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Explora(ons	
  and	
  Evalua(on	
  Within	
  the	
  
Handbook	
  of	
  Research	
  on	
  K-­‐12	
  Online	
  
and	
  Blend...
•  Introduc(on	
  &	
  brief	
  overview	
  of	
  Handbook	
  
•  Featured	
  chapters	
  
•  What	
  else	
  is	
  in	
  ...
•  How	
  did	
  this	
  happen?	
  
•  What	
  it	
  is	
  and	
  what	
  it	
  isn’t	
  
•  Carnegie	
  Mellon’s	
  ETC	...
Organiza1on	
  of	
  Handbook	
  
I.  A	
  Background	
  and	
  Historical	
  Perspec(ve	
  
II.  Research	
  on	
  Learni...
Structure	
  of	
  the	
  chapters	
  
I.  Introduc(on	
  
II.  Research	
  Synthesis	
  
III.  Implica(ons	
  for	
  Poli...
I.  A	
  Background	
  and	
  Historical	
  Perspec(ve	
  
1.  A	
  History	
  of	
  K-­‐12	
  Online	
  and	
  Blended	
 ...
II.	
  Research	
  on	
  Learning	
  and	
  Learners	
  
1.  Research	
  on	
  At-­‐Risk	
  Learners	
  in	
  K-­‐12	
  On...
III.	
  K-­‐12	
  Learning	
  in	
  Content	
  Domains	
  
1.  Few	
  in	
  Number:	
  Research	
  on	
  Mathema(cal	
  
T...
IV.	
  Research	
  on	
  Teaching	
  
1.  Teacher	
  Prepara(on	
  for	
  K-­‐12	
  Online	
  and	
  Blended	
  
Learning	...
V.	
  Research	
  on	
  the	
  Role	
  of	
  the	
  Other	
  
1.  School	
  Administrators	
  and	
  K-­‐12	
  Online	
  a...
VI.	
  	
  Research	
  on	
  Technological	
  Innova(ons	
  
1.  K-­‐12	
  Mobile	
  Learning	
  –	
  Cathy	
  Cavanaugh,	...
Explora(ons	
  and	
  Evalua(on	
  Within	
  the	
  
Handbook	
  of	
  Research	
  on	
  K-­‐12	
  Online	
  
and	
  Blend...
Chapter	
  2:	
  History	
  of	
  K-­‐12	
  Online	
  and	
  
Blended	
  Instruc(on	
  Worldwide	
  
Michael	
  K.	
  Barb...
Chapter	
  2:	
  History	
  of	
  K-­‐12	
  Online	
  and	
  
Blended	
  Instruc(on	
  Worldwide	
  
“Mike,	
  if	
  you	
...
•  There	
  are	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  things	
  interna(onally	
  that	
  
are	
  the	
  same	
  as	
  what	
  we	
  see	
 ...
Consistencies	
  Between	
  the	
  	
  
Interna(onal	
  and	
  American	
  Contexts	
  
1.  The	
  evolu(on	
  of	
  K-­‐1...
Inconsistencies	
  Between	
  the	
  	
  
Interna(onal	
  and	
  American	
  Contexts	
  
1.  In	
  many	
  interna(onal	
...
Leanna	
  Archambault	
  
Arizona	
  State	
  University	
  
leanna.Archambault@asu.edu	
  
	
  
Kathryn	
  Kennedy	
  
Mi...
Chapter	
  10:	
  Teacher	
  Prepara(on	
  	
  
for	
  K-­‐12	
  Online	
  &	
  Blended	
  Learning	
  
Theore(cal	
  Fram...
Relevant	
  standards	
  for	
  online	
  and	
  blended	
  teaching	
  
•  Southern	
  Regional	
  Educa(on	
  Board	
  (...
Research	
  Synthesis	
  (pre-­‐service)	
  
