Enterprise CustomerExperienceMitch LiebermanJanuary 2013
Enterprise Costumer Experience Mitch Lieberman                                               2/17Executive SummaryCustomer...
Enterprise Costumer Experience Mitch Lieberman                                                 3/17Data, Time and RespectD...
Enterprise Costumer Experience Mitch Lieberman                                                    4/17emotional response, ...
Enterprise Costumer Experience Mitch Lieberman                                               5/17That which executives thi...
Enterprise Costumer Experience Mitch Lieberman                                                6/17“Customer Experience is ...
Enterprise Costumer Experience Mitch Lieberman                                                7/17As competition for time ...
Enterprise Costumer Experience Mitch Lieberman                                                 8/17Social CRM is the Start...
Enterprise Costumer Experience Mitch Lieberman                                             9/17 “Customers interact with a...
Enterprise Costumer Experience Mitch Lieberman                                              10/17They are not the same thi...
Enterprise Costumer Experience Mitch Lieberman                                                               11/17        ...
Enterprise Costumer Experience Mitch Lieberman                                                    12/17How do these pieces...
Enterprise Costumer Experience Mitch Lieberman                                              13/17ConclusionIt is time to m...
Enterprise Costumer Experience Mitch Lieberman                                             14/17Complete the Enterprise Cu...
Enterprise Costumer Experience Mitch Lieberman                                              15/17AboutMitch LiebermanManag...
DRI is a global consultancy company.With offices in five countries and successfullydelivered projects worldwide, DRI helps...
Enterprise Customer Experience
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Enterprise Customer Experience

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Customer Experience is the superset of sensations, emotions and perceptions felt by your customers before, during and after product or service use. Experiences are created through interactions with things, people and the surroundings. Sharing of experiences happens across both physical and digital worlds, from a smile or a laugh, to a smiley face emoticon. The boundaries between physical and digital are blurring, even merging. Instant feedback, instant photos, instant communications, shared easily, quickly and without hesitation, or forethought. People like to share their experiences with their family, friends, co-workers and in general with the world around them. It is not only possible to capture, understand and learn from all of these digital interactions, but, the future of business just might depend on it and doing so requires planning and execution.
Enterprise Customer Experience represents the people, processes and technology required to listen, guide and engage your customers in the digital world; all towards creating personalized therefore enhanced experiences. Just like the real world, in the digital space, experience cannot be given, but can be designed, enabled and carefully considered. The simple idea is to learn from what is shared, turn it into information, provide insights to people that need it and then actions to be executed, all to further enhance the customer experience. There are a lot of moving parts, including technology as one, along with people and process. The imperative is to start with listening and progress to insights, actions and knowledge.
Each digital interaction creates data, which leads to information that when properly leveraged creates insights. When something is good, can you repeat it, when something is bad, how quickly can it be changed, altered? Each customer interaction is an opportunity to learn and grow. From first Ad impression and Website visit, to product purchase, product use, service interaction, receiving a bill or talking to support, each element has a unique input to, and impact on, customer experience.
 The technology, how it is used by people and the process required; that 
is what we are seeking to describe in this short paper.

