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Lean In Networking
Women in Networking
We tend to
• speak up less
• advocate for ourselves less
• get caught up in being perfect
• helping ot...
Why?
An entire set of learned behaviors and social
pressure.
In here, we are going to figure out how to
conquer those issu...
What Does That Mean?
Lean In Networking is about
Participating Strategically
Participating: Learning how to network,
going...
Jasmine & the Coffee Shop
Agenda
• Intro & Disclaimers
• What is Networking
• How to Network
• Personal Brand
• Customizing Your Networking
– Immuta...
Ecosystem
Networking is an interaction, a relationship between you
and other people.
But networking begins before that mee...
Disclaimer #1:
Not a Political Conversation
(I will repeat these when we move into this part of the
conversation and go in...
Disclaimer #2:
Not all options are for everyone
When I present a tool or option, I am
NEVER saying that you should change....
Disclaimer #3:
Everyone has prejudices
When we discuss prejudices and issues, this
includes women.
Not all men are unhelpf...
Disclaimer #4:
None of this is personal
None of the examples here are real – and
none of this is personal.
All examples de...
About Me
• Avid Networker
• Started a Mentoring Program
• Founder, Web Content Mavens
• Digital Strategy Consultant
Strategic Changes
Business Development
is to
Networking
--- AS ---
Sales
is to
Asking for a Job
BD -> Networking
BD, Sales, Marketing
Business Development
• Understand the product
• Know how to communicate the value
• Identify the markets and potential
cus...
Network Development
• Understand yourself
• Know how to communicate your value
• Identify networking opportunities that
re...
Why Network?
Value of Networking
• 60% of jobs are found through networking –
some estimate higher
• 70-80% of positions aren‟t even ad...
Relationships Generate Business
• When people know you and have a
relationship with you, they are more likely
to:
– Advoca...
What Is Networking
What is Networking?
Network: a “group, system, etc of
interconnected or cooperating individuals”
Networking is about...
–Creating relationships
–Establishing 2-way communication
–Building trust networks
–Defining & supp...
Networking is NOT about...
–Using others to advance
yourself
–Short term job seeking or short
term benefit seeking (see Sa...
Networking Best
Practices
10 Golden Rules of
Networking
Ten essential items to keep in mind when
planning for an event and when out
networking.
1. B...
10 Golden Rules of
Networking
4. Be clear and concise about what you are
looking to gain from the interaction.
5. Be hones...
10 Golden Rules of
Networking
8. Be interested in the other person.
9. Don‟t worry if you‟ve forgotten a name.
Just be hon...
(A Note on Job Seeking)
If you are looking for a job or other
assistance –do so in a brief clear manner.
Be careful not to...
We Are Looking for
Balance
– Be Open / Don't Overshare
– Vulnerable / Not Needy
– Interested / Not Watchful
– Modest / Not...
Where To Network
Where to Network
WHERE TO START BUILDING YOU NETWORK
Family and friends – even if they don‟t work in the same field or
ver...
Where to Network (cont)
Previous employers – easy to do now with linked-in, etc
Clients/contacts/donors
Alumni groups
Onli...
Plan for the Future!
When you meet someone,
evaluate them based not just
on your current needs
Instead, on where you and
t...
How To Network
Qualities of a Great Networker
This is just a free-form list. Not everyone is good at every item. You should add to this a...
At Events
• Events can be tremendously hard even for
the un-shy among us. Some basic
principles for navigating events.
• G...
Dos & Don’ts
• Don’t sit down
• Don’t fiddle with your iPhone
• Do stand near the bar, buffet, entrance or other
gathering...
Your Situation
SITUATIONS
• Active job seeker
• Passive job seeker
• Represent company
• Start company
Your Goals
GOALS
• You = job, next career move, networking,
professional dev, resources for work
• Company = Biz Dev, expo...
Introductory Statement
• Name
• Why here
– Lead with primary goal
– Job/netw - I do this for this co
– Company - I work fo...