•  Teacher	
  Educa(on	
  Goes	
  Into	
  Virtual	
  Schooling	
  –	
  
Iowa	...
Implica(ons	
  for	
  policy	
  &	
  prac(ce	
  
•  Aligning	
  curriculum	
  in	
  teacher	
  educa(on	
  with	
  
standa...
Implica(ons	
  for	
  policy	
  &	
  prac(ce	
  (cont)	
  	
  
•  Laying	
  policy	
  groundwork	
  within	
  states	
  
•...
Implica(ons	
  for	
  research	
  
•  Longitudinal	
  studies	
  for	
  teacher	
  prepara(on	
  
•  Valida(on	
  of	
  st...
On-­‐site	
  and	
  online	
  facilitators:	
  Current	
  and	
  
future	
  direc(on	
  for	
  Research	
  	
  
Jered	
  B...
On-­‐site	
  Mentors	
  	
  
Full-­‐(me	
  Programs	
  	
  
History	
  English	
  Math	
  Science	
  
Online	
  Mentors	
  	
  
History	
  English	
  Math	
  Science	
  
Online	
  Mentors	
  	
  
History	
  English	
  Math	
  Science	
  
Online	
  Mentors	
  	
  	
  
History	
  English	
  Math	
  Science	
  
Online	
  Mentors	
  	
  
History	
  English	
  Math	
  Science	
  
Mentor	
  	
  
What	
  are	
  mentor	
  responsibili(es?	
  	
  
Ensure	
  that	
  “everything	
  is	
  
working	
  smooth...
What	
  are	
  mentor	
  responsibili(es?	
  	
  
1.  Encouraging	
  Interac(ons	
  and	
  fostering	
  
rela(onships	
  	...
Do	
  mentors	
  impact	
  student	
  
performance?	
  	
  
Yes,	
  when	
  they	
  receive	
  adequate	
  professional	
 ...
Implica(ons	
  
•  Mentors	
  need	
  professional	
  development	
  and	
  
(me	
  
•  We	
  need	
  more	
  research	
  ...
Lisa	
  Hasler	
  Waters	
  
Technology	
  Integra(on	
  Flint	
  High	
  School	
  
haslerwaters@gmail.com	
  	
  
	
  
M...
The	
  study	
  
•  Lots	
  of	
  research	
  on	
  parent	
  involvement	
  in	
  
tradi(onal	
  seangs	
  
•  Scant	
  i...
Seangs	
  are	
  ill-­‐defined	
  
Parental	
  involvement	
  defined	
  
•  Parent,	
  caregiver,	
  or	
  guardian	
  as	
  primary	
  
support	
  for	
  K-...
Factors	
  influencing	
  involvement	
  
•  School	
  policies	
  unclear,	
  inconsistent,	
  or	
  non-­‐
existent	
  
•...
Student	
  achievement	
  
•  Some	
  links	
  to	
  achievement	
  exist	
  but	
  they	
  are	
  
not	
  clear	
  given	...
Implica(ons	
  for	
  Policy	
  
•  Need	
  to	
  provide	
  effec(ve	
  training	
  and	
  support	
  
•  Need	
  to	
  en...
State	
  of	
  current	
  research	
  
•  Lots	
  needs	
  to	
  be	
  done	
  
•  Li]le	
  is	
  generalizable	
  
Cathy	
  Cavanaugh	
  
Microsor	
  Worldwide	
  Educa(on	
  
Cathy.cavanaugh@microsor.com	
  	
  
	
  
Dorit	
  Maor	
  
M...
Always mobile, always moving
Collaborate early, often, and always
Grown up on social networks
THE MODERN
STUDENT
LEARNING
TOGETHER
In m-learning,
students co-created
knowledge
COLLABORATION
LEARNING MY
WAY
In m-learning,
students had
flexibility to design
their learning
experiences
PERSONALIZATION
LEARNING
EVERYWHERE
ANYTIME
In m-learning,
students expanded
learning time and
were more
reflective and
independent
learne...
LEADING
LEARNING
WITH VISION
In effective m-
learning, leaders
use a holistic
approach, build
educator capacity,
and lever...
LEARNING
INFORMED BY
EVIDENCE
M-learning
requires
sustainable
research to guide
pedagogical
models, apps, and
assessments ...
Wendy	
  Drexler	
  
