Website Usability Without
Bogging Down
Emily Mitchell
Webmaster Librarian
June 12, 2014
Old homepage:
New homepage:
Quick?
Leo Reynolds. (2006). “Clocks 2 [photos].” Retrieved from http://www.flickr.com/photos/lwr/103199569/ CC-BY-NC-SA
Huge project requiring mad skills?
Olga Diez (Caliope). (2007). “Atlas [photograph].” Retrieved from
http://www.flickr.com...
What questions do you want to
answer?
Web analytics:
● What’s actually getting
used?
What questions do you want to
answer?
Survey to students:
● What’s the most recent thing
you’ve done on the library
websit...
How do you get them to answer?
kris krüg. (2010). “Speed Skating Lessons in Prince George, BC [Photo].” Retrieved from htt...
What questions do you want to
answer?
Survey to and meeting with librarians:
● What are some things students
MUST be able ...
A survey AND a meeting??
Joe Shlabotnik. (2009). “Yes! [Photo].” Retrieved from https://www.flickr.com/photos/joeshlabotni...
What questions do you want to
answer?
Card sorting:
● How will we organize
what we’ve decided
to put on the page?
How do you get them to volunteer?
chichacha. (2008). “Coffee in the Morning [photo].” Retrieved from https://www.flickr.co...
Give yourself time to analyze!
Give yourself time to analyze!
What questions do you want to
answer?
First-click testing:
● Where would you click if I
asked you to do X?
What questions do you want to
answer?
Think-aloud usability testing
● Can students complete
these tasks?
● What process do...
What questions do you want to
answer?
Librarian survey & meeting after 1st
draft:
● Is anything missing that would impair
...
And before you start...
So what about that important page
that no one is using?
● What might be causing the
lack of use?
Adam Fagen. (2011). “The ...
Questions?
Erich Ferdinand. (2009). “What’s for lunch? [photo].” Retrieved
from https://www.flickr.com/photos/erix/3780828...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

SUNYLA 2014: Website Usability Without Bogging Down

244 views

Published on

Wouldn’t it be great if libraries could collaborate with our users to make our websites better? But getting user input takes exorbitant amounts of time, effort, money, or mad skills--doesn’t it? Come hear how one librarian is working with library stakeholders plus users and their data to find quick, high-quality solutions to her library website’s problems. We’ll touch on website analytics, task analysis, first-click testing, and what to do about that important page that no one is using.

Published in: Technology, Sports
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
244
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • intro. I came to Oswego in November.
  • We started with this...
  • ...and I spent all last semester turning it into this.
  • I just spend a whole semester on our homepage… but I’m only one person, can’t devote all my time to it, have never done anything like this before, and the homepage needed ALL the questions answered.
  • It’s just like being on a (good) committee, except you’re working to get feedback from different students all the time, instead of from a fixed group of faculty/staff members. It really is a collaboration.
  • Google Analytics (custom reports are lovely!), and Crazy Egg makes lovely, lovely heat maps
  • Also, “What annoys you about the library website?” and “What do you wish were easier (or possible!) to do on the library website?”... but those didn’t really yield much information that was useful. Concrete sorts of things seem to work best.
  • Answer: Be fast. No one can say no to a two-question survey; everyone can say no to a 10-question survey.
  • NOTE: stakeholders may change depending on what page/section you’re looking at--but these are pretty standard questions
  • Why do both? Hear the quiet people. Hear the busy people who can’t come to the meeting. Avoid being put on the spot. Give yourself time to cool off when someone says something that annoys you.
  • gift cards for the cafe! and a willingness to be stood up.
  • It took me a couple of days to figure out how to get from this...
  • ...to this. But this diagram has been IMMENSELY useful.
  • The fact that this takes two minutes or less to do means you can talk to LOTS of different people. This image is the “Get Help” scenario. You can see that they had some trouble with it. “Get Help” is something I redid drastically before my next draft.
  • This let me control the conversation. It’s not about “Do you like it”--it’s about “Will this work.” I give this approach credit for the fact that I was able to keep moving quickly, and everyone is still speaking to me after I redid our homepage.
    I think this was when we realized that I had forgotten to include reference resources.
  • This let me control the conversation. It’s not about “Do you like it”--it’s about “Will this work.” I give this approach credit for the fact that I was able to keep moving quickly, and everyone is still speaking to me after I redid our homepage.
  • And stick to it. But make sure there’s some wiggle room at the end; you never know what’s going to come up! Also, having some breathing space will enable you to see errors you were too close to the project to see before.

