Apps for publishers sept 2013

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Slides from a presentation given on 19 September 2013. An overview of the app publishing landscape plus some notes on interaction design.

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  • Massive shift in content distribution = rise of mobileRising tide it would be good to have a boat on
  • Mobile is eating the worldhttp://www.slideshare.net/bge20/2013-05-bea
  • Proliferation of devices [pic - multiple devices][chart: tablets overtaking ereaders]
  • [chart: tablets overtaking ereaders]
  • New distribution channels and revenue models (IAP, subs, crowdfunding)
  • Modes of usetime of day patterns - sofa vs out and about
  • Divergence between fiction and other publishing Linear narrative = solved problem = ebook is the universal container but ebooks are very poor for non-text content[percentages by sector]
  • Everything else: Picture books, childrens, education, etc... PDF = ubiquitous, but not mobile EPUB = “enhanced ebook”, pretender to standard Apps = where the money is, but no standardisation
  • Ecosystems
  • Ebook ecosystem - universal, portable format = growing rapidly (tho slowed somewhat by DRM)
  • App ecosystem... = Apple
  • Other stores exist - Android leads in device sales; but usage and monetization totally dominated by Apple Self-selecting
  • Restrictions on the market, eg. Apple will take 30% + VATYou can’t directly sell apps off your own website However - you can’t expect Apple to market your apps for you
  • storefront selling PDFs advantages with marketing, customer relationship
  • storefront selling PDFs advantages with marketing, customer relationship
  • vouchers in magazine world -> bundling, higher ARPU
  • Anatomy of an app
  • app storesnewsstand subs + vouchersIAPpush notificationsanalyticsdata capturesharing
  • app storesnewsstand subs + vouchersIAPpush notificationsanalyticsdata capturesharing
  • Up till now - biggest curb on small publishers moving into this market - skills gap - cost = building a new printing press for every book
  • Gartner hype -> tech becomes commodified
  • Beginning to happen: vendors = Inkling, Padify, Yudu, etc frameworks = Phonegap, Pugpig, etc
  • INTERACTION DESIGNNew skill for publishers
  • Books have interaction design dictated mostly by the constraints of printprogressremembersharing etc
  • Digital = we have to decide these things, they are not built in. Some of them have such obvious answers in print books that we might not think to ask them.
  • For the beginner, user experience design can look like - how do we decorate our content with a bit of interaction?
  • What does the user want to do? How can we make that easy and delightful?The answers to those question might be quite varied even for a single app.
  • For the beginner, user experience design can look like - how do we decorate our content with a bit of interaction?
  • For narrative - pretty easy. For magazines, often OK too - closed, limited journey. You can “do” a magazine.
  • Never how we read other types of books. Dip in and out. Look up a certain thing. Skip a topic we’re not that interested in. Choose our own path through the book.
  • Cookbook - modes of use= a better cookbook than print
  • Good Food magazine
  • Good Food magazine
  • Good Food magazine
  • Good Food magazine
  • Death of the pageThere is no fixed page sizeCannot build a practical workflow around fixed page sizes, if want to distribute to multiple devicesBuying once gives you app on all your (Apple) devices
  • PDF on a phone
  • Buying once gives you app on all your (Apple) devices
  • Here’s a really simple example
  • Rule of thumb - All pages are smaller [use dinos?]=> don’t need to show everything at once
  • Touch targets need to be large -> limits on what you can fit on a page
  • Progressive reveals
  • extra non-book things - use device capabilities
  • Workflow- are you going to build a new printing press for every book => need to build a scalable and practical workflow => work within constraints of your framework
  • Many good open source fonts
  • summary
  • Apps for publishers sept 2013