Mechanics of Networking
Nametags
• First Name = big letters
• What you want to promote:
– the company you work for
• If you have a more common nam...
HOW TO NETWOEK
• Mechanics
– Who to approach
– How to Escape
– Break into a conversation group
– Work a room
– When to off...
Starting a Conversation
• Hi, my name is Jasmine
• What brought you here?
• Are you an x or a y attendee?
• Do you know ma...
More...
• That‟s a great tie. Love that shirt.
– When someone compliments you – use it as
an opportunity to talk more.
• H...
More...
• Both here at the buffet/bar, mind if I
introduce myself?
• I'd love to meet new people - can you be
one?
• Netwo...
Next Phase
• Often not necessary – the first sentence is
usually enough.
• What are you working on? What are you
intereste...
Non-Professional Events
(or later at professional ones)
• Ask an intriguing question
• Great event. I know I should go hom...
Dos & Don’ts
• Stop worrying about etiquette
• Talk to new people
• It's ok to start with a friend/acquaintance
in the fir...
Closing the Conversation
• Clear, concise call to action if you want to
follow-up
– I'd love to talk more, grab coffee, pi...
Ending a Conversation
• “I‟m headed over there. Nice to meet”.
• “Excuse me. I have to take this text
message”.
• “I‟m sor...
Following Up
• Twitter, facebook, linkedin, etc
• How to follow-up after no reply
• How to keep the conversation going
(ty...
Stay In Contact
A few ideas...
• Jot down notes about people.
• Follow-up to see if a deal went through, if they
found a n...
Brand You
The Value Proposition
The Value Proposition answers the question:
Why should this person want to talk to you?
Identify you...
Personal Branding Statement
1. Who you are (your skills & specialty)
2. What you do (your industry/service)
3. Who you wor...
Brand = Memory Helper
Branding = signals that generate
associations.
Brand You
Your Personal Brand is roughly how you want to be
perceived – so a mix of a few qualities including:
1. Your per...
What’s the Buzz On YOU?
If there isn't buzz, then how do you create
that?
• Positive
• Accurate & Authentic
• Clear
• Rele...
Positive
• This is the best version of you.
• It needs to be accurate but also highlight
the strongest parts of you.
Accurate & Authentic
• You need to promise something accurate
& authentic.
• You do not need to share every flaw
• You DO ...
Relevant
• Make sure your brand aligns with a need.
EXERCISE
Memorable
• People need a way to differentiate between
brands - a way to remember you and what
you do or offer
• If there ...
About You
Disclaimer #1:
Not a Political Conversation
(I will repeat these when we move into this part of the
conversation and go in...
Disclaimer #2:
Everyone has prejudices
When we discuss prejudices and issues, this
includes women.
Not all men are unhelpf...
Disclaimer #3:
None of this is personal
None of the examples here are real – and
none of this is personal.
All examples de...
Disclaimer #4: You do not need to
change.
When I present a customization, tool or
option, I am NEVER saying that you
shoul...
Disclaimer #4
More Detail
Customizing
2 women: Olga & Nina. Both are: 5‟, baby faced,
wear dresses & flats, interested in ...
Immutable You
• Elements of your personal self that can be relevant in networking.
Even if that‟s not ok.
• Sex
• Height
•...
Being Judged
It happens.
Mutable You
Somewhat Changeable
• Voice & Accent
• Personal Style
Highly Changeable
Personal Presence
• External
• Clothin...
Personal Style
When to Dress Up
Internal You
This is where we talk more about women in
networking.
These are the habits, learned behaviors and
self-
Shyness & Introversion
Imposter Syndrome
For women, feeling like a fraud is a
symptom of a greater problem. We
consistently underestimate ourselv...
Confidence
For women, feeling like a fraud is a
symptom of a greater problem. We
consistently underestimate ourselves.
Mul...
Raising Your
Hand
Or just shout
it out!
