How to make a video - Part 1: Video Production Basics

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How to make a video - Part 1: Video Production Basics

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  • Thanks for the information. I have been wanting to learn more about video production in Boston MA. It is a fun industry.
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  • Yes thank you very much indeed. Very helpful slides for a teacher new to the topic such as myself.
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  • Thanks You for sharing !

    http://www.e-rachat-credits.fr/
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How to make a video - Part 1: Video Production Basics

  1. 1. Presents HOW TO MAKE A VIDEO Instructor: Kris Brewer Brew@mit.edu http://techtv.mit.edu/
  2. 2. Typical Video Production Workflow Project Idea/Story (Script, Casting, etc.) Shooting/Filming (Video, Audio - Primary and B Roll, etc.) Editing (Sequencing, adding music/VOs, etc.) Output (Compression for Web, print to video - DVD, VHS, etc.) Posting (TV, Films, Internet - MIT TechTV, YouTube, etc.) Public View Final Product http://techtv.mit.edu/
  3. 3. PRE-PRODUCTION Thinking up a story http://techtv.mit.edu/
  4. 4. Conceptualizing The Edited Program * What are your objectives? * How will this video be used? * What is your budget? * What source material will be used? * How will you distribute this video? * What is the target audience? * What is the title of your project? * What will the project look like? (Storyboard) * Do you have performance copyrights and location releases? http://techtv.mit.edu/
  5. 5. Examples Giant Leaps - http://techtv.mit.edu/videos/3155-span-classhighlightgiantspan-leaps ZigZag Express Episode #18 - http://techtv.mit.edu/videos/534-zigzag-express-episode-18 Vladimir Bulovic on OLED Displays - http://techtv.mit.edu/videos/3175-vladimir-bulovic-on-oled-displays Keep Lawrence Clean - http://techtv.mit.edu/videos/2652-keep-lawrence-clean Sustainability at MIT: Greening MIT's Campus and Beyond - http://techtv.mit.edu/videos/1706-sustainability-at-mit-greening-mits-campus-and-beyond http://techtv.mit.edu/
  6. 6. Cameras There are many cameras and many formats Still or Video Analog v. Digital HD v. SD Interlaced v. Progressive Film, Tape or Disc http://techtv.mit.edu/
  7. 7. PRODUCTION Getting your footage http://techtv.mit.edu/
  8. 8. Lighting On a person (3-way lighting): •Key Light - main light 45 degree angle •Fill light - less intense 45 degree angle opposite Key •Back light - less intense behind subject just off camera http://techtv.mit.edu/
  9. 9. Sound Choose the right type of Mic: • interviews - handheld or lavalier (cardioids or omni) • action - shotgun (directional) • area noise - stereo (omni-directional) Camera Mac or External Mic: • most cameras have a built in mic but the range usually isn’t very good (6 - 10 ft) and it may pick up everything including camera noise. • external mics give you a wide range of options (make sure your camera has a mic input) http://techtv.mit.edu/
  10. 10. Set / Scenery Pay attention to where you are shooting: • background noise (cars, trains, a/c units, etc.) • light sources (sun, room lights, flashing lights) be aware that lighting can change while you shoot, so the more you can control it, the better • distractions (background scenery, people, other) The more control you have, the easier it is to shoot. Studios give you the most control since they are built to control lighting, sound, and everything else video. http://techtv.mit.edu/
  11. 11. POST-PRODUCTION PREP How to prepare for the editing process http://techtv.mit.edu/
  12. 12. Logging To get ready to edit efficiently, the best thing to do is to review your footage and log it. Use the following logging format with your word processor, spreadsheet or database program • Reel number [followed by a tab]. Use three digit numbers starting with 101 In-point Formatted as hour:minute:second, such as 01:10:12. • The in and out can be within a couple of seconds, so you can ignore frame numbers on the windows dub/timecode display • 2-3 word name for clip/shot • Description of up to 10 words including the first and last few words of the segment • Priority. Place an asterisk next to clips you like, two *s next to clips you like even better, etc. No limit to number of *s you can use • Carriage return at end of line Here is a sample screening log: REEL IN-POINT OUT-POINT CLIP NAME IN-CUE AND OUT-CUE PRIORITY 101 09:02:13 09:02:34 Porter One of great… Rudolph, Jewett ** 101 08:29:55 08:30:11 Pierce There was Andy… only one * building 102 10:00:29 10:00:44 Lincoln House to woods… from above **** http://techtv.mit.edu/
  13. 13. Scripting Edit Scripts and Outlines: The “Paper” Edit An edit script or outline communicates a general idea about how the video might flow. This step, although optional, can make sure the structure of the first rough edit matches your vision. To prepare an edit script, simply copy and paste the complete information for each clip (the full line of text) into a new document in the order you wish. * Prepare visual elements o Provide existing print or other graphic designs o Create a list of participants and other titles o Write text for full-frame graphic screens o Prepare a full list of credits including all participants * Music preparation o You can choose music from several libraries for a reasonable fee o Remember that commercially-recorded music is protected by copyright o Use a rights-clearing house to purchase rights o Use local musician’s recordings for a small fee or in exchange for credit (Creative Commons) http://techtv.mit.edu/
  14. 14. Hands-on / Q&A Let’s take a look at cameras, mics, lights, etc. http://techtv.mit.edu/
  15. 15. Homework Pick a subject (something new to you on campus, a person, a place, a thing, etc.) Make a 1 - 2 minute summary video of your subject • write your outline and scene shots • get your footage • compile your extras (graphics, music, other) • digitize and log your footage • start editing a rough cut if you’re up for it http://techtv.mit.edu/

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