ACE Overview for US State Department

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Delivered on October 3, 2011

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  • The overwhelming majority of climate scientists agreeClimate change isRealHuman-causedHappening 10x faster than naturallyImpacts all aspects of civilizationUrgent!To begin, I want to talk to you a little bit about why it is we do what we do. Climate change. It’s a complex, huge issue. We started learning more about climate change in 2007 and the more we learned, we realized climate change is THE most pressing issue of our time.Scientists overwhelmingly agree that climate change we’re seeing today is largely due to human activity. Since 1990, around the time of the industrial revolution, we have increased the amount of CO2 in our earth’s atmosphere by 30%. As a result, the climate change we’re seeing today is happening 10 times faster than at any other time in the past 1 million years – threatening lives and the livelihood of billions of people.
  • We hope we get 100% here
  • Strong majority wants this – for such a new concept, this is a very high number
  • When’s the last time you changed deodorant? High school students are creating habits that last a lifetime.A recent study by the Pew Research center found that young people care more about the environment than other generations – and that they prioritize taking action to care for it.Young people are also optimistic. “The findings presented thus far suggest that there is untapped potential to reach and engage young Americans on climate change. Young Americans are already more optimistic than their elders about the effectiveness and benefits of taking action on global warming. Moreover, roughly a third of under 35’s are open to changing their minds about global warming (41% among under 22’s).”—”The Climate Change Generation,” Yale University Study.Connected: - Young people are connected as never before viacellphones and social media, and able to spark large scale conversations and change.
  • Mission:To educate high school students on the science behind climate change and inspire them to take action to curb the causes of global warming.Vision To build a community of informed and inspired students committed to preserving our earth’s climate. With this information about climate science, our timeframe, and young people – we created ACE: Alliance for Climate Education in late 2008. Our mission is…While educating a generation of youth about the science and potential consequences of climate change is admirable, for us this is not enough –our vision is to grow a community of intention, a community of readiness committed to launching a movement that will create the systemic shift we need to combat the greatest environmental issue that we will face this centuryWe see education as the foundation for inspirationAnd inspiration as the Foundation for Activation – and that we cannot have one without the other.
  • We decided we had to do 2 things to embody our vision and address the problems I outlinedPresent peer-reviewed science from the world’s leading climate scientists Make the science cool - tell a story that sticks with high school students
  • USE THIS LANGUAGE: The ACE assembly contributed to a 58% improvement in climate science knowledge according to a recent study
  • USE THIS LANGUAGE: The ACE assembly contributed to a 58% improvement in climate science knowledge according to a recent study
  • On the individual level, we have an easy way for students to start:Our National DOT campaign – it makes taking action on climate change easy – and fun – for anyone-Ask students to share their DOT – a pledge to Do One Thing to help the environment and cool the climate-Build habits for life-All together, when you connect the DOTs it makes a big difference (AT DOT projects)This leads to the community part of our program – as we hook into our national network--On average, high school students send more than 3,000 texts/month – so we text with them--It’s the most educational text they’ll get all month--Even do contests via text message – like text in your favorite green holiday haikuWe also have a vibrant Facebook community – about 14k fans – and nearly 50,000 views on YouTube
  • Project Greenway & Hubbard
  • Help groom leaders who inspire – and can tell a story that resonates.-Ideally include local vidsShreya and Daniela are students at the Harker Upper School in San Jose, California. Their path to all-star student action began at one of ACE’s first-ever Assemblies in March of 2009 where they were engaged and hooked by climate change scienceand solutions.Shreya and Daniela were inspired to apply for an ACE grant to work on installing smart meters, an organic garden, and window insulating film at Harker. They won the ACE grant in the spring of 2009 and implemented their projects in the 2009-2010 school year. Through the energy audit they made some basic changes that save their school energy and money, like turning off the lights in the gym at night which has saved the school $10,000 to date. The school savings could total in the hundreds of thousands of dollars.Shreya and Daniela have since become members of ACE’s Youth Advisory Board, founded their own nonprofit, SmartPowerEd (smartpowered.org), and are working with schools in the Bay Area to get energy-smart. Their goal is to help 10 schoolsbecome smarter about energy. Most recently they asked a question to President Bill Clinton through YouTube’s Citizen Tube program. Here’s their question.
  • Network=email, txting, FacebookAnd we’re growing fast
  • -paleoclimatologist-park ranger-ace science guruRebecca comes to ACE from the National Park Service, where she has worked as an interpretive ranger at Rocky Mountain and Mt. Rainier National Parks. She completed her Master’s degree in geological sciences at the University of Colorado in 2007, studying ice caps on Baffin Island in the Canadian Arctic. She has also worked in Antarctica as a member of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet ice-core drilling project, where she shoveled mountains of snow, enjoyed her “arctic oven” and conducted research. She has a degree in geosciences from Williams College
  • LOCALIZE
  • Ideally provide local bios/picsFounded 2008501c3 nonprofit – not political in any way38 staff nationwideHeadquartered in Oakland CALocal Educators in: New YorkLos AngelesBostonWashington, DCChicagoHoustonAtlantaDenverAustin
  • OPTION TO ADD/REPLACE W/ LOCAL SLIDE-Expert advice for projects-National/regional scope-MAP
  • LOCALIZEWe also have many supporters. In January, we traveled to Colorado and teamed up with Disney and the Xgames to bring climate education to the main stage. There, we presented in front of thousands of youth on the slopes, and found out how the Xgames were going greenAnd, we’ve teamed up with Clif Bar to take the 2 Mile Challenge – a challenge to swap out bikes for cars to travel short distances – one that will help ACE out simultaneously.
  • Embassies?
  • Thank you!
  • ACE Overview for US State Department