Give Yourself Credit
“Ask a man to explain his success and he will
typically credit his own innate qualities and
skills. A...
Nurturing
• “Our entrenched cultural ideas associate men
with leadership qualities and women with
nurturing qualities and ...
Being an Authority
Speaking Up
“From a very early age, boys are encouraged to
take charge and offer their opinions.
Teachers interact more wi...
Sex
Ambition
• Work, money and success are listed first
as a value for men.
• Not for women.
It’s about RESULTS
Networking is not about friends. It‟s about
results.
- Focus on it.
- Put energy into it.
- Expect resu...
Men & Women in Networking
• "The problem is that women speak to men to
relate and men speak to women to impress,"
Walker s...
Ecosystem
Pieces of the Ecosystem
• The networking environment: the type of
event, ratios of men to women, ways of
dress, alcohol, e...
Architect
DO IT!
Preparation -> Action -> Followup -> Next
Steps
Where You Network
• Now - what are the not ideal situations
– people don't want to talk to you (not the
perception)
– ever...
Environment
• The situation you find yourself in
• Closed group
• Out of place: age difference, clothing
(casual/stained/e...
Lean In Networking: Steps
• Know your personal brand
• Learn the mechanics of networking
• Understand your challenges and ...
Questions?
Jasmine Sante
Sante Strategies
mjsante@santestrategies.com
@mjsante
Lean in Networking
Lean in Networking
Lean in Networking
Lean in Networking
Lean in Networking
Lean in Networking
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Lean in Networking

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One of the significant challenges women face in networking is how to effectively “lean in” to the opportunity. In ‘Lean In’ Networking, you’ll learn mechanics of networking and how to define a successful personal brand. You will also learn about the networking ecosystem, the three core pieces of successful networking and tips for addressing your personal networking challenges. And how to tie it all together, go out there and “lean in.”

Published in: Leadership & Management
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Lean in Networking

  1. 1. Lean In Networking
  2. 2. Women in Networking We tend to • speak up less • advocate for ourselves less • get caught up in being perfect • helping others to our own detriment • be less ambitious (and therefore less strategic) than men
  3. 3. Why? An entire set of learned behaviors and social pressure. In here, we are going to figure out how to conquer those issues.
  4. 4. What Does That Mean? Lean In Networking is about Participating Strategically Participating: Learning how to network, going to events and talking to people at events. Strategically: Communicating your value - with a strategy in mind.
  5. 5. Jasmine & the Coffee Shop
  6. 6. Agenda • Intro & Disclaimers • What is Networking • How to Network • Personal Brand • Customizing Your Networking – Immutable Identity (sex, race, height, etc) – Mutable Elements (personality, style, speaking etc) – Self-understanding (biases, insecurities, self-value) • Networking Strategically • Ecosystem of Networking – (tying it all together) – Environment – People – You
  7. 7. Ecosystem Networking is an interaction, a relationship between you and other people. But networking begins before that meeting. – It begins with you knowing yourself - your skills your abilities and your challenges – And ends with you presenting an honest, accurate & compelling person at an event – With a lot in between including • finding the right event • talking to the right people • presenting the right external package • communicating successfully • being memorable – And can continue with email and follow-up
  8. 8. Disclaimer #1: Not a Political Conversation (I will repeat these when we move into this part of the conversation and go into more detail.) Not a political conversation • Gender, sex, discrimination will come up. • This is a practical class – not an aspirational one. • Focused on how the world is, not how it ought to be. • We want a better world but that‟s not what we get every day. • By making changes ourselves, we can make things better. NOTE: That doesn‟t mean you should tolerate or accept bad behavior. These are tools – you use them based on your particular circumstances.
  9. 9. Disclaimer #2: Not all options are for everyone When I present a tool or option, I am NEVER saying that you should change. I am saying knowledge is useful. Tools are helpful and you can choose how to respond.
