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Startup Library Full Day Workshop: OCULA Spring Conference 2013

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The Startup Library is a crash course in entrepreneurial thinking for Library Land. It is about identifying opportunities, taking smart risks, and learning by doing. This one-day workshop will engage participants in a number of activities designed to inspire, energize, and challenge. Participants will work together to identify a problem worth solving, generate potential ideas to solve that problem, strengthen their solutions, and make a final “rocket pitch” to support their best idea.

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Startup Library Full Day Workshop: OCULA Spring Conference 2013

  1. 1. ocula 2013 fall conference ottawa public librarym.j. d’elia the startup library image: (cc) Manzabar http://www.flickr.com/photos/manzabar/5317712005/
  2. 2. welcome
  3. 3. about • librarian / manager • instructor • designer • problem solver
  4. 4. think like a startup • startups condition us for constant change • startups are about building a platform • startup is a culture (mathews, 2012, p. 4)
  5. 5. startup library: an experiment • process over product • action-based networking • making over talking • stretching ourselves (startuplibrary.ca)
  6. 6. outlineexplore foundations find problems brainstorm solutions apply startup methodology present results
  7. 7. objectives practice entrepreneurial thinking understand startup terminology encourage risk-taking have fun
  8. 8. workbook • notes • key concepts • worksheets • references
  9. 9. foundation
  10. 10. creative problem solving design thinking lean thinking innovative / creative thinking startup thinking seeking novel solutions to problems considering end-to-end customer experience gathering customer input for rapid deployment applying techniques to break assumptions searching for repeatable, sustainable solutions + + + +
  11. 11. entrepreneurial thought + action desire smart step act resultlearn / reflect bring others along stay within acceptable loss act quickly with means at hand gather data observe customers (c) Babson College
  12. 12. eta: key points • begin with desire (not passion) • iterative process • learn by doing • act with what you have • primary data vs secondary data
  13. 13. eta: smart step • means at hand • who are you? • what do you know? • whom do you know? • acceptable loss • not more than you are willing to lose
  14. 14. roadmap
  15. 15. roadmap • morning • problem finding • patron discovery • problem framing • lunch
  16. 16. roadmap (continued) • afternoon 1 • solution finding • hypotheses testing • build-measure-learn • break
  17. 17. roadmap (continued) • afternoon 2 • minimum viable product • criteria for evaluation • pivot or persevere • presentations & wrap-up
  18. 18. tip 1
  19. 19. tip 1: notice the verb you want to be using with respect to startup ideas is not ‘think up’ but ‘notice.’ (graham, 2012)
  20. 20. hot spots
  21. 21. hot spots [materials] • marker (each member) • flip chart paper (per table)
  22. 22. hot spot [definition] “...an area of high information density, clutter, stress, disorganization, or any place that has a suboptimal solution.” ~ Matt Cutts
  23. 23. tip 2
  24. 24. tip 2: few, not many ! develop for the few, not the many. (blank & dorf, 2012, p. 57)
  25. 25. patron discovery
  26. 26. patron discovery • search for problem/solution fit • seek patron input ! • problem validation = is your problem really a problem? for whom?
  27. 27. earlyvangelists • she has a problem • she knows she has a problem • she is looking for a solution • she assembled a solution out of parts • she has a budget (blank & dorf, 2012, p. 58-60)
  28. 28. who / how
  29. 29. who / how (materials) • markers • flip chart papers with three hot spots
  30. 30. who / how (instructions) • who would be most interested in each hot spot you identified? • how would you determine the problem-solution fit? • write your ideas on the chart paper • time: 7-10 minutes
  31. 31. who / how (debrief) • what did you come up with for the “how” question?
  32. 32. tip 3
  33. 33. tip 3: re-frame getting the right question is the key - phrase it for possibility (brown, 2009)
  34. 34. framing
  35. 35. framing: how might we • how might we • how - creative confidence • might - looking for possible solutions • we - the need to work together • action-oriented (brown, 2009)
  36. 36. how might we
  37. 37. how might we 1 (instructions) • generate h.m.w. statements for your three hot spots • write your ideas on your chart paper • time: 10 minutes
  38. 38. how might we 2 (instructions) • choose the h.m.w question you want to work with • write it out on a new piece of paper • tape it up near your table
  39. 39. how might we (alternatives) • hmw make eBooks a more attractive option to patrons? • hmw scale IL/library instruction to the entire campus? • hmw deliver library content and services to mobile devices?
