. Jalkanen, E. Jokinen, & P. Taalas (Eds), Voices of pedagogical development - Expanding, enhancing and exploring higher education language learning, 85–102. Dublin: Research-publishing.net. Peckham, Don & Joyce Kling. 2015. Illustrative Samples of Good Practice in the Multilingual and Multicultural Learning Space (MMLS). In Lauridsen, Karen M. & Mette Kastberg Lillemose (eds), Opportunities and challenges in the multilingual and multicultural learning space. Final document of the IntlUni Erasmus Academic Network project 2012-15, 17–22. Aarhus: IntlUni. Smiskova, Hana, Kevin Haines & Estelle Meima. 2011. Key considerations for the quality of language provision for academic staff in the English-medium programmes (EMI) at a Dutch university. Fremdsprachen und Hochschule 83/84. 87–100. Tange, Hanne. 2010. Caught in the Tower of Babel: university lecturers’ experiences with internationalization. Language and Intercultural Communication 10(2). 137–149. Ushioda, Ema. 2009. A Person-in-Context relational View of Emergent Motivation Self and Identity. In Zoltan Dörnyei and Ema Ushioda (Eds): Motivation, Language Identity and the L2 Self. Bristol: Multilingual Matters, pp. 215–228. Wilkinson, Robert. 2013. English-medium instruction at a Dutch university: challenges and pitfalls, in Doiz, Aintzane, David Lasagabaster and Juan Manuel Sierra (eds), English-Medium Instruction at universities: Global Challenges, 3–26. Clevedon: Multilingual Matters. Wisniewski, Richard. 2000. The Averted Gaze, Anthropology & Education Quarterly 31(1). 5–23. de Wit, H.; F. Hunter; L. Howard; E. Egron-Polak. 2015. Internationalisation of Higher Education. Study requested by the European Parliament’s Committee on Culture and Education. http://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/etudes/STUD/2015/540370/ IPOL_STU(2015)540370_EN.pdf

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