  10. 10. Disclaimer #3: Everyone has prejudices When we discuss prejudices and issues, this includes women. Not all men are unhelpful & backwards. Not all women are your friends. (we are often hardest on other women so self awareness is important too)
  11. 11. Disclaimer #4: None of this is personal None of the examples here are real – and none of this is personal. All examples decided before I came in today.
  12. 12. About Me • Avid Networker • Started a Mentoring Program • Founder, Web Content Mavens • Digital Strategy Consultant
  13. 13. Strategic Changes
  14. 14. Business Development is to Networking --- AS --- Sales is to Asking for a Job BD -> Networking
  15. 15. BD, Sales, Marketing
  16. 16. Business Development • Understand the product • Know how to communicate the value • Identify the markets and potential customers for your product • Build long term relationships within those markets • Follow-up to continue the relationship Leading to a pipeline of business
  17. 17. Network Development • Understand yourself • Know how to communicate your value • Identify networking opportunities that reach your target audience • Build relationships at the event • Follow-up to continue the relationship Leading to a pipeline of connections
  18. 18. Why Network?
  19. 19. Value of Networking • 60% of jobs are found through networking – some estimate higher • 70-80% of positions aren‟t even advertised • Examples include getting your roof fixed (aren‟t you more likely to pick a neighbor who has a clean yard and a sign out than a stranger) to this very class (now that we‟ve all met, we'll be more likely to help each other).
  20. 20. Relationships Generate Business • When people know you and have a relationship with you, they are more likely to: – Advocate for you – Remember you when an opportunity opens up – Help you with issues and challenges – Give you a better deal than a stranger
  21. 21. What Is Networking
  22. 22. What is Networking? Network: a “group, system, etc of interconnected or cooperating individuals”
  23. 23. Networking is about... –Creating relationships –Establishing 2-way communication –Building trust networks –Defining & supporting mutual benefit –Achieving momentum
  24. 24. Networking is NOT about... –Using others to advance yourself –Short term job seeking or short term benefit seeking (see Sales) –Taking from people without giving benefit –It‟s not short term
  25. 25. Networking Best Practices
  26. 26. 10 Golden Rules of Networking Ten essential items to keep in mind when planning for an event and when out networking. 1. Be open to others 2. Be kind and positive – not just because it‟s good, but because it serves you better 3. Be aware of your time and others (guiding rule: 8-10 min per conversation, unless in a group)
  27. 27. 10 Golden Rules of Networking 4. Be clear and concise about what you are looking to gain from the interaction. 5. Be honest but don‟t overshare. 6. Be aware of your clothing and posture – you want to present the best possible “you”. 7. After talking, ask for contact information if you want to follow-up. Don‟t wait for the other person.
  28. 28. 10 Golden Rules of Networking 8. Be interested in the other person. 9. Don‟t worry if you‟ve forgotten a name. Just be honest and say “I‟m afraid your name is escaping me at the moment” 10.Use honest and direct language. Best opening line: “Hi, my name is…”
  29. 29. (A Note on Job Seeking) If you are looking for a job or other assistance –do so in a brief clear manner. Be careful not to give the impression you are looking for a job from the other person (If they don‟t have a job for you, this will often end the conversation – even if they may have contacts worth pursuing.)
  30. 30. We Are Looking for Balance – Be Open / Don't Overshare – Vulnerable / Not Needy – Interested / Not Watchful – Modest / Not Self Depriciating – Kind / Not Walked-Over (need new term)
  31. 31. Where To Network
  32. 32. Where to Network WHERE TO START BUILDING YOU NETWORK Family and friends – even if they don‟t work in the same field or vertical, they may have contacts you hadn‟t considered – and they can give you the best possible recommendation. In your office/location/school – Get to know your co-workers – Chat with others in your location (ask questions about what they do, about the business they work for, etc) Business associates
  33. 33. Where to Network (cont) Previous employers – easy to do now with linked-in, etc Clients/contacts/donors Alumni groups Online – twitter, facebook, blogs, etc Create Your Own Networking Events
  34. 34. Plan for the Future! When you meet someone, evaluate them based not just on your current needs Instead, on where you and they might be in a few years.
