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BlendED 2016 - State of the Nation: K-12 E-Learning in Canada

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BlendED 2016 - State of the Nation: K-12 E-Learning in Canada

  1. 1. State of the Na*on: K-12 E-Learning in Canada Michael K. Barbour Touro University, California
  2. 2. Methodology
  3. 3. State of the Nation: K–12 Online Learning in Canada ® Written by Michael K. Barbour, Wayne State University
  4. 4. http://k12sotn.ca
  5. 5. Na-onal Overview - Ac-vity
  6. 6. Na-onal Overview - Ac-vity
  7. 7. Na-onal Overview - Ac-vity
  8. 8. Newfoundland and Labrador •  Single province-wide online program housed within the Ministry •  No language in the Educa&on Act, as well no policies or regula-ons specifically related to K-12 distance educa-on •  Ministry does track the method of delivery that students complete their courses through the K-12 School Profile System
  9. 9. Newfoundland and Labrador •  947 students registered and 1718 course registra-ons in 38 different courses represen-ng 115 different schools – ~7% increase •  Asynchronous course content, as well as tutorial materials, available to all students and teachers – Do not track blended usage
  10. 10. Nova Sco-a •  Province-wide programs housed within the Ministry •  11 provisions included in the collec-ve agreement between the Government of Nova Sco-a and the Nova Sco-a Teachers Union
  11. 11. Nova Sco-a •  Correspondence and online programs – 15% decrease from previous school year •  Some tracking of blended learning – Google Apps for Educa&on: 54,000 ac-ve accounts – blended learning plaVorm: 27,500 ac-ve users
  12. 12. Prince Edward Island •  Ministerial Direc-ves No. MD 2008–05 – applies to courses delivered during the regular school day – broadly defines distance educa-on and outlines a series of beliefs about the nature of distance educa-on instruc-on
  13. 13. Prince Edward Island •  No distance programs – u-lizes program in NB – 50% decrease in level of par-cipa-on •  Does not track blended learning
  14. 14. New Brunswick •  Policy handbook - different for both the English and French systems – Outlines responsibili-es of a variety of individuals at the Ministry, district and school level to ensure the orderly implementa-on of the distance educa-on program – Also includes school officials such as a registrar and local site facilitator, there are specific responsibili-es outlined for both distance educa-on students and the parents of students who are enrolled in distance educa-on programs
  15. 15. New Brunswick •  Slight increase in the number of students learning at a distance – Less than 5% growth •  Tracks the number of students using the provincial system for blended learning – Small increase in Anglophone system – Significant increase in Francophone system (1511 to 4258 students)
  16. 16. Quebec •  Educa&on Act makes no reference to distance educa-on •  Since 1995 school boards have held the primary responsibility for distance educa-on policies and regula-ons
  17. 17. Quebec •  Société de forma-on à distance des commissions scolaires du Québec (SOFAD) –  29,386 adult students •  Leading English Educa-on and Resource Network (LEARN) –  distance learning to ~8,500 English-language –  close to 36,500 students for blended learning •  Écoles en réseau (ÉER) –  5000 students through use of Knowledge Forum and various synchronous tools •  Beauce-Etchemin School Board –  Offered remedial and full--me online courses
  18. 18. Ontario •  Ministry provides: – Learning management system – Course content – Student informa-on system •  To use school board’s must agree to provisions in the Provincial E-Learning Strategy: Master User Agreement
  19. 19. Ontario •  Tracks online enrollments in provincial LMS – Enrollment in LMS might not mean course enrollment – Steady increase year to year (~52,000-~54,000 plus ~20,000 ILC and ~7,000 private school students) •  Tracks blended learning enrollments in provincial LMS – Significant involvement (237,930 unique logins)
  20. 20. Manitoba •  Public Schools Act says Minister of Educa-on can approve courses of study, including correspondence and other courses •  Manitoba Educa-on and Advanced Learning has issued handbooks for each of the three distance learning op-ons •  Ministry pilo-ng virtual collegiates
  21. 21. Manitoba •  2,577 enrollments in the Independent Study Op-on •  389 enrollments in Teacher Mediate Op-on •  6,500 enrollments in the Web-Based Course Op-on – Overall decrease in level of par-cipa-on •  Does not track blended learning
  22. 22. Saskatchewan •  In 2009 the Ministry devolved the responsibility for distance educa-on to the school divisions – No specific policies or regula-on •  Saskatchewan Distance Learning Course Repository