    1. 1. APPS FOR PUBLISHERS
    2. 2. What we’re going to cover 1. Overview of the app landscape 2. Product development for apps Refreshment break 3. Experience design for apps 4. Data and consumers 5. Getting started: next steps
    3. 3. The Landscape
    4. 4. Tablets and smartphones already selling 4x PCs
    5. 5. Google research
    6. 6. Tablets are eating ereaders Gartner forecasts (May 2013) 25m 15m 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 Units sold
    7. 7. New distribution channels and revenue models Global marketplace Recurring subscriptionsIn-App Purchase (IAP) Crowd funding
    8. 8. Tablet & smartphone Desktop web Peak usage 10pm9am
    9. 9. Fiction Everything else Picture books, travel guides, childrens, magazines, etc etc ebooks Fiction is diverging from other publishing ?
    10. 10. Ubiquitous format Fixed format - not suitable for phones Can’t directly sell in Appstore EPUB3 standardised but not widely adopted Limited functionality and customisation Reader apps (eg. iBooks) are a bit funky No standardisation – all special snowflakes Can work on all devices Must distribute through app stores More easily monetisable PDF EPUB3 APP
    11. 11. Ecosystems
    12. 12. Vibrant, growing ebook ecosystem (slightly hobbled by DRM)
    13. 13. The app ecosystem is Apple (mostly)
    14. 14. Mobile ecommerce traffic iPhone iPad Android phone 74% of download revenue on iOS Q1 2013 iOS Android App revenue
    15. 15. Playing by the Apple rules • Apple will take 30% + VAT • All apps are subject to an approval process • You can only sell apps through the Appstore • Consumer data capture is opt-in
    16. 16. Interesting loopholes You can’t open a rival Appstore. But you can open your own shopfront app. You can’t sell PDFs in the Appstore. But you can sell them through your own app. You can’t sell content in your app except through Apple. But you can give people access to content they have bought elsewhere. You can’t insist on getting user details. But you can offer discounts in exchange for user data.
    17. 17. Amber Military Books - storefront for PDFs
    18. 18. Advantages of storefront apps • Direct channel to customer through push notificationsSingle focus for marketingInitial technical investment reused over many content titlesSimple route to digitising existing content at low cost
    19. 19. Flexible pricing • Vary price over timeSet different “natural” prices in different territories, eg. 99c but 99p • More or less real-time
    20. 20. APP
    21. 21. (Worst case scenario) In-App Purchase Sharing iTunes Connect App Store Push notification Vouchers Analytics Data capture CMS Content updates Your app Email, Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest,... Other APIs ? Library Bookmarks Search
    22. 22. Sharing iTunes Connect App Store Analytics Your app Email, Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest,... Content
    23. 23. Device features Geolocatio n Motion Camera Touch Contacts Calendar Audio
    24. 24. A new printing press for every book The early days of app production
    25. 25. The technology Hype Cycle
    26. 26. From trough to slope Frameworks Platforms
    27. 27. A tipping point for app publishing • Reduced costs = lower risk, easier ROI • Returns creative control to publishers • Can begin to move beyond experiments, start thinking about sustainable workflows
    28. 28. Experience design
    29. 29. User experience design Industrial design Information architecture Communication design User interface engineering Usability engineering Human factors Human-computer interaction (HCI) Interaction design The overlapping disciplines of interaction design. New skills for publishers
    30. 30. Navigation Position Progress Sharing
    31. 31. How do I get to the next page? How long will it take to finish? Where am I? Is there a place I can stop coming up? How far have I got? How do I find what I’m looking for? How do I know what there is to look for? ? Am I missing something?
    32. 32. Experience design is not sugar for your medicine. Experience design is about user-centric thinking. “Let’s jazz up our content with a bit of interaction”
    33. 33. What does the user want to do? How can we make that easy and delightful?
    34. 34. For some content, the best interaction is very simple “Just keep swiping”
    35. 35. Linear narrative Short, closed journey A beginning and an end
    36. 36. Never how we read other types of books Dip in and out. Look up a certain thing. Skip a bit we’re not that interested in. Choose our own path through the book.
    37. 37. 1. Casual Picture gallery Favouriting 2. Selection Filter by: •ingredients •group size •time of day/year •formality •etc 3. Pre-cook Shopping list Scheduling 4. Cooking Step by step guide Instructional videos Conversions Timing 5.Afterwards Share (Pinterest, Instagram) Notes Next recipe? Cookbook
    38. 38. = a better cookbook than print?
    39. 39. PDFs on phones are rubbish Fixed layouts
    40. 40. iOS screen sizes Android You cannot build a practical workflow around fixed page sizes and distribute to multiple devices. Scrolling and responsive design solve this problem.
    41. 41. 1 2 3 1 2 3 Responsive design
    42. 42. Responsive design is a big, hard change for print designers Web designers are your friends WARNING
    43. 43. Device screens are mostly smaller
    44. 44. So keep tap targets large Fingers are fat
    45. 45. Progressive reveals Progressive reveals
    46. 46.
    47. 47. Text Video Great content Commodity technology Simple interaction The Wasteland app
    48. 48. You may need to re-licence or change fonts
    49. 49. It’s all about the user. What they want and when. Work with web designers. The page is dead. Scrolling is your friend. Don’t get too attached to your print fonts. You probably can’t afford them. Don’t overcomplicate. Keep your app as simple as it can be. * * * * * SUMMARY

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