ISTE	
  
wdrexler@gmail.com	
  	
  
	
  
Chapter	
  20:	
  Personal	
  Learning	
  	
  
Environments	...
Chapter	
  20:	
  Personal	
  Learning	
  	
  
Environments	
  in	
  K-­‐12	
  	
  
•  What	
  we	
  hope	
  to	
  see…	
  
•  Do	
  you	
  see	
  something	
  missing?	
  
•  Any	
  studies	
  that	
  are	...
•  This	
  is	
  not	
  a	
  completed	
  product	
  
•  Instead	
  it	
  is	
  a	
  flowing	
  conversa(on	
  
•  Join	
  ...
Ques(ons?	
  
Handbook	
  email	
  –	
  handbookresearch@gmail.com	
  	
  	
  
Rick	
  Ferdig	
  –	
  rferdig@gmail.com	
 ...
SITE 2015 – Explorations and Evolution within the Handbook of Research on K-12 Online and Blended Learning
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SITE 2015 – Explorations and Evolution within the Handbook of Research on K-12 Online and Blended Learning

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Ferdig, R. E., Kennedy, K., Barbour, M. K., Archambault, L., Menchaca, M., Borup, J., Cavanaugh, C., & Drexler, W. (2015, March). Explorations and evolution within the handbook of research on K-12 online and blended learning. A panel presentation at annual conference for the Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education, Las Vegas, NV.

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SITE 2015 – Explorations and Evolution within the Handbook of Research on K-12 Online and Blended Learning