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Enterprise Customer Experience

  1. 1. Enterprise CustomerExperienceMitch LiebermanJanuary 2013
  2. 2. Enterprise Costumer Experience Mitch Lieberman 2/17Executive SummaryCustomer Experience is the superset of sensations, emotions and perceptions felt by yourcustomers before, during and after product or service use. Experiences are created throughinteractions with things, people and the surroundings. Sharing of experiences happensacross both physical and digital worlds, from a smile or a laugh, to a smiley face emoticon. Theboundaries between physical and digital are blurring, even merging. Instant feedback, instantphotos, instant communications, shared easily, quickly and without hesitation, or forethought.People like to share their experiences with their family, friends, co-workers and in general withthe world around them. It is not only possible to capture, understand and learn from all of thesedigital interactions, but, the future of business just might depend on it and doing so requiresplanning and execution.Enterprise Customer Experience represents the people, processes and technology required tolisten, guide and engage your customers in the digital world; all towards creating personalizedtherefore enhanced experiences. Just like the real world, in the digital space, experiencecannot be given, but can be designed, enabled and carefully considered. The simple idea is tolearn from what is shared, turn it into information, provide insights to people that need it andthen actions to be executed, all to further enhance the customer experience. There are a lot ofmoving parts, including technology as one, along with people and process. The imperative is tostart with listening and progress to insights, actions and knowledge.Each digital interaction creates data, which leads toinformation that when properly leveraged creates insights.When something is good, can you repeat it, when something isbad, how quickly can it be changed, altered? Each customerinteraction is an opportunity to learn and grow. From first Adimpression and Website visit, to product purchase, productuse, service interaction, receiving a bill or talking to support, CUSTOMEReach element has a unique input to, and impact on, customer EXexperience. The technology, how it is used by people and the PERIENCESprocess required; that is what we are seeking to describe inthis short paper.
  3. 3. Enterprise Costumer Experience Mitch Lieberman 3/17Data, Time and RespectData flows rapidly and takes many forms; its value isunparalleled within your organization.Raw data is both a blessing and a curse. The volume and velocity make data management arequired and important discipline. The real value is the information gleaned from data, butthere is a lot of noise as well. Information is properly filtered, analyzed and interpreteddata. Then, to make further progress, information needs to be accurate, timely, contextualand useful. In the networked world, information disperses like fallen leaves on a windy day.It was once it was about broadcast, then it progressed to push and pull and now it is aboutnotifications, aggregation and conversations. What is said is important, but how it is said; tone,channel and timing is important, as it adds the context. Information flow is complex, almostchaotic. One person’s information might just be another person’s data or vice versa.Time is a precious commodity, it needs to be considered and valued. Showing respect for timeis equivalent to showing respect for a person. In the abstract, time is without limits, in reality,time is finite. A day has twenty-four hours, a week seven days. Attention is the time you have tomake your point, often measured in seconds, on the screen, through a text or in a conversation.Attention needs to be fought for and it is easily lost. Time spent is an investment, a decisionto part with something that cannot be returned or recaptured. You are considering, right now,whether to keep reading, I need to be aware of this and respect it.Do you show respect for people’s time?Access to information is the lowest common denominator. It is about simplicity in presentation;consistency across interaction points and it needs to be easy to understand. A positive andfulfilling user experience, during information access, is the objective and your differentiator.As you consider how your information is delivered and interpreted, you may not anticipate an
  4. 4. Enterprise Costumer Experience Mitch Lieberman 4/17emotional response, but there is one there. The digital age has raised expectations. Peoplewant and expect answers, quickly, in context and through the channel of their choosing. Theemotions felt during information access and delivery are as critical as the information itself.Information is remembered, emotions make an impact.66% of customers say that valuing their time isthe most important thing that a company can do toprovide good services.Consider the emotional elements, such as the experience or frustration felt by a consumerdigging around your website as they try to find a phone number that you have carefully hiddento reduce call volume. This is only one example of wasted time, I am sure you can think ofmany more. The solution is complex and everyone has an opinion, from the web designer andbusiness analyst to the CEO. We need to admit that sometimes the executive team can beoverly influenced by recent press and self-proclaimed experts. A little bit of caution is advised. CUSTOMER COMPANY TOUCH POINTS Improving Experience Talks about you Social Media, Media, Corporate Data LISTENING