  35. 35. How To Network
  36. 36. Qualities of a Great Networker This is just a free-form list. Not everyone is good at every item. You should add to this as you learn about networking – and find which items you have to struggle to achieve and which items come easily to you. • Friendly • Smiles easily • Listens well – and is able to offer opinions and ideas • Is interested in others • Expects others to be interested in him/her • Is able to succinctly state what he/she is looking for in 30-45 seconds • Helpful to others – makes introductions, holds a bag, etc • Prepares for the event • Arrives early • Introduces his/herself to others • Aware of time – both for themselves and for others • Takes notes on the people they‟ve met • Asks for business cards • Quick follow-up after an event or interaction • Avoids jargon/doesn‟t make the other person feel less intelligent
  37. 37. At Events • Events can be tremendously hard even for the un-shy among us. Some basic principles for navigating events. • Generally, be open to people (to the largest degree you can) • Open body posture • Look around, not down • Smile when someone meets your eyes
  38. 38. Dos & Don’ts • Don’t sit down • Don’t fiddle with your iPhone • Do stand near the bar, buffet, entrance or other gathering place • Do have a drink in hand to avoid crossing your arms • Don’t stand with a closed posture or look down • Do look around the room – slowly and calmly (you aren‟t looking for someone – you are viewing the crowd) • Do meet people‟s eyes – and if they are close, smile and introduce yourself
  39. 39. Your Situation SITUATIONS • Active job seeker • Passive job seeker • Represent company • Start company
  40. 40. Your Goals GOALS • You = job, next career move, networking, professional dev, resources for work • Company = Biz Dev, exposure etc • Idea = entrepreneur
  41. 41. Introductory Statement • Name • Why here – Lead with primary goal – Job/netw - I do this for this co – Company - I work for – Startup - Starting a firm that does x
  42. 42. Mechanics of Networking
  43. 43. Nametags • First Name = big letters • What you want to promote: – the company you work for • If you have a more common name: Add an last initial (or last name if short)
  44. 44. HOW TO NETWOEK • Mechanics – Who to approach – How to Escape – Break into a conversation group – Work a room – When to offer a biz card
  45. 45. Starting a Conversation • Hi, my name is Jasmine • What brought you here? • Are you an x or a y attendee? • Do you know many people here? I'm trying to meet x or y. Or to meet people who do x or y. • Do you mind if I join you? • How did you hear about this event? • There‟s a lot of x. What jumps out at you? (or what doesn't work for you, etc) • Are you following x story?
  46. 46. More... • That‟s a great tie. Love that shirt. – When someone compliments you – use it as an opportunity to talk more. • Have you tried the food yet? I‟m torn between the beef and the veggie. • I‟m trying to extend my network – not just talk with the usual suspects. • Is that a Note? I‟ve been looking at those.
  47. 47. More... • Both here at the buffet/bar, mind if I introduce myself? • I'd love to meet new people - can you be one? • Networking - we have to do it but its not easy for me
  48. 48. Next Phase • Often not necessary – the first sentence is usually enough. • What are you working on? What are you interested in? • Talk about a friends project • Talk up technology • Talk about yourself!
  49. 49. Non-Professional Events (or later at professional ones) • Ask an intriguing question • Great event. I know I should go home but I‟m enjoying this so much. • Are you having fun? • I‟m thinking of grabbing dinner after this – do you know the area?