    1. 1. ACE<br />The National Leader in High School Climate Education<br />
    2. 2. The science is clear<br />
    3. 3. But teens don’t understand it<br />54%<br />American teens would fail climate science<br />American Teens’ Knowledge of Climate Change, Yale Project on Climate Change Communication, 2011 http://environment.yale.edu/climate/files/American-Teens-Knowledge-of-Climate-Change.pdf<br />
    4. 4. Americans want to improve<br />68%<br />Welcome a nat’l program to educate on climate change<br />Americans’ Knowledge of Climate Change, Yale Project on Climate Change Communication, 2010 http://environment.yale.edu/climate/files/ClimateChangeKnowledge2010.pdf<br />
    5. 5. In-school education is the answer<br />75%<br />Think schools should teach kids about climate change<br />Americans’ Knowledge of Climate Change, Yale Project on Climate Change Communication, 2010 http://environment.yale.edu/climate/files/ClimateChangeKnowledge2010.pdf<br />
    6. 6. Why high school students?<br />
    7. 7. ACE’s Mission<br /><ul><li>Educate
    8. 8. Inspire
    9. 9. Activate</li></li></ul><li>The ACE Assembly<br />
    10. 10. ACE Works<br />58%<br />Improvement in climate science knowledge<br />CERAP study, Chicago Public Schools - 2010<br />
    11. 11. Award-winning<br />
    12. 12. DOT: For everybody <br />Text DOT to 30644<br />
    13. 13. Action Teams: For student leaders<br /><ul><li>Green clubs kickstart climate projects
    14. 14. Eligible for grants, trainings</li></li></ul><li>Leaders of Tomorrow, Today<br />
    15. 15. Impact - Nationwide<br /><ul><li>1M students reached
    16. 16. 1500 schools
    17. 17. 32k students in Action Teams
    18. 18. 200k students in our network</li></li></ul><li>Meet Rebecca Anderson<br />
    19. 19. Rave Reviews<br />“Amazing”<br />“Extremely impressed”<br />“The most important (and entertaining) high school assembly on the planet.”<br />“Very engaging”<br />“It was just wonderful. It was one of the best presentations we’ve had.”<br />“Unparalleled”<br />“Your presentation created a buzz around school all day”<br />“Such an overwhelming positive response”<br />“Presented in a way that younger students would really relate.”<br />“ACE really understands what it takes to reach students in this digital era”<br />Many more on:<br />http://www.acespace.org/about/buzz<br />
    20. 20. 18 Educators Across the US<br />
    21. 21. ACE Partners<br />
    22. 22. ACE Supporters<br />
    23. 23. Questions<br />How can ACE help your embassies?<br />
    24. 24. Matt Stewart<br />415.867.0999 matt.stewart@climateeducation.org<br />

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