  5. 5. Enterprise Costumer Experience Mitch Lieberman 5/17That which executives think “should” be adequate technological capabilities really need to becollaborative discussions. Organizations need to listen, measure and analyze data in order tomeet expectations, driving a perceived customer experience.Are you listening or just waiting to talk?Both customer service and marketing, fall under the Customer Experience umbrella, but toooften take differing approaches to experience. One group is charged with keeping customerscoming back, while the other is charged with creating new customers. Customer perceptionsand experiences felt during all interactions are critically important components of brand image,both for new and existing customers. How many times do you personally enjoy punching in youraccount code and then repeating it to an agent? There is broad agreement that organizationsdo look to customer service as a way to drive loyalty, something marketing cares deeply about.Within customer service it is necessary to expand the focus from inefficiencies in process,infrastructure and operations to delivering an excellent service experience across all channels.This is hard work and is more than just technology.Customer experience is not a process, thus is very hard to manage. An experience is visceralresponse, it cannot be given and it is personal. I can prepare the meal, I cannot tell you howit tastes. However, platforms and applications can and should be used to provide a pointof reference for an individual; I might know your tastes and can alter the meal preparationaccordingly. Using information and insights will help you to lead and guide customers on ajourney. Experiences are human, a response to stimulus, or in some cases lack of stimuli(think waiting in a line). Experiences are individual, but influenced by groups and community.An experience might determine future behavior. If the roller coaster made me sick, I am notgoing on it again. If a buying experience is bad, a customer service experience frustratingor a marketing message insulting, the customer will leave and not come back. As marketers,technologists and leaders, we do our best to design what we hope will be positive experiences.Key point: technology, platforms and applications can help. However, tools should not beexpected to manage people, nor experiences, tools are guides and enablers.
  6. 6. Enterprise Costumer Experience Mitch Lieberman 6/17“Customer Experience is a team sport”Kerry Bodine, ForresterIn addition to the tools and technology, marketing, sales, support and even operations willneed to better collaborate and make sure that customer expectations can and will be met.Expectations are a funny thing; they change. People expect emails to be answered, consumersexpect a high-speed network from our hotel and no one expects food on our next flight (thoughwe do hope). Can you manage the changing expectations of your customers? How hard is it toroll out something new?Your team loves the new stuff, but hates to changeMany organizations will consider design thinking and rapid iterations of ideation andprototyping. Do you have a platform that can meet this need? Do you have a technologyframework, along with a trained team and a process defined to meet your needs, present andfuture? Do you know what your customers are saying? The challenge is to make sure effortsare coordinated, technology is accessible and data is available across the organization.Companies need to focus and work very hard to deliver a unified customer experience.However, unification across today’s multichannel systems, across what are at best looselycoupled systems and siloed organizational structures is a massive challenge. At best, websitesand contact center conversations fail to reflect key brand attributes. At worst, companiesforce customers to wade through disjointed information and repetitive tasks as they movefrom channel to channel and interaction to interaction. The root cause is a set of disparatesystems and functional silos that don’t play well together; this will not work in 2013! To unifyexperiences across all channels, you need an approach, a strategy, goals and objectives; allrequired to enhance their customer’s experience, at each touch-point, with their organization.Organizations need to think more holistically about social; media, networks and business. Mostcompanies’ social initiatives have so far focused on marketing and, to a lesser extent, customerservice. Unfortunately, social behaviors that are limited to being fans of brands on Facebookand asking for help on Twitter are shortsighted tactics with questionable success metrics.
  7. 7. Enterprise Costumer Experience Mitch Lieberman 7/17As competition for time and attention intensifies, companies must fight to gain the advantage.Only by guiding the consumer through a personalized, intuitive and cohesive experience can abusiness hope to provide the information and incentives to produce the conversions necessaryto assure success. Instead, firms most often are saddled with a legacy of loosely coupledsystems and siloed organizational structures that make this challenge nearly impossible toaccomplish. At best, websites and call center conversations fail to reflect key brand attributes.At worst, companies force customers to wade through disjointed information and repetitivetasks as they move from channel to channel and interaction to interaction.The need for an improved experience has become clear in the current digital landscape. It isno longer just about presenting static content, it is about dynamic personalized experience.Web Experience Management (WEM), is a discipline specifically focusing on this new approachto content. The consumer must be guided step by step through the digital experience, acrossall platforms and through the community or social media experience. When combined withinformation, such as preferences, and context, the content is not only dynamic, it is relevant.