  50. 50. Dos & Don’ts • Stop worrying about etiquette • Talk to new people • It's ok to start with a friend/acquaintance in the first few minutes or when you feel uncomfortable • Visit with them when they are talking with someone
  51. 51. Closing the Conversation • Clear, concise call to action if you want to follow-up – I'd love to talk more, grab coffee, pick brain, etc
  52. 52. Ending a Conversation • “I‟m headed over there. Nice to meet”. • “Excuse me. I have to take this text message”. • “I‟m sorry but I need to take care of something”. <-or talk to someone • “This is a great conversation. Can we continue this later?” • “This has been great. I‟d like to meet a few other people but let‟s talk later.” <-optional
  53. 53. Following Up • Twitter, facebook, linkedin, etc • How to follow-up after no reply • How to keep the conversation going (types: casual keeping self on radar, when you want something, etc)
  54. 54. Stay In Contact A few ideas... • Jot down notes about people. • Follow-up to see if a deal went through, if they found a new apartment, etc. • Send interesting articles with a short note (“Thought this might be of interest”) • Forward events that might be useful to them (Note that frequency will depend on the relationship - but once a month is usually the max unless you are close with someone.)
  55. 55. Brand You
  56. 56. The Value Proposition The Value Proposition answers the question: Why should this person want to talk to you? Identify your personal brand - the accurate, concise, clear and compelling statement of who you are that will engage others and create relationships and opportunities - and learn how to communicate your brand efficiently and effectively.
  57. 57. Personal Branding Statement 1. Who you are (your skills & specialty) 2. What you do (your industry/service) 3. Who you work with 4. A leading attribute
  58. 58. Brand = Memory Helper Branding = signals that generate associations.
  59. 59. Brand You Your Personal Brand is roughly how you want to be perceived – so a mix of a few qualities including: 1. Your personality 2. Your personal values and interests 3. Your trustworthiness and consistency 4. Your value to others – your benefits and talents You communicate items 1-3 by your actions, by how you speak and communicate, how you follow-through and interact. It is the last item (#4) that you need to verbally communicate. Don‟t make people work to see the talents you bring to the table.
  60. 60. What’s the Buzz On YOU? If there isn't buzz, then how do you create that? • Positive • Accurate & Authentic • Clear • Relevant • Memorable
  61. 61. Positive • This is the best version of you. • It needs to be accurate but also highlight the strongest parts of you.
  62. 62. Accurate & Authentic • You need to promise something accurate & authentic. • You do not need to share every flaw • You DO need to be authentic
  63. 63. Relevant • Make sure your brand aligns with a need. EXERCISE
  64. 64. Memorable • People need a way to differentiate between brands - a way to remember you and what you do or offer • If there are already lots of XYZs, don't focus on that. If you do something very esoteric, find a way to package it that is still unique but not so specialized. • IE if you do user research for startups, talk first about user experience and startups.
  65. 65. About You
  66. 66. Disclaimer #1: Not a Political Conversation (I will repeat these when we move into this part of the conversation and go into more detail.) Not a political conversation • Gender, sex, discrimination will come up. • This is a practical class – not an aspirational one. • Focused on how the world is, not how it ought to be. • We want a better world but that‟s not what we get every day. • By making changes ourselves, we can make things better. NOTE: That doesn‟t mean you should tolerate or accept bad behavior. These are tools – you use them based on your particular circumstances.
  67. 67. Disclaimer #2: Everyone has prejudices When we discuss prejudices and issues, this includes women. Not all men are unhelpful & backwards. Not all women are your friends. (we are often hardest on other women so self awareness is important too)
  68. 68. Disclaimer #3: None of this is personal None of the examples here are real – and none of this is personal. All examples decided before I came in today.
  69. 69. Disclaimer #4: You do not need to change. When I present a customization, tool or option, I am NEVER saying that you should change. I am saying knowledge is useful. Tools are helpful and you can choose how to respond.
  70. 70. Disclaimer #4 More Detail Customizing 2 women: Olga & Nina. Both are: 5‟, baby faced, wear dresses & flats, interested in marketing jobs. Olga Social Loud voice Brunette Bright colors Nina Introvert Quiet voice Blonde Pastels
  71. 71. Immutable You • Elements of your personal self that can be relevant in networking. Even if that‟s not ok. • Sex • Height • Weight/Build • Attractiveness • Age • Accent (usually) • Race & Ethnicity
  72. 72. Being Judged It happens.
