Successfully reported this slideshow.

CeLC 2010 - State of the Nation: K-12 Online Learning in Canada

0

Share

1 of 23
1 of 23

More Related Content

More from Michael Barbour

Related Books

Free with a 14 day trial from Scribd

See all

Related Audiobooks

Free with a 14 day trial from Scribd

See all

CeLC 2010 - State of the Nation: K-12 Online Learning in Canada

  1. 1. State of the Nation: K-12 Online Learning in Canada Michael K. Barbour, Wayne State University
  2. 2. Background • K-12 online learning began in British Columbia in 1993 with the creation of New Directions in Distance Learning and the EBUS Academy (Dallas, 1999) • Followed by district-based online programmes in Manitoba, Ontario, Alberta, and Newfoundland and Labrador (Barker & Wendel, 2001; Barker, Wendall & Richmond, 1999; Haughey & Fenwich, 1996; Stevens, 1997) • Wynne (1997) described few online learning programmes outside of British Columbia and Alberta and even less government regulation in this area • The Canadian Teachers Federation (2000) that there were approximately 25,000 K-12 students enroled in online courses during the 1999-2000 school year
  3. 3. Background • O’Haire, Froese-Germain and Lane-De Baie (2003) reported that Alberta had the most students engaged in online learning, but British Columbia also had a significant number of district-based and consortium programmes • Plante and Beattie (2004) found that almost 30% of schools – and almost 40% of secondary schools – in Canada were using the Internet for online learning • Haughey (2005) indicated that the growth of virtual schooling in Canada was slower than in the United States • The Canadian Council on Learning (2009) stated that “delivery of resources, however, does not guarantee learning, even when the initial barriers of access [to online learning] have been overcome” (p. 61)
  4. 4. iNACOL Report • State of the Nation Study: K-12 Online Learning in Canada – snapshot study in 2008 – http://www.inacol.org/resources/docs/NACOL_Canada Study-lr.pdf – complete study in 2009 - http://www.inacol.org/research/docs/iNACOL_Canada Study_200911.pdf – current study - 2010 • Virtual Schooling in Canada – project wiki site - http://virtualschool.wikispaces.com/ canada/
  5. 5. Methodology - 2009 Report • a survey that was sent to each of the Ministries of Education • follow-up interviews with Ministry officials • an analysis of documents from the Ministry of Education • eight of the thirteen responded • four of the provinces and territories ignored the request • e-Learning Ontario declined to participate these jurisdictions were based solely on the analysis of documents (and in some instances information provided by others involved in K-12 distance education in that province or territory, but not associated with the Ministry) • the Ministries of Education that responded were provided a draft copy of the profile for their revisions and • vignettes were solicited from suggestions made by the Ministry of Education contacts and existing relationships of the researcher
  6. 6. National Overview Single provincial online learning program Primarily district-based programs Combination of provincial online learning program and significant district-based Use district-based online learning programs from other provinces
  7. 7. Newfoundland and Labrador • Online learning began in mid-1990s • Single province-wide programme housed within MOE – Came from models developed in earlier district programmes • Initial focus on rural students • No specific policies for online learning, but work is currently being done in this area
  8. 8. Nova Scotia • Online learning began around 2003 • A provincial wide pilot programme house within the MOE & a couple of district-based programmes • Initial focus on specialized subject areas (e.g., French as a second language) • No specific policies for online learning, but there are 11 provisions included in the Nova Scotia Teachers Union agreement
  9. 9. Prince Edward Island • 8 courses offered to 11 French-language & 23 English-language students provided by New Brunswick • MOE has issued two directives since 2001 containing guidelines for the use of distance education in K-12 environment – MOE approves all DE offerings
  10. 10. New Brunswick • Online learning began around 1998 • Single province-wide programme housed within MOE – Grew from a single course to over 40 courses • Initial focus on technology, then all grade 11 and 12, & other optional & advanced courses – Used frequently by face-to-face teachers too • No legislative or regulation for online learning, but the Ministry has established a policy handbook that outlines the administrative procedures
  11. 11. Quebec • Networked Remote Schools or Écoles éloignées en réseau – Designed to connect rural and remote schools via the Internet to allow them to share curricular resources • Learn Quebec – English language, synchronous online learning programme • Province-wide programme for adult students – Société de formation à distance des commissions scolaires du Québec (SOFAD)  Three English & 37 French school boards manage their own programmes