  1. 1. Explora(ons  and  Evalua(on  Within  the   Handbook  of  Research  on  K-­‐12  Online   and  Blended  Learning   Rick  Ferdig,  Kent  State  University   Kathryn  Kennedy,  Michigan  Virtual  University   Michael  K.  Barbour,  Sacred  Heart  University     Leanna  Archambault,  Arizona  State  University   Jered  Borup,  George  Mason  University   Mike  Menchaca,  University  of  Hawaii   Cathy  Cavanaugh,  Microso=   Wendy  Drexler,  ISTE  
  2. 2. •  Introduc(on  &  brief  overview  of  Handbook   •  Featured  chapters   •  What  else  is  in  the  Handbook   •  Next  steps   •  Ques(ons?   Agenda  
  3. 3. •  How  did  this  happen?   •  What  it  is  and  what  it  isn’t   •  Carnegie  Mellon’s  ETC  Press   •  Publica(on:  Nov  2014   •  Updated  every  year   •  Open  access   About  the  Handbook  
  4. 4. Organiza1on  of  Handbook   I.  A  Background  and  Historical  Perspec(ve   II.  Research  on  Learning  and  Learners   III.  K-­‐12  Learning  in  Content  Domains   IV.  Research  on  Teaching   V.  Research  on  the  Role  of  the  Other   VI.  Research  on  Technological  Innova(ons  
  5. 5. Structure  of  the  chapters   I.  Introduc(on   II.  Research  Synthesis   III.  Implica(ons  for  Policy  and  Prac(ce   IV.  Implica(ons  for  Research   V.  Conclusion   VI.  References  
  6. 6. I.  A  Background  and  Historical  Perspec(ve   1.  A  History  of  K-­‐12  Online  and  Blended  Instruc(on  in   the  U.S.  –  John  Watson  &  Amy  Murin   2.  History  of  K-­‐12  Online  and  Blended  Instruc(on   Worldwide  –  Michael  Barbour   3.  Research  &  History  of  Policies  in  K-­‐12  Online  and   Blended  Learning  –  Kerry  Rice   4.  A  Brief  Look  at  Methodologies  used  in  the  Research   on  K-­‐12  Online  Teaching  and  Learning  –  Susan   Lowes  
  7. 7. II.  Research  on  Learning  and  Learners   1.  Research  on  At-­‐Risk  Learners  in  K-­‐12  Online   Learning  –  Jeanne  Repe]o  and  Carrie  Spitler   2.  Reviewing  a  Decade  (2004-­‐2014)  of  Published,   Peer-­‐reviewed  Research  on  Online  Learning  and   Students  with  Disabili(es  –  Diana  Greer,  Mary  Rice,   and  Brian  Dykman  
  8. 8. III.  K-­‐12  Learning  in  Content  Domains   1.  Few  in  Number:  Research  on  Mathema(cal   Teaching  and  Learning  in  the  Online  Seang  –  Karl   Kosko,  Lauren  McMahon,  &  Md  Amiruzzaman   2.  Research  on  Literacy  Instruc(on  and  Learning  in   Virtual,  Blended,  and  Hybrid  Environments  –  Kristy   Pytash  and  W.  Ian  O’Byrne   3.  Research  on  Teaching  Blended  and  Online  Physical   Educa(on  –  David  Daum  and  Craig  Buschner    
  9. 9. IV.  Research  on  Teaching   1.  Teacher  Prepara(on  for  K-­‐12  Online  and  Blended   Learning  –  Leanna  Archambault  and  Kathryn   Kennedy   2.  Professional  Development  for  K-­‐12  Online  Teachers   –  Kara  Dawson  and  Nancy  Fichtman  Dana   3.  Mentoring  Online  Teachers  –  Kara  Dawson  and   Nancy  Fichtman  Dana  
  10. 10. V.  Research  on  the  Role  of  the  Other   1.  School  Administrators  and  K-­‐12  Online  and  Blended   Learning  –  Sco]  McLeod  and  Jayson  Richardson   2.  Parental  Involvement  in  K-­‐12  Online  and  Blended   Learning  –  Lisa  Hasler-­‐Waters,  Mike  Menchaca,  and   Jered  Borup   3.  On-­‐site  and  Online  Facilitators:  Current  and  Future   Direc(on  for  Research  –  Jered  Borup  and  Jeff  Drysdale   4.  The  Role  of  the  School  Psychologist  in  K-­‐12  Online  and   Blended  Learning  –  P.  Dawn  Tysinger,  Jeff  Tysinger,  and   Terry  Diamanduros   5.  K-­‐12  Online  and  Blended  Learning,  School  Libraries,  and   School  Librarians  –  Brenda  Boyer  and  Rebecca  Kelly    