  40. 40. how might we (alternatives) • hmw make the middle seat in the airplane the most desirable seat? ! • hmw make it easier to find hard-to- locate products in the grocery store?
  41. 41. checkpoint 1 hmw statement
  42. 42. recap • problem finding • customer finding (problem/solution fit) • problem framing
  43. 43. debrief • what was the easiest step? • what was the hardest step? • does this feel different?
  44. 44. up next • solution finding • hypotheses testing • build-measure-learn
  45. 45. lunch break startup library
  46. 46. divergent thinking
  47. 47. divergent thinking(overview) • generating ideas and options • brainstorming / ideation • anything is possible
  48. 48. divergent thinking(activities) • sticky note brainstorm • forced connections ! • goal: 75 ideas
  49. 49. tip 4
  50. 50. tip 4: diverge • Defer judgment • Combine and build ideas • Seek wild ideas • Go for quantity (osborn, 1953)
  51. 51. sticky note
  52. 52. sticky note (materials) • markers (for each member) • sticky notes (for each member) • pre-numbered flip chart paper
  53. 53. sticky note (instructions) • brainstorm solutions to hmw question • one idea / sticky note • speak to the group • hand it to facilitator • post it to the flip chart paper • time: 15 minutes
  54. 54. sticky note (debrief) • ideas flow more freely • clear objective • verbalizing helps members build on previous ideas
  55. 55. forced connections
  56. 56. forced connections (materials) • markers • sticky notes • pre-numbered flip chart paper • random images
  57. 57. forced connections (instructions) • look at random images • talk about them as a group • what do they suggest? • force yourself to make connections between images and your problem • time: 10 minutes
  58. 58. forced connections (debrief) • stimulates lateral thinking • encourages cross-pollination • focuses on the image, not the problem
  59. 59. scamper
  60. 60. scamper (materials) • markers (for each member) • sticky notes (for each member) • pre-numbered flip chart paper • scamper question cards
  61. 61. scamper (instructions) • review questions on cards • talk about them as a group • add new ideas to the flip chart paper • time: 15 minutes
  62. 62. scamper (debrief) • covers different angles on the problem • question prompts expand the brainstorming
  63. 63. checkpoint 75 + ideas
  64. 64. recap • sticky note brainstorming • forced connections • scamper
  65. 65. debrief • what was the easiest technique? • what was the hardest technique? • what did you notice?
  66. 66. convergent thinking
  67. 67. convergent thinking(overview) • selecting the best ideas and options • determine potential value • apply criteria
  68. 68. convergent thinking(activities) • highlighting • three ‘i’s
  69. 69. tip 5
  70. 70. tip 5: converge • be deliberate • check your objectives • improve your ideas • be affirmative • consider novelty (osborn, 1953)
  71. 71. highlighting
  72. 72. highlighting (materials) • 75+ ideas from divergent thinking • sticky dots (2 per member)
  73. 73. highlighting (instructions) • survey your list of ideas • each member: choose two of the most promising ideas • place your sticky dots on each idea • time: 10 minutes
  74. 74. highlighting (debrief) • allows everyone to contribute • identifies popular ideas • encourages discussion
  75. 75. three ‘i’s
  76. 76. three ‘i’s (materials) • ideas with sticky dots • from highlighting activity • three ‘i’s matrix flip chart • markers
  77. 77. three ‘i’s (instructions) • place chosen ideas in the left column • evaluate ideas according to: • imagination • impact • influence • time: 10 minutes
  78. 78. three ‘i’s (debrief) • evaluate ideas according to realistic criteria • generate team “buy-in”
  79. 79. checkpoint 2-3 promising ideas
  80. 80. recap • highlighting • three ‘i’s
  81. 81. questions • what worked with these techniques? what didn’t? • which is easier: divergent or convergent thinking?
