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CANeLearn Webinar 2015 - State of the Nation: K-12 Online Learning in Canada

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CANeLearn Webinar 2015 - State of the Nation: K-12 Online Learning in Canada

  1. 1. State  of  the  Na*on:  K-­‐12  Online   Learning  in  Canada   Michael  K.  Barbour   Sacred  Heart  University  
  2. 2. State of the Nation: K–12 Online Learning in Canada ® Written by Michael K. Barbour, Wayne State University
  3. 3. http://canelearn.net/state-of-the-nation-k-12-online-learning-in-canada/
  4. 4. Methodology   The image cannot be displayed. Your computer may not have enough memory to open the image, or the image may have been corrupted. Restart your computer, and then open the file again. If the red x still appears, you may have to delete the image and then insert it again.
  5. 5. Na-onal  Overview  -­‐  Ac-vity  
  6. 6. Na-onal  Overview  -­‐  Ac-vity   Province/Territory # of K-12 students # enroled in distance education Percent involvement NL 67,436 884 1.3% NS 122,643 ~2,720 2.2% PE 20,131 108 0.5% NB 101,079 2615 2.6% QC 1,307,026 ~70,5000 5.4% ON 2,015,411 78,095 3.9% MB 200,807 ~12,000 6.0% SK 172,205 ~10,000 1 5.8% AB 616,375 ~75,000 12.2% BC 635,057 77,912 12.3% YT 5,122 182 3.5% NT 8,204 228 2.8% NU 9,728 33 <0.1% Federal 106,500 ~1,800 0.1% Total 5,387,724 332,077 6.2% !
  7. 7. Na-onal  Overview  -­‐  Ac-vity  
  8. 8. Newfoundland  and  Labrador   •  Single  province-­‐wide  online  program  since   2001   – grew  out  of  district-­‐based  ini-a-ves  and  legacy   distance  educa-on  program     •  No  specific  policies  for  online  learning,  but   provincial  program  is  housed  within  MoE  
  9. 9. Nova  Sco-a   •  Recent  crea-on  of  a  single  province-­‐wide   program   – grew  out  of  district-­‐based  online  ini-a-ves     •  11  provisions  included  in  the  agreement   between  the  Government  &  teachers  union   – defining  the  work  day,  professional  development   requirements,  program  oversight,  class  size,  &   management  of  the  distance  program   •  Provincial  program  is  housed  within  MOE    
  10. 10. Prince  Edward  Island   •  Uses  online  learning  program  in  New   Brunswick   – phased  out  legacy  video  conferencing  program   several  years  ago     •  MOE  has  issued  two  direc-ves  since  2001   containing  guidelines  for  the  use  of  distance   educa-on  in  K-­‐12  environment  
  11. 11. New  Brunswick   •  Single  province-­‐wide  program  since  1998   (English  &  French)   – used  frequently  by  face-­‐to-­‐face  teachers  too   •  Ministry  has  created  a  100+  page  handbook   that  districts  have  to  agree  to  in  order  to   par-cipate  in  online  learning   •  Provincial  program  is  housed  within  MOE  
  12. 12. Quebec   •  Several  individual  online  and  correspondence   programs  that  partner  with  school  districts   – addi-onal  a  couple  of  programs  that  provide  for   connected  classrooms  or  blended  learning   •  MOE  devolved  distance  educa-on  to  the   districts  about  a  decade  ago   – currently  no  regula-on    
  13. 13. Ontario   •  Primarily  district-­‐based  program  using     the  provincial  CMS  and  course  content   – coopera-on  between  boards  through  consor-ums   – Growing  number  of  private  schools   – Independent  Learning  Centre     •  Ministry  has  created  contracts  that  districts   have  to  agree  to  in  order  to  par-cipate  in   online  learning  based  on  the  Provincial  E-­‐ Learning  Strategy    
  14. 14. Manitoba   •  Province  offers  three  forms   – MOE  manages  correspondence  &  instruc-onal   television  program   – districts  manage  their  own  web-­‐based  program   using  MOE  content   •  MOE  approves  programs  and  regulates  the   use  of  their  distance  content   v   virtual  collegiate  pilot  program  
  15. 15. Saskatchewan   •  Primarily  district-­‐based  programs   – most  have  their  own  capacity  in  some  form   – sixteen  districts  provided  space  to  external   students  through  the  Saskatchewan  Distance   Learning  Course  Repository   •  Province  devolved  responsibility  to    districts   –  no  regula-on  
  16. 16. Alberta   •  ~23  district-­‐based,  several  private,  &  province-­‐ wide  programs   •  MOE  has  no  specific  online  learning  policies   – reviewed  distributed  learning  around  2007-­‐09   – released  Inspiring  Ac7on  on  Educa7on  in  2011   – underwent  external  review  of  distance  educa-on   regula-on  &  ac-vity  around  2010-­‐12  