  23. 23. Saskatchewan •  Ministry reports 3,405 unique students enrolled in distance learning •  Based on responses from 5 of the 21 programs to the Individual Program Survey there appeared to be at least 5,665 students •  Researchers es-mated there to be about 15,000 students engaged in K-12 distance educa-on
  24. 24. Alberta •  No specific policies •  Mul-ple ini-a-ves to establish policy – Beginning in 2007 there were consulta-ons around a distributed learning framework – Consulta-ons on the 2011 Inspiring Ac&on in Educa&on ini-a-ve – Two-year review of distance educa-on programs and services offered in the province by an external consul-ng firm
  25. 25. Alberta •  Es-mate there to be ~20 distance learning programs serving ~70,000 students – e.g., ADLC served ~40,000 students •  No guesses on blended learning ac-vity
  26. 26. Bri-sh Columbia •  Legisla-ve language – sec-on 3.1 and sec-on 75 (4.1) of the School Act, 2006 – sec-on 8.1 of the Independent School Act, 2006 •  Key features include: – Funding model – Financial audits – Professional development quality reviews
  27. 27. Bri-sh Columbia •  60 public distributed learning schools •  16 independent (or private) distributed learning schools – enrolled approximately 78,500 unique students in one or more courses •  No tracking of blended learning ac-vity
  28. 28. Yukon •  Educa&on Act, 2002 allows Minister to provide distance educa-on courses and charge fees for students to access those courses – Since 2003 distributed learning courses at no cost to students up to the age of 21 •  Individual Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) that it signs with each individual distance learning programs
  29. 29. Yukon •  Aurora Virtual School: 58 students enrolled •  BC DL schools: 48 grade 8-12 students and 65 K-7 students •  ~250 students enrolled in online courses offered by their own schools •  379 students enrolled in blended learning op-ons
  30. 30. Northwest Territories •  Educa&on Act, 2009 allows various educa-onal bodies to “authorize, supervise and evaluate the use of distance learning programs in the provision of the educa-on program” •  Individual Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) that it signs with each individual distance learning programs
  31. 31. Northwest Territories •  distance learning pilot with five small community high schools located across three regional boards of educa-on – ~40 students •  112 students were enrolled in Alberta Distance Learning Centre •  Does not formally track blended learning
  32. 32. Nunavut •  Educa&on Act, 1999 allows various educa-onal bodies to “authorize, supervise and evaluate the use of distance learning programs in the provision of the educa-on program” •  Individual Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) that it signs with each individual distance learning programs
  33. 33. Nunavut •  No internal programs or pilots •  Uses Alberta Distance Learning Centre –  96 students enrolled in 186 different courses •  Does not formally track blended learning
  34. 34. Federal Programs •  No specific policies or regula-ons beyond provincial policies and regula-ons •  Beginning in 2014-15, no longer enter into service agreements directly with e-learning programs
  35. 35. Federal Programs •  Does not track distance or blended learning •  Mul-ple programs –  two in Ontario –  one in Manitoba –  one in Alberta •  Consistent level of par-cipa-on –  ~2,000 students
  36. 36. General Trends
  37. 37. Trends – Beoer Data
  38. 38. Trends – Beoer Data •  26% response rate in 2011 •  14% response rate in 2012 •  21% response rate in 2013
  39. 39. Trends – More Research •  beyond a small number of descrip-ve and/or overview pieces, there is very liole research •  BCTF - an effort to understand what K-12 distance, online and blended learning mean for its members and the nature of their work life •  MUN - two federally funded ini-a-ves: 1.  the Centre for TeleLearning and Rural Educa-on 2.  the Killick Centre for E-Learning Research
  40. 40. Trends – Suppor-ve Unions •  NLTA partnered with the CDLI to create a Virtual Teachers Centre to use the infrastructure and exper-se of the K-12 online learning program to deliver online professional development •  several teacher unions have invested in research into how teaching at a distance differs from teaching in the classroom, and what impact that has on the workload and quality of life of their members who teach at a distance (e.g., ATA & BCTF) •  NSTU has 11 provisions related to distance educa-on in its contract that focus on teacher cer-fica-on, workload issues, defini-on of a school day for DE, school-based supervision and administra-on of DE students, DE class size, professional development, and governance of DE programs
  41. 41. http://k12sotn.ca
  42. 42. Your Ques-ons and Comments
  43. 43. Associate Professor of Instruc-onal Design Touro University, California mkbarbour@gmail.com hop://www.michaelbarbour.com

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