  8. 8. Enterprise Costumer Experience Mitch Lieberman 8/17Social CRM is the Starting Point for EnterpriseCustomer ExperienceAre we talking about Customer Experience, Customer Service Experience or Social CRM?Do the differences really matter to anyone other than academics and analysts? CustomerExperience is quite big and cannot be managed (as discussed) any more than relationships canbe managed. Customer Service Experience is also a subset of Customer Experience; SocialCRM exists in the same way, it is part of the solution, integrated within a good EnterpriseCustomer Experience framework. Social CRM is the end-game of Social Media and the startingpoint for Enterprise Customer Experience.“Quality in a service or product is not what you putinto it. It is what the client or customer gets out of it”Peter DruckerPutting Mr. Drucker’s comments into proper context for this discussion; a CustomerExperience is not what you design it to be, it is what a customer perceives it to be. I would alsoadd that managing experiences or perceptions is very difficult (Hollywood and Walt Disney canmanage perceptions, most businesses cannot).The maturation of social media initiatives and programs to Social CRM can and will help byproviding “integrated insights to improve customer experiences”, (IBM IBV). The far-reaching impact of attempting to manage customer experiences include all of the customercommunication touch points, individual engagement, as well as many many other touch points.
  9. 9. Enterprise Costumer Experience Mitch Lieberman 9/17 “Customers interact with a company’s employeesand partners either directly or via someintermediating technology” Kerry Bodine, ForresterCRM (Social or not) does not include a display ad, the flavor of the coffee, the watertemperature in the shower nor the firmness of the mattress. However, these elements are allcritical to the customer experience, but removed from the CRM system. Where CRM becomesimportant is when it is time to store information that can impact the next interaction, orunderstand a current issue in context. If a company is interacting directly with a person, andthe channel of communication is public; aka social media, then the term Social CRM makessense. The benefit of social communication, when used correctly, is about proper engagement,thus needs to be part of the broader communication goals and objectives. A mature CustomerExperience vision is bigger than CRM and Social CRM but does need to include both if thestrategy is to be considered complete.The constant debate of trying to separate out people and process from technology is tough,but important. Service excellence is achieved by an almost harmonious dance between thepeople, processes and technological components. This can be stated for both Social CRMand Customer Experience, but each is distinct and has a place.Cause and EffectApplications that house customer information should be used to support customerexperiences, such as delivering the right information, at the right time, in context. However,customer experience cannot drive an internal application, but it should drive requirements,such as data that could be used to positively impact the experience. Customer RelationshipManagement (CRM) applications are often mistaken for Customer Experience applications, butthey are not the same, and caution is advised not to confuse the two.Lessons learned and listening to voice of the customer can impact what data is stored andhow to act, of course. CRM is an enabling strategy and technology, used by people inside theorganization. Where CRM gets a bad reputation is when people believe that CRM and SFA(Sales Force Automation) are the same thing.
  10. 10. Enterprise Costumer Experience Mitch Lieberman 10/17They are not the same thing, SFA is an inward focused, manage the pipeline, manage salesprocess, manage money and very often does not do much to provide external value. CustomerExperience is an SFA afterthought, it just is!When your CRM system becomes ‘digitally aware’ or ‘gets Social’ that is the time when theenterprise is prepared to embrace a modern customer experience. A focused Social CRMprogram will embrace those customers who now want to have a say in the boundaries of thecustomer / company conversation. Social CRM takes into consideration how, when and wherea company engages in a conversation and the impact to the customer. The word Social isoverused and more often than not the reference is actually to digital communications, sharedpublicly.There is a difference between hearing and listening. It is possible that it is one of thosetopics that you do not think too much about, but now that I am bringing it up, it makes sense.According to the Oxford Dictionary, the definition of hearing is “the faculty of perceivingsounds” whereas listening is to “take notice of and act on what someone says.” So, hearing isthe physical part, but listening is a cognitive or conscious response to what has been heard.