  82. 82. tip 6
  83. 83. tip 6: get outside there are no facts inside your building, so get outside. (blank & dorf, 2012, p. 31)
  84. 84. hypotheses
  85. 85. hypotheses • educated guesses about the solution • objectives: • acknowledge assumptions • design ways to test assumptions
  86. 86. hypotheses(early stage) • market size • how many people will use your idea? • value proposition • why will they choose your solution?
  87. 87. hypotheses(early stage) • patron segments • who really needs your solution? • patron relationships/channels • how will you communicate with them?
  88. 88. hypotheses(early stage) • key resources • what does your solution rely on? • key partners • who does your solution rely on?
  89. 89. hypotheses
  90. 90. hypotheses (materials) • flip chart paper • markers
  91. 91. hypotheses (instructions) • create two columns • list hypotheses associated with your idea on the left • consider all angles • time: 10 mins
  92. 92. tip 7
  93. 93. tip 7: build, measure, learn determine what you want to learn before you build (ries, 2011)
  94. 94. b-m-l
  95. 95. entrepreneurial thought + action desire smart step act resultlearn / reflect bring others along stay within acceptable loss act quickly with means at hand gather data observe customers (c) Babson College
  96. 96. build, measure, learn • action steps • build • measure • learn
  97. 97. build, measure, learn • planning steps • learn - what do you want to know? • measure - how will you evaluate it? • build - what do you need to build?
  98. 98. b-m-l
  99. 99. b-m-l (materials) • markers • flip chart paper with hypotheses
  100. 100. b-m-l (instructions) • discuss the hypotheses you listed • add your testing strategies in the right column • who could you talk to? • how would you learn? • time: 10 mins
  101. 101. checkpoint hypotheses + tests
  102. 102. recap • hypotheses testing • build-measure-learn
  103. 103. debrief • what do you think about hypotheses testing? • how is this different than regular approaches?
  104. 104. up next • minimum viable product • criteria for evaluation • pivot or proceed • presentations • flawed approaches
  105. 105. break startup library
  106. 106. tip 8
  107. 107. tip 8: mvp build a minimum viable product with the smallest possible feature set (blank & dorf, 2012, p. 60)
  108. 108. mvp
  109. 109. minimum viable product • just the features that allow the product to reach the market • bare bones • aimed at early adopters • helps avoid building products that people don’t want
  110. 110. minimum viable product • reduce amount of wasted effort • iterate until you find the mvp • low-fidelity • does the customer care? • high-fidelity • watch adoption and use patterns
  111. 111. customer validation • attempts to attract early adopters • “test sell” at every sage • testing the entire model (as opposed to individual parts) • validating your hypotheses related to customers
  112. 112. mvp
  113. 113. mvp (materials) • markers • flip chart
  114. 114. mvp (instructions) • describe an mvp for your idea • what would you build? • what features would it have? • who would you “test sell” it to? • time: 10 minutes
  115. 115. tip 9
  116. 116. tip 9: desirability ! the best ideas answer the customer desirability question. (brown, 2009)
  117. 117. criteria
  118. 118. criteria: desirability • understanding users’ current needs • expressing latent customer desires • ethnographic techniques • observation • interviewing extreme users
  119. 119. criteria: feasibility • considering the full project scope • technical challenges • social possibility • ecological reality (sustainability) • research + development • prototyping, testing, experimentation
  120. 120. criteria: viability • remembering the economic dimension • affordable to users • generate healthy business return • research • projections, prediction, risk analysis
  121. 121. criteria: venn version desirability feasibility viability sweet spot
  122. 122. three questions • Do people want/desire this product or service? • Is this product or service technically or organizationally possible? • Does this product or service make economic sense? Adapted from: IDEO Human Centered Design: Toolkit
  123. 123. scorecard
  124. 124. scorecard (materials) • dfv scorecard (in workbook) • pens / markers
  125. 125. scorecard (instructions) • discuss each criteria as it relates to your overall solution • desirability, feasibility, viability • give each category a score out of 10 • time: 10 minutes
  126. 126. tip 10
  127. 127. tip 10: visualize ! the best way to “translate” piles of data is to make it as visual as possible. (blank & dorf, 2012, p. 430)
  128. 128. pivot
  129. 129. pivot “A pivot requires that we keep one foot rooted in what we’ve learned so far, while making a fundamental change in strategy in order to seek even greater validated learning.” ~ Eric Ries, The Lean Startup
  130. 130. pivot or proceed (continued) • pivot = change direction • not simply about change • focused on testing a new hypothesis • proceed = stay on course • continue validating hypothesis
  131. 131. pivot (examples) • zoom-in: a single feature becomes the whole product • zoom-out: the product becomes a feature in a much larger product • customer segment: switching targets to a different customer segment (ries, 2009, p. 173)
  132. 132. pivot (examples) • customer need: recognizing a different customer need than expected • engine of growth: change the way the growth strategy of the solution • channel pivot: determining a different way to deliver the same product (ries, 2009, p. 173)
  133. 133. pivot
  134. 134. pivot / proceed (materials) • pens / markers
  135. 135. pivot (instructions) • list at least three potential ways you could pivot your idea • use list of pivots from workbook • time: 10 minutes
  136. 136. checkpoint 3 pivot options
  137. 137. recap • minimum viable product • evaluation criteria • pivot / proceed
  138. 138. debrief • what do you think of the mvp concept? customer validation? • what do you think of the pivot?