  73. 73. Mutable You Somewhat Changeable • Voice & Accent • Personal Style Highly Changeable Personal Presence • External • Clothing • Shoes
  74. 74. Personal Style
  75. 75. When to Dress Up
  76. 76. Internal You This is where we talk more about women in networking. These are the habits, learned behaviors and self-
  77. 77. Shyness & Introversion
  78. 78. Imposter Syndrome For women, feeling like a fraud is a symptom of a greater problem. We consistently underestimate ourselves. Multiple studies in multiple industries show that women often judge their own performance as worse than it is, while men judge their performance as better than it actually is.” – Lean In, p 29
  79. 79. Confidence For women, feeling like a fraud is a symptom of a greater problem. We consistently underestimate ourselves. Multiple studies in multiple industries show that women often judge their own performance as worse than it is, while men judge their performance as better than it actually is.” – Lean In, p 29
  80. 80. Raising Your Hand Or just shout it out!
  81. 81. Give Yourself Credit “Ask a man to explain his success and he will typically credit his own innate qualities and skills. Ask a woman the same question and she will attribute her success to external factors, insisting she did well because she „worked really hard,‟ or „got lucky,‟ or „had help from others.‟” Similarly, when a man fails, he points to factors such as his lack of time studying or lack of interest in the subject. When a woman fails, she‟s more likely to say it was due to her lack of ability.
  82. 82. Nurturing • “Our entrenched cultural ideas associate men with leadership qualities and women with nurturing qualities and put women in a double bind,” [Deborah Gruenfeld] said. “We believe not only that women are nurturing but that they should be nurturing above all else. When a woman does anything that signals she might not be nice first and foremost, it creates a negative impression and makes us uncomfortable.”
  83. 83. Being an Authority
  84. 84. Speaking Up “From a very early age, boys are encouraged to take charge and offer their opinions. Teachers interact more with boys, call on them more frequently, and ask them more questions. Boys are also more likely to call out answers, and when they do, teachers usually listen to them. When girls call out, teachers often scold them for breaking the rules and remind them to raise their hands if they want to speak. – Lean In, p 20
  85. 85. Sex
  86. 86. Ambition • Work, money and success are listed first as a value for men. • Not for women.
  87. 87. It’s about RESULTS Networking is not about friends. It‟s about results. - Focus on it. - Put energy into it. - Expect results.
  88. 88. Men & Women in Networking • "The problem is that women speak to men to relate and men speak to women to impress," Walker said. "Because women speak to relate, men think they're not serious about their business, they always get personal. They're just as serious as the guys are; they just do it differently." - Hazel Walker, author, Business Networking and Sex • As a sales trainer, I‟ve noticed that men ask for the sale much more readily than do women, who need additional coaching in this area. I‟ve witnessed this phenomenon for years. • (response from the survey)
  89. 89. Ecosystem
  90. 90. Pieces of the Ecosystem • The networking environment: the type of event, ratios of men to women, ways of dress, alcohol, etc. • The people you interact with and understanding their motivations, unspoken views and opinions. • And how to mix networking best practices with your personal brand and networking challenges.
  91. 91. Architect DO IT! Preparation -> Action -> Followup -> Next Steps
  92. 92. Where You Network • Now - what are the not ideal situations – people don't want to talk to you (not the perception) – everyone is way dressier/fancier – not your field
  93. 93. Environment • The situation you find yourself in • Closed group • Out of place: age difference, clothing (casual/stained/etc) • Social vs networking event
  94. 94. Lean In Networking: Steps • Know your personal brand • Learn the mechanics of networking • Understand your challenges and strengths • Perceive the needs and views of those around you • Want to Lean In = Lean In Networking
  95. 95. Questions? Jasmine Sante Sante Strategies mjsante@santestrategies.com @mjsante

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