  11. 11. VI.    Research  on  Technological  Innova(ons   1.  K-­‐12  Mobile  Learning  –  Cathy  Cavanaugh,  Dorit   Maor,  and  Aidan  McCarthy   2.  Open  Learning  in  K-­‐12  Online  and  Blended  Learning   Environments  –  Lee  Graham,  Randy  LaBonte,   Verena  Roberts,  Ian  O’Byrne,  and  Colin  Osterhout   3.  Personal  Learning  Environments  in  K-­‐12  –  Wendy   Drexler    
  12. 12. Explora(ons  and  Evalua(on  Within  the   Handbook  of  Research  on  K-­‐12  Online   and  Blended  Learning   Author  Introduc(ons:     Michael  K.  Barbour,  Sacred  Heart  University     Leanna  Archambault,  Arizona  State  University   Jered  Borup,  George  Mason  University   Mike  Menchaca,  University  of  Hawaii   Cathy  Cavanaugh,  Microso=   Wendy  Drexler,  ISTE  
  13. 13. Chapter  2:  History  of  K-­‐12  Online  and   Blended  Instruc(on  Worldwide   Michael  K.  Barbour   Sacred  Heart  University   mkbarbour@gmail.com      
  14. 14. Chapter  2:  History  of  K-­‐12  Online  and   Blended  Instruc(on  Worldwide   “Mike,  if  you  were  explaining  what  is   happening  in  K-­‐12  online  and  blended   learning  outside  of  the  United  States  to   someone,  what  are  the  two  or  three  or  four   things  you’d  want  them  to  know?”  
  15. 15. •  There  are  a  lot  of  things  interna(onally  that   are  the  same  as  what  we  see  in  the  United   States,  and   •  There  are  a  lot  of  things  interna(onally  that   are  quite  different  than  what  we  see  in  the   United  States!   Chapter  2:  History  of  K-­‐12  Online  and   Blended  Instruc(on  Worldwide  
  16. 16. Consistencies  Between  the     Interna(onal  and  American  Contexts   1.  The  evolu(on  of  K-­‐12  distance  educa(on  from  correspondence   educa(on  to  various  media  (e.g.,  radio,  instruc(onal  television,   telema(cs,  videoconferencing,  etc.)  to  online.   2.  Many  of  the  early  K-­‐12  online  learning  programs  were  created   through  grants  provided  by  the  federal  or  individual  state   governments,  which  is  consistent  with  the  experience.   3.  Terms  such  as  supplemental  and  full-­‐(me,  as  well  as  district-­‐ based  and  state-­‐wide  (could  be  na(on-­‐wide  or  province-­‐wide,   depending  on  the  jurisdic(on)  are  all  consistently  used  to  describe   K-­‐12  online  and  blended.   Chapter  2:  History  of  K-­‐12  Online  and   Blended  Instruc(on  Worldwide  
  17. 17. Inconsistencies  Between  the     Interna(onal  and  American  Contexts   1.  In  many  interna(onal  jurisdic(ons  there  is  s(ll  a  significant  use  of   correspondence  educa(on,  audio  distance  educa(on,  and  video   conferencing.   2.  Interna(onally  the  primary  driver  of  K-­‐12  online  and  blended   learning  are  government  forces,  and  corpora(ons  are  largely   contractors  that  provide  content,  learning  technologies,  and  other   services  to  these  government-­‐run  programs.  There  are  few,  if  any,   proponents  of  the  applica(on  of  free  market  principles  to  public   educa(on  through  K-­‐12  online  and  blended  learning.     3.  In  most  countries  K-­‐12  online  and  blended  learning  is  primarily   used  at  the  secondary  level.  Even  the  use  of  K-­‐12  distance   educa(on  in  general  is  largely  focused  on  the  secondary  grades.     4.  As  corpora(ons  and  free  market  proponents  are  largely  absent,   blended  learning  –  and  even  online  learning  –  is  generally   regarded  as  the  next  evolu(on  of  effec(ve  technology  integra(on.   Chapter  2:  History  of  K-­‐12  Online  and   Blended  Instruc(on  Worldwide  
  18. 18. Leanna  Archambault   Arizona  State  University   leanna.Archambault@asu.edu     Kathryn  Kennedy   Michigan  Virtual  University   kkennedy@mivu.org       Chapter  10:  Teacher  Prepara(on     for  K-­‐12  Online  &  Blended  Learning  
