Diminishing workforce presentaion

463 views

Published on

An analysis of statistical information that leads to the conclusion of a future shortage of unskilled labour in Canada

Published in: Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
463
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
5
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • With population aging and moving into 15 years or older category, we are seeing higher population entering the workforce, however we are also seeing a population staying in school and postponing entering the workforce. With an aging population retiring and not as many young people to replace them and their desire to remain in school to obtain degrees and diplomas, we are facing a labour shortage in the future.
  • Diminishing workforce presentaion

    1. 1. The Diminishing Workforce<br />
    2. 2. Canadian Population<br />
    3. 3. Canadian Population<br />In 2001, there were 16 million workers between 25 and 64 years of age<br />
    4. 4. Canadian Population<br />In 2001, there were 16 million workers between 25 and 64 years of age<br />In 6 short years, 30% of the Canadian population will be between 41 and 60 years of age.<br />
    5. 5. Canadian Population<br />At that time, the Canadian population aged 21 to 40,(set to replace the aging workforce) will only be 27%.<br />27%<br />In 2001, there were 16 million workers between 25 and 64 years of age<br />In 6 short years, 30% of the Canadian population will be between 41 and 60 years of age.<br />
    6. 6. Canadian Labour Force Characteristics<br />There is a steady increase in the Canadian Population age 15 years and over<br />
    7. 7. Canadian Labour Force Characteristics<br />As well as an increase in the Labour Force (the number of Canadians participating in the workforce – either employed or unemployed)<br />
    8. 8. Canadian Labour Force Characteristics<br />When we look at the participation rate (the percentage of population participating in the labour force) there is a steady decline, or an increase in the population not participating in the labour force. Statistics indicate that the population is staying in school longer and postponing employment.<br />
    9. 9. Education Levels of Traditionalists(1991 census)<br />In 1991, 51.7% of Traditionalist (those born between 1922 and 1945) did not obtain a high school diploma, 18.5% obtained their high school diploma, 10.6% acquired a trade and 19.2% obtained a post-secondary degree or diploma<br />
    10. 10. Education Levels of Traditionalists(2001 census)<br />Between 1991 and 2001, we see 4.25% of traditionalists moving from not having a high school diploma to obtaining a post-secondary degree or diploma. <br />
    11. 11. Education Levels of Baby Boomers(1991 census)<br />In 1991, 23.95% of Baby Boomers (those born between 1945 and 1964) did not obtain their high school diploma, 27.5% completed high school, 13.7% acquired a trade and 34.9% completed some post-secondary education. We see higher educational levels for baby boomers in 1991 than for Traditionalists.<br />
    12. 12. Education Levels of Baby Boomers(2001 census)<br />Between 1991 and 2001, we see 5.3% of baby boomers obtaining a post-secondary degree or diploma. <br />
    13. 13. Education Level by Generation(2001 census)<br />We can see each successive generation obtain higher levels of education than the previous generation. <br />
    14. 14. Which leads us to ask, with not enough younger Canadians to replace retiring workers in the future, and more of the younger population staying in school longer, who will fill those jobs requiring less skill ? <br />

    ×