  17. 17. Bri-sh  Columbia   •  76  programs   – 60  public  district-­‐based   – 16  independent     •  Most  extensive  distributed  learning   regula-ons   – funding  follows  student   – quality  audit  process  
  18. 18. Yukon   •  Aurora  Virtual  School,  and  uses  programs   from  Bri-sh  Columbia  &  Alberta   –  Watson  Lake  Secondary  School  blended  learning  project       •  Primarily  regulated  by  Ministry  or  through   inter-­‐provincial  agreements    
  19. 19. Northwest  Territories   •  Pilot  being  conducted  involving  five  small   community  high  schools  across  three  regional   boards  of  educa-on   – u-lizes  programs  from  Alberta   •  Primarily  regulated  by  Ministry  or  through   inter-­‐provincial  agreements  
  20. 20. Nunavut   •  U-lizes  program  from  Alberta     •  Primarily  regulated  through  inter-­‐provincial   agreements   –  development  of  a  ministerial  direc-ve  regarding  access  to   and  delivery  of  distance  educa-on  has  been  underway   since  2012  
  21. 21. Federal  Programs   •  Sporadic  programs   –  two  in  Ontario  (Keeway-nook  Internet  High  School  and   Gai  hon  nya  ni:  the  Amos  Key  Jr.  E~Learning  Ins-tute),   one  in  Manitoba  Wapaskwa  Virtual  Collegiate),  and  one   in  Alberta  (SCcyber  E-­‐learning  Community)   –  Credenda  Virtual  High  School  (Saskatchewan)  ceased   opera-ons  following  the  2012-­‐13  school  year  due  to  a   lack  of  funding   •  No  longer  enter  into  service  agreements  directly   with  e-­‐learning  programs  
  22. 22. Trends  -­‐  Growth  
  23. 23. Trends  –  Beier  Data   Province/Territory # of K-12 students # enroled in distance education Percent involvement NL 67,436 884 1.3% NS 122,643 ~2,720 2.2% PE 20,131 108 0.5% NB 101,079 2615 2.6% QC 1,307,026 ~70,5000 5.4% ON 2,015,411 78,095 3.9% MB 200,807 ~12,000 6.0% SK 172,205 ~10,000 1 5.8% AB 616,375 ~75,000 12.2% BC 635,057 77,912 12.3% YT 5,122 182 3.5% NT 8,204 228 2.8% NU 9,728 33 <0.1% Federal 106,500 ~1,800 0.1% Total 5,387,724 332,077 6.2% !
  24. 24. Trends  –  Beier  Data   1.  The  Saskatchewan  Ministry  of  Educa-on   provided  the  figure  of  2,611  students.   However,  based  on  previous  edi-ons  of  this   study,  the  Ministry  figure  ojen  represents   between  30%-­‐35%  of  the  total.  
  25. 25. Trends  –  Beier  Data   •  26%  response  rate  in  2011   •  14%  response  rate  in  2012   •  21%  response  rate  in  2013    
  26. 26. Trends  –  Blended  Learning   •  more  than  a  third  of  the  enrollments  in  the  New   Brunswick  provincial  learning  management  system  are   from  classroom  teachers  and  students  using  the  content   in  a  blended  fashion   •  while  the  Learn  program  in  Quebec  serves  approximately   5,300  students  engaged  in  its  distance  educa-on   program,  it  has  more  than  150,000  enrollments  from   classroom  teachers  and  students  using  asynchronous   course  content   •  Bri-sh  Columbia’s  Navigate  Program  in  the  Courtenay/ Comox  school  district  received  iNACOL’s  2014  Innova-ve   Prac-ce  of  the  year  award  
  27. 27. Trends  –  Suppor-ve  Unions   •  NLTA  partnered  with  the  CDLI  to  create  a  Virtual  Teachers   Centre  to  use  the  infrastructure  and  exper-se  of  the  K-­‐12   online  learning  program  to  deliver  online  professional   development   •  several  teacher  unions  have  invested  in  research  into  how   teaching  at  a  distance  differs  from  teaching  in  the  classroom,   and  what  impact  that  has  on  the  workload  and  quality  of  life   of  their  members  who  teach  at  a  distance  (e.g.,  ATA  &  BCTF)   •  NSTU  has  11  provisions  related  to  distance  educa-on  in  its   contract  that  focus  on  teacher  cer-fica-on,  workload  issues,   defini-on  of  a  school  day  for  DE,  school-­‐based  supervision   and  administra-on  of  DE  students,  DE  class  size,  professional   development,  and  governance  of  DE  programs  
  28. 28. Trends  –  More  Research   •  beyond  a  small  number  of  descrip-ve  and/or   overview  pieces,  there  is  very  liile  research   •  BCTF  -­‐  an  effort  to  understand  what  K-­‐12   distance,  online  and  blended  learning  mean  for  its   members  and  the  nature  of  their  work  life   •  MUN  -­‐  two  federally  funded  ini-a-ves:   1.  the  Centre  for  TeleLearning  and  Rural  Educa-on     2.  the  Killick  Centre  for  E-­‐Learning  Research  
  29. 29. Your   Ques-ons   and   Comments  
  30. 30.  Director  of  Doctoral  Studies   Sacred  Heart  University,  USA   mkbarbour@gmail.com   hip://www.michaelbarbour.com    

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