  19. 19. Chapter  10:  Teacher  Prepara(on     for  K-­‐12  Online  &  Blended  Learning   Theore(cal  Framework   •  TPACK   •  Situated  cogni(on   •  Cogni(ve  appren(ceship  
  20. 20. Relevant  standards  for  online  and  blended  teaching   •  Southern  Regional  Educa(on  Board  (SREB)   •  Na(onal  Educa(on  Associa(on  (NEA)   •  Interna(onal  Society  for  Technology  in  Educa(on   (ISTE)   •  iNACOL  Online  Teaching  Standards  &  Blended   Teaching  Competencies   •  Quality  Ma]ers   Chapter  10:  Teacher  Prepara(on     for  K-­‐12  Online  &  Blended  Learning  
  21. 21. Research  Synthesis  (pre-­‐service)   •  Teacher  Educa(on  Goes  Into  Virtual  Schooling  –   Iowa  State  (Davis,  et  al.,  2009)   •  University  of  Florida  virtual  school  experiences   (Kennedy,  Cavanaugh,  &  Dawson,  2013)   •  Survey  of  teacher  educa(on  programs  –  1.3%   preparing  teachers  for  K-­‐12  OBL  (Kennedy  &   Archambault,  2012)   •  Design  of  field  experiences  (Kennedy  &   Archambault,  2012)     Chapter  10:  Teacher  Prepara(on     for  K-­‐12  Online  &  Blended  Learning  
  22. 22. Implica(ons  for  policy  &  prac(ce   •  Aligning  curriculum  in  teacher  educa(on  with   standards  for  online  teaching   •  Designing  coursework  in  online  pedagogy,   desgigning  and  implemen(ng  instruc(on,   assessment  and  evalua(on     •  Incorpora(ng  field  experience  to  expose  teachers  to   the  new  environments   •  Fostering  collabora(ons  between  online/blended   schools  and  teacher  educa(on   Chapter  10:  Teacher  Prepara(on     for  K-­‐12  Online  &  Blended  Learning  
  23. 23. Implica(ons  for  policy  &  prac(ce  (cont)     •  Laying  policy  groundwork  within  states   •  Endorsement  work  across  states   •  Acknowledgement  from  accredita(on   organiza(ons   Chapter  10:  Teacher  Prepara(on     for  K-­‐12  Online  &  Blended  Learning  
  24. 24. Implica(ons  for  research   •  Longitudinal  studies  for  teacher  prepara(on   •  Valida(on  of  standards   •  Empirical  defini(ons  of  skills  and  techniques  for   effec(ve  online  teaching   Chapter  10:  Teacher  Prepara(on     for  K-­‐12  Online  &  Blended  Learning  
  25. 25. On-­‐site  and  online  facilitators:  Current  and   future  direc(on  for  Research     Jered  Borup   George  Mason  University   @jeredborup   learntech.gmu.edu   jborup@gmu.edu       Jeff  Drysdale     Brigham  Young  University      
  26. 26. On-­‐site  Mentors    
  27. 27. Full-­‐(me  Programs     History  English  Math  Science  
  28. 28. Online  Mentors     History  English  Math  Science  
  29. 29. Online  Mentors     History  English  Math  Science  
  30. 30. Online  Mentors       History  English  Math  Science  
  31. 31. Online  Mentors     History  English  Math  Science  
  32. 32. Mentor     What  are  mentor  responsibili(es?     Ensure  that  “everything  is   working  smoothly”       (Hannum  et  al.  2008)  
  33. 33. What  are  mentor  responsibili(es?     1.  Encouraging  Interac(ons  and  fostering   rela(onships     2.  Monitoring  and  mo(va(ng  student   engagement   3.  Instruc(ng  
  34. 34. Do  mentors  impact  student   performance?     Yes,  when  they  receive  adequate  professional   development  and  (me  to  fulfill  their   responsibili(es.        
  35. 35. Implica(ons   •  Mentors  need  professional  development  and   (me   •  We  need  more  research    
  36. 36. Lisa  Hasler  Waters   Technology  Integra(on  Flint  High  School   haslerwaters@gmail.com       Michael  P.  Menchaca   University  of  Hawaii  at  Manoa   mikepm@hawaii.edu       Jered  Borup   George  Mason  University   jborup@gmu.edu       Chapter  14:  Parental  Involvement  in  K-­‐12   Online  and  Blended  Learning  
  37. 37. The  study   •  Lots  of  research  on  parent  involvement  in   tradi(onal  seangs   •  Scant  in  blended  in  online  seangs   •  Large  gaps  in  many  areas   •  We  reviewed  as  much  as  we  could  find  