  11. 11. Enterprise Costumer Experience Mitch Lieberman 11/17 Customer gets a better, more personalized experience CUSTOMER TOUCH POINTS Improved Experience Social Media Talks with you Media Corporate Data BI Reporting Collaboration SOCIAL FILTERED DATA Knowledge Metrics Management LISTENING AND COLLABORATING CRM/BPM Predictive Document REAL TIME Analytics Management ANALYTICS CMS Marketing Automation
  12. 12. Enterprise Costumer Experience Mitch Lieberman 12/17How do these pieces fit together?Listening is important, but if actions do not result, then it is not really listening at all. If you donot plan to take any actions based on what you hear, are you really listening? There are manyways to prove that you are listening. One way is transparency, allowing people to see insidethe organization where they can witness what you are doing. A second, more interesting wayto prove that you are listening is to be open. Open suggests that a consumer cannot only seethrough the window, but can walk through the front door and participate in the process. It isimportant to make sure that you are doing more than just hearing, in order to do that, you mightneed to be more than just be transparent. Monitoring and hearing are pointless if you do notplan on doing anything about what you find.The crucial part is that the process must be more than listening or proving that you arelistening. Actions are great, but in order to improve customer experience, you, your teamand the whole organization needs to convert the listening to information that can be usedto collaborate, co-create and engage at a personal level with your customers. This will takeanalyzing the data, providing relevant, consistent content, where and when your customerswant it, need it and are expecting it.
  13. 13. Enterprise Costumer Experience Mitch Lieberman 13/17ConclusionIt is time to move beyond what needs to be doneand why it needs to be done.Some parts of your organization are more advanced than others, some are ready and someare not. The starting point should be clear. What is less clear is exactly HOW to progress in auniform fashion from understanding what needs to be done, to actually doing it. It is time toprogress from departmental Social Media initiatives to organizational digital communicationprograms. These programs should have defined and coordinated objectives. As the team andunderstanding of the technology mature, Social CRM is next logical step, with both businessand technical integration and a digitally aware customer data model. Internally, CRM will havecertain objectives, but it is time to add customer centricity, directed individual engagementand customer collaboration to those objectives.Use Social CRM to set the course for creating better Customer Experiences, through:Evolve your Organization and execute CRM, across the Enterprise:
  14. 14. Enterprise Costumer Experience Mitch Lieberman 14/17Complete the Enterprise Customer Experience vision, including:Now you are ready for Enterprise Customer Experience as a defined discipline within yourorganization!
  15. 15. Enterprise Costumer Experience Mitch Lieberman 15/17AboutMitch LiebermanManaging Partner at DRIMitch is recognized by his peers as one of the world’sthought leaders in Social CRM. He is always on theforefront of ideas, strategies, and technologies.Mitch’s passion is solving business problems by creating the optimal alignment ofpeople, processes, and technology. Leveraging his 20 years of experience in productmanagement, systems architecture (including both transactional and analytical businessapplications), implementation services, and strategy development, Mitch guides clients inmany areas. He has continuously shown his leadership in developing and delivering strategies for creativesolutions that integrate cloud computing, open source software, customer relationshipmanagement (CRM) platforms, and an innovative combination of social media with traditionalCRM offerings. He has now set his sights on aligning these technologies to put the focus backwhere it belongs, customers and their experience.
  16. 16. DRI is a global consultancy company.With offices in five countries and successfullydelivered projects worldwide, DRI helpsorganizations to foster engagement and enhancecustomer experience through digital channels.DRI has 4 main areas of application focus: Web,Platforms, Mobile and Emerging Media; allconnected to our CRM, Social CRM and BusinessIntelligence solutions.DRI builds innovative solutions using agile methodsthat lead to a perfect match between technologyand functional/business needs.

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