Network Leadership in Australasian Tertiary Associations

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Network leadership

Dissemination within the sector continues to be problematic: Networks offer possibilities for helping to overcome some of the barriers

Network communication needs to be fit for purpose both in mode and message: consistency and the appropriate use of technology can support a sense of connection and development of a community of trust

Network leadership has emerged as a clear focus for inter-network collaboration: a paucity of research and resources in this area has also been identified

Sustainability is only a good outcome if the continuing network offers value to stakeholders

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Network Leadership in Australasian Tertiary Associations

  1. 1. Understanding  network   leadership  in  Australasian   Tertiary  Associations:    Communication  a  key  element    of  success   The  Network  of  Australasian  Tertiary   Association  (NATA)   1 Presented  by  Mike  Keppell,  Gordon  Suddaby,   Helen  Carter,  Caroline  Steel  
  2. 2. SYMPOSIUM OVERVIEW ¢  Introductions ¢  Background to the Network of Australasian Tertiary Associations (NATA) ¢  NATA key activities ¢  Emerging themes ¢  Communication —  ACODE Activity —  Ascilite Project ¢  Network ¢  Links Leadership & Resources 2
  3. 3. THE NETWORK OF AUSTRALASIAN TERTIARY ASSOCIATIONS ¢  National Networking project funded by the Office for Learning & Teaching ¢  Network leaders: Mike Keppell & Gordon Suddaby ¢  Network partners: ACODE, ascilite, CADAD, HERDSA, ODLAA, AARNet, NetSpot ¢  Key Foci: ¢  Member Engagement: ¢  Technologies & Communication ¢  Network Leadership 3
  4. 4. NETWORK ENGAGEMENT 1.  2.  3.  What networks are you currently a member of? With which do you feel most engaged with and why? What do you see as the value of belonging to such a network? 4
  5. 5. NATA ACTIVITIES ¢  Dissemination of the ALTC/OLT Good Practice Reports ¢  GPR eResource webinar launch ¢  NATA Research ¢  NATA Partner Projects: ¢  ¢  ¢  ¢  ¢  ACODE: Documenting a process and framework for scoping a contemporary issue of general concern including a simple how-to document and template for generating a briefing document Ascilite: Developing a guide to support and advance network engagement for members of professional associations and networks in the digital age CADAD: Developing an online professional development tool kit on engaging & adopting social media tools to enhance professional connectivity HERDSA: HERDSA Guide – Leading academic networks ODLAA: Developing a communication architecture that is attractive and offers value to professional organizations ¢  Engaging with other OLT networks ¢  Network Sustainability 5
  6. 6. EMERGING THEMES ¢  Dissemination within the sector continues to be problematic: Networks offer possibilities for helping to overcome some of the barriers ¢  Network communication needs to be fit for purpose both in mode and message: consistency and the appropriate use of technology can support a sense of connection and development of a community of trust ¢  Network leadership has emerged as a clear focus for inter-network collaboration: a paucity of research and resources in this area has also been identified ¢  Sustainability is only a good outcome if the continuing network offers value to stakeholders 6
  7. 7. COMMUNICATION: A CRITICAL ELEMENT 7
  8. 8. ACODE ACTIVITY ¢  ACODE Project; A Sector-Wide Approach to Institutional Media Management. ¢  NATA Partner Project; Engaging Network Members: A NATA case study of a Contemporary Tertiary Sector Issue Project Members •  ACODE team: Ric Canale, Alan Arnold, David Green •  Reference group: Helen Carter, Susan Stoney, James Sankar, Philip Uys 8
  9. 9. PROJECT OVERVIEW o  Use ACODE’s Media Management project as a case study o  Engage members and develop a guide to a contemporary issue. o  Key elements for engaging network members, the factors required to jointly investigate and to collectively write a briefing document in a timely fashion. 9
  10. 10. RELEVANCE TO OTHER NETWORKS Institution ACODE, CAUL, CAUDIT et al. Institutional governance processes Institutional policy, systems and processes Councils & Assoc. Institutional members Sector-wide scoping of issues Discrete perspectives & guidelines Nationalregional Associations, agencies, other? National governance processes National policy, systems and processes 10 10
  11. 11. WHY NOW, WHY THIS PROJECT? The Media Management problem is subject to the same drivers for closer national/regional networking: o  Wider social change driving institutional change o  Breaking down of silos within institutions o  Growing need for collaboration among institutions o  Advances in the management of technologies • E.g. Managed services, LTI, Use of OER & proprietary content 11 11
  12. 12. ASCILITE PROJECT Guide to support and advance network engagement for members of professional associations and networks in the digital age. Dr Dom Parrish and Liz Greener 12
  13. 13. PROJECT OVERVIEW ¢  Environmental scan/literature review ¢  Interviews with 14 key practitioners across NATA - ascilite, HERDSA, ODLAA, CADAD and NetSpot ¢  Development of guide that will outline design principles and engagement strategies for the use of web based resources ¢  Dissemination of the Guide with NATA partners ¢  Embedding of good practice in ascilite communication and engagement renewal strategies 13
  14. 14. INITIAL FINDINGS Early findings: —  —  —  Capitalise on existing activities Explicit purpose, facilitated engagement Issues of time, relevance and importance “The world has moved on from having a private sort of password protected area for members to collaborate”   “Looking at what benefits us as individuals and our personal learning networks.”  Early feedback: —  —  —  —  “Simple, intuitive, easy to use” “My primary tool at the moment in professional engagement and keeping up with the developments is twitter.”  “Digging deeper into topical issues is through blogs.” “Webinars are particularly valuable for again getting access to key individuals.” Lists of technologies and their affordances in our context. —  Yammer, Deigo, Pinterest, slideshare, aggregators etc. 14
  15. 15. ‘ Collaboration approaches & tools Personal Learning Environments Professional Association Communication networks & tools 15
  16. 16. UNDERSTANDING GOOD PRACTICE IN NETWORK LEADERSHIP How do you understand network leadership? Are you or have you been a network leader? Are you a member of a network? 1.  2.  3.  What do you see as the key functions or role of network leaders? What do you see as the key challenges in effective network leadership? What examples can you provide of good practice in network leadership? 16
  17. 17. NETWORK LEADERSHIP ¢  Principles for Good Practice in Network Leadership ¢  HERDSA Guide – To be launched in 2014 Ch. 1. About academic networks ¢  Ch. 2. The role of the network leader ¢  Ch. 3. The strategic network leader ¢  Ch. 4. Network management ¢  Ch. 5. Developing your network engagement strategy ¢  Ch. 6. Finishing your term as network leader ¢  ¢  Tips for leading academic networks guide – 4 page briefing document ¢  Three phases of academic network leadership 17
  18. 18. THE NETWORK OF AUSTRALASIAN TERTIARY ASSOCIATIONS Mission: Improving engagement and practice through network leadership 18
  19. 19. LINKS & RESOURCES ¢  NATA Blog: www.nataonthenet.blogspot.com ¢  ALTC/OLT Good Practice Reports: http://www.olt.gov.au/resource-library/good-practicereports ¢  Tips for leading academic networks guide To register to participate in the Good Practice Report eResource launch webinar, email Natasha.Hard@usq.edu.au with the subject ‘NATA GPR Webinar’. Acknowledgement: This presentation was informed by the work of the Network of Australasian Tertiary Associations with funding provided by the Australian Government Office for Learning and Teaching. The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect the views of the Australian Government Office for Learning and Teaching. 19

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