  38. 38. Seangs  are  ill-­‐defined  
  39. 39. Parental  involvement  defined   •  Parent,  caregiver,  or  guardian  as  primary   support  for  K-­‐12  student  in  defined  seangs   •  Prac(ces  of  these  parents   •  Typically   – Responsible  only  for  their  own  children   – Not  employed  by  school   – Support  provided  away  from  campus  
  40. 40. Factors  influencing  involvement   •  School  policies  unclear,  inconsistent,  or  non-­‐ existent   •  Parents  in  these  environments  might  already   tend  to  be  more  involved   •  Students  value  parental  involvement  but  that   is  not  always  evident  to  parents   •  Parents  get  more  involved  when  students   struggle  than  when  they  do  well  
  41. 41. Student  achievement   •  Some  links  to  achievement  exist  but  they  are   not  clear  given  the  uniqueness  of  seangs   •  Parents  need  support  in  both  skills  and   knowledge  
  42. 42. Implica(ons  for  Policy   •  Need  to  provide  effec(ve  training  and  support   •  Need  to  encourage  involvement  and  (e  to   student  mo(va(on   •  Need  to  ar(culate  and  communicate   guidelines  concerning  roles  and   responsibili(es  
  43. 43. State  of  current  research   •  Lots  needs  to  be  done   •  Li]le  is  generalizable  
  44. 44. Cathy  Cavanaugh   Microsor  Worldwide  Educa(on   Cathy.cavanaugh@microsor.com       Dorit  Maor   Murdoch  University   d.maor@murdoch.edu.au       Aidan  McCarthy   Microsor  Worldwide  Educa(on   Aidan.mccarthy@microsor.com       Chapter  18:  K–12  Mobile  Learning  
  45. 45. Always mobile, always moving Collaborate early, often, and always Grown up on social networks THE MODERN STUDENT
  46. 46. LEARNING TOGETHER In m-learning, students co-created knowledge COLLABORATION
  47. 47. LEARNING MY WAY In m-learning, students had flexibility to design their learning experiences PERSONALIZATION
  48. 48. LEARNING EVERYWHERE ANYTIME In m-learning, students expanded learning time and were more reflective and independent learners INDEPENDENCE
  49. 49. LEADING LEARNING WITH VISION In effective m- learning, leaders use a holistic approach, build educator capacity, and leverage data for insight – This is a global challenge LEADERSHIP
  50. 50. LEARNING INFORMED BY EVIDENCE M-learning requires sustainable research to guide pedagogical models, apps, and assessments for personalized, collaborative, independent learning DESIGN
  51. 51. Wendy  Drexler   ISTE   wdrexler@gmail.com       Chapter  20:  Personal  Learning     Environments  in  K-­‐12    
  52. 52. Chapter  20:  Personal  Learning     Environments  in  K-­‐12    
  53. 53. •  What  we  hope  to  see…   •  Do  you  see  something  missing?   •  Any  studies  that  are  not  referenced  that   should  be  within  each  chapter?   •  Proposals  for  next  year’s  chapters   •  Email  handbookresearch@gmail.com     What’s  missing?  
  54. 54. •  This  is  not  a  completed  product   •  Instead  it  is  a  flowing  conversa(on   •  Join  the  conversa(on  by  proposing  a  future   chapter!   •  Each  sec(on  has  room  for  growth  in   •  Prac(ce   •  Policy     •  Research   Moving  Forward  
  55. 55. Ques(ons?   Handbook  email  –  handbookresearch@gmail.com       Rick  Ferdig  –  rferdig@gmail.com     Kathryn  Kennedy  –  kkennedy@mivu.org     Michael  K.  Barbour  –  mkbarbour@gmail.com     Leanna  Archambault  –  leanna.Archambault@asu.edu     Jered  Borup  –  jborup@gmu.edu   Mike  Menchaca  –  mikepm@hawaii.edu     Cathy  Cavanaugh  –  Cathy.Cavanaugh@microsor.com     Wendy  Drexler  –  wdrexler@iste.org     h]p://press.etc.cmu.edu/files/Handbook-­‐Blended-­‐ Learning_Ferdig-­‐Kennedy-­‐etal_web.pdf  

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