  12. 12. Ontario • Online learning began around 1994 • Primarily district-based programmes using the provincial CMS and course content – Some private school activity • No legislative regulations – e-Learning Ontario has issued numerous memos regulating online learning • New teacher qualifications for Teaching and Learning through e-Learning
  13. 13. Manitoba • Province offers three forms of distance education – MOE manages correspondence and audio teleconference systems – Districts manage their own web-based programme using MOE content • All districts appear to participate in web-based option to some extent • Ministry’s distance learning policy is still in draft form & awaiting final approval
  14. 14. Saskatchewan • Ministry devolved their responsibility for distance education to school divisions – Provided additional transition funding in 2008-09 to assist school divisions • Fourteen school divisions created the Saskatchewan Distance Learning Course Repository to provide capacity to other divisions • No specific legislation or regulations that govern K-12 online learning
  15. 15. Alberta • Online learning began around 1994-95 • Numerous district-based, several private, and a province-wide programme • MOE has no specific online learning policies (simply advises school-based programmes to consider how they will treat online learning) – Had been in the process of creating a province- wide framework, but that process has stalled
  16. 16. British Columbia • First online learning programmes around 1993 • Substantial public and private (independent schools) activity • Only province where MOE has concrete separate, legislative policies for distance education
  17. 17. Yukon • Utilizes programmes from British Columbia • MOE active in this provincial-territorial agreement – With the Northern British Columbia Distance Education School (NBCDES) • Involved 141 students in 51 courses in 2006- 07 (<5000 students in territory) – up from 87 students in 49 courses the previous year
  18. 18. Northwest Territories • Utilizes programmes from Alberta • MOE active in this provincial-territorial agreement – With the Alberta Distance Learning Centre (ADLC) – Online Northern Studies 10 course offered during the second semester through Aurora College • Involved 179 students in 38 courses from 18 schools in 2007-08 (~10,000 K-12 students in territory)
  19. 19. Nunavut • No active K-12 distance education programmes – Piloted programmes in the past and had plans for further pilot projects – Past have utilizes programmes from Alberta • No specific reference to distance education in the legislation & no individual regulations
  20. 20. State of the Nation 2010 Study • Received additional funding – Update provincial profiles  Attempt to add level of activity – Continue with new vignettes – Add new brief issue papers section • Areas of Concern – French language programmes – Quebec – Northern Canada
  21. 21. Bibliography • Barker, K., & Wendel, T. (2001). e-Learning: Studying Canada's virtual secondary schools. Kelowna, BC: Society for the Advancement of Excellence in Education. Retrieved from http://web.archive.org/web/20040720185017/http://www.saee.ca/pdfs/006.pdf • Barker, K., Wendel, T., & Richmond, M. (1999). Linking the literature: School effectiveness and virtual schools. Vancouver, BC: FuturEd. Retrieved from http://web.archive.org/web/20061112102653/http://www.futured.com/pdf/Virtual.pdf • Canadian Teachers Federation. (2000). Facts sheets on contractual issues in distance/online education. Ottawa, ON: Author. • Canadian Council of Learning. (2009). State of e-learning in Canada. Ottawa, ON: Author. Retrieved from http://www.ccl-cca.ca/pdfs/E-learning/E-Learning_Report_FINAL-E.PDF • Dallas, J. (1999). Distance education for kindergarten to grade 12: A Canadian perspective. A presentation at the Pan- Commonwealth Forum, Brunei. Retrieved from http://www.col.org/forum/PCFpapers/PostWork/dallas.pdf • Haughey, M. (2005). Growth of online schooling in Canada. In C. Howard, J. Boettcher, L. Justice, K. Schenk, P. L. Rogers & G. A. Berg (Eds.), Encyclopedia of distance learning, (vol. 2, pp. 984-989). Hersey, PA: Idea Group, Inc. • Haughey, M., & Fenwick, T. (1996). Issues in forming school district consortia to provide distance education: Lessons from Alberta. Journal of Distance Education, 11(1). Retrieved from http://www.jofde.ca/index.php/jde/article/view/242/454 • O'Haire, N., Froese-Germain, B., & Lane-De Baie, S. (2003). Virtual education, real educators: Issues in online learning. Ottawa, ON: The Canadian Teachers' Federation. • Plante, J., & Beattie, D. (2004). Connectivity and ICT integration in Canadian elementary and secondary schools: First results from the information and communications technologies in schools survey, 2003-2004. Ottawa, ON: Statistics Canada. • Stevens, K. (1997a). The place of telelearning in the development of rural schools in Newfoundland and Labrador. Prospects, 4(4). Retrieved from http://www.cdli.ca/Community/Prospects/v4n4/telelearning.htm • Wynne, S. D. (1997). An overview of virtual schooling in North America and Europe. Victoria, BC: Open Learning Agency.
  22. 22. Your Questions and Comments
  23. 23. Assistant Professor Wayne State University, USA mkbarbour@gmail.com http://www.michaelbarbour.com

×