  139. 139. up next • presentations • flawed approaches • wrap-up
  140. 140. reflection
  141. 141. instinct “There is no way to remove the human element--vision, intuition, judgment-- from the practice of entrepreneurship, nor would that be desirable.” ~ Eric Ries, The Lean Startup
  142. 142. wrap-up
  143. 143. assumptions
  144. 144. flawed assumption 1 “i know what the patron wants” you are not your patron (blank & dorf, 2012, p. 8-18)
  145. 145. flawed assumption 2 “i know what features to build” continuous patron contact (blank & dorf, 2012, p. 8-18)
  146. 146. flawed assumption 3 focus on the launch date understand who uses it and why (blank & dorf, 2012, p. 8-18)
  147. 147. flawed assumption 4 emphasis on execution hypothesize, test, learn, iterate (blank & dorf, 2012, p. 8-18)
  148. 148. flawed assumption 5 measure with traditional metrics adopt and expect trial and error (blank & dorf, 2012, p. 8-18)
  149. 149. flawed assumption 6 build one-size-fits all solutions develop for the few, not the many (blank & dorf, 2012, p. 8-18)
  150. 150. think like a startup • startups condition us for constant change • startups are about building a platform • startup is a culture (mathews, 2012, p. 4)
  151. 151. thank you ! m.j. d’elia mdelia@uoguelph.ca @mjdelia startuplibrary.ca
  152. 152. references Berger, W. (2012, Sep 17). The secret phrase top innovators use [Blog post]. http://blogs.hbr.org/2012/09/the-secret-phrase-top-innovato/ Blank, S. & Dorf, B. (2012). The Startup Owner’s Manual. Pescadero, CA: K&S Ranch. Brown, T. (2009). Change by Design. 2nd ed. New York: Harper Business. Creative Education Foundation. (2010). The foundations of applied imagination (workbook). Amherst, MA: Creative Education Foundation Press. Cutts, M. (2010, July 19). How to find start-up ideas. Matt Cutts Blog. Retrieved from http://www.mattcutts.com/blog/business-ideas/ Graham, P. (2012). How to get startup ideas [Blog post]. http://paulgraham.com/ startupideas.html
  153. 153. references (continued) Greenberg, D., McKone-Sweet, K. & Wilson, H. J. (2011). The New entrepreneurial leader. San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler Publishers. Kiefer, C. F., Schlesinger, L. A. & Brown, P. B. (2010). Action trumps everything. Duxbury, MA: Black Ink Press IDEO. (2011). Human-Centered Design Toolkit. 2nd ed. Retrieved from http://www.ideo.com Mathews, B. (2013). Think Like a Startup [White paper]. http://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/ handle/10919/18649 Osborn, A. (1953/1963). Applied Imagination. Amherst, MA: Creative Education Foundation. Osterwalder, A. & Pigneur, Y. (2010). Business model generation. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley. Ries, E. (2011). The Lean Startup. New York: Crown Business.
  154. 154. the end.

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