    Pro tip: Start at the end, with your desired go-live date. Then schedule backwards from there.
  • SUNYLA 2014: Website Usability Without Bogging Down

    1. 1. Website Usability Without Bogging Down Emily Mitchell Webmaster Librarian June 12, 2014
    2. 2. Old homepage:
    3. 3. New homepage:
    4. 4. Quick? Leo Reynolds. (2006). “Clocks 2 [photos].” Retrieved from http://www.flickr.com/photos/lwr/103199569/ CC-BY-NC-SA
    5. 5. Huge project requiring mad skills? Olga Diez (Caliope). (2007). “Atlas [photograph].” Retrieved from http://www.flickr.com/photos/caliope-olga/466468766/ CC-NC-SA
    6. 6. What questions do you want to answer? Web analytics: ● What’s actually getting used?
    7. 7. What questions do you want to answer? Survey to students: ● What’s the most recent thing you’ve done on the library website? ● What’s something we should NOT change about the library website? [F]oxymoron. (2010). “A Wild Question [photo].” Retrieved from http://www.flickr.com/photos/f-oxymoron/5005673112/ CC-BY
    8. 8. How do you get them to answer? kris krüg. (2010). “Speed Skating Lessons in Prince George, BC [Photo].” Retrieved from https://www.flickr.com/photos/kk/4324005152 CC-BY-SA
    9. 9. What questions do you want to answer? Survey to and meeting with librarians: ● What are some things students MUST be able to do on our homepage? ● What should we keep? ● What should we get rid of? [F]oxymoron. (2010). “A Wild Question [photo].” Retrieved from http://www.flickr.com/photos/f-oxymoron/5005673112/ CC-BY
    10. 10. A survey AND a meeting?? Joe Shlabotnik. (2009). “Yes! [Photo].” Retrieved from https://www.flickr.com/photos/joeshlabotnik/3584172834 CC-BY-NC-SA
    11. 11. What questions do you want to answer? Card sorting: ● How will we organize what we’ve decided to put on the page?
    12. 12. How do you get them to volunteer? chichacha. (2008). “Coffee in the Morning [photo].” Retrieved from https://www.flickr.com/photos/chichacha/2471138966 CC-BY
    13. 13. Give yourself time to analyze!
    14. 14. Give yourself time to analyze!
    15. 15. What questions do you want to answer? First-click testing: ● Where would you click if I asked you to do X?
    16. 16. What questions do you want to answer? Think-aloud usability testing ● Can students complete these tasks? ● What process do they use to do so? Why? themepap. (2011). “Usability test [photo].” Retrieved from http://www.flickr.com/photos/themepap/6053434180/ CC BY-NC.
    17. 17. What questions do you want to answer? Librarian survey & meeting after 1st draft: ● Is anything missing that would impair your work at the desk, hamper your teaching, etc? ● Are there any visual elements that you think distract from the usefulness of the site? [F]oxymoron. (2010). “A Wild Question [photo].” Retrieved from http://www.flickr.com/photos/f-oxymoron/5005673112/ CC-BY
    18. 18. And before you start...
    19. 19. So what about that important page that no one is using? ● What might be causing the lack of use? Adam Fagen. (2011). “The Scientific Method [photo].” Retrieved from https://www.flickr.com/photos/afagen/6730565215 CC-BY-NC-SA
    20. 20. Questions? Erich Ferdinand. (2009). “What’s for lunch? [photo].” Retrieved from https://www.flickr.com/photos/erix/3780828260 CC-BY

    ×