Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Character Design

9,519 views

Published on

  • Get access to 16,000 woodworking plans, Download 50 FREE Plans... ➤➤ http://ishbv.com/tedsplans/pdf
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Want to preview some of our plans? You can get 50 Woodworking Plans and a 440-Page "The Art of Woodworking" Book... Absolutely FREE ▲▲▲ http://tinyurl.com/yy9yh8fu
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Hello there! Get Your Professional Job-Winning Resume Here! http://bit.ly/topresum
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here

Character Design

  1. 1. Designing a Video Game Character
  2. 2. Goals of Character Design• Enhance story• Emotional response• Characters to identify with and care about• Credible within the game style• Create characters that people can: – Find intriguing (even if a villain) – Can believe in – Can identify with• Distinctive enough to be memorable
  3. 3. Avatars• Player-designed• Flexibility differs by genre –Role-playing games usually the best at this –Race, gender, hair, physical attributes, etc.• Typically no personality at first and is given by the player.• Goal is tools for players to create themselves
  4. 4. Non Specific Avatar• Designer doesn’t specify anything.• Allows very tight connection between player and avatar – Dead Space’s Isaac Clarke• Limiting for designer
  5. 5. Specific Avatar• Goals• Personality of their own• Belong in the game• Player’s relationship more complex – Identify with, not become
  6. 6. Semi Specific Avatar• Only partially characterised• Better to make cartoonish• Common with action game avatars – Mario
  7. 7. Control Mechanisms• Indirect (“point and click”) – Doesn’t steer avatar, points to where to go. Player as disembodied guide friend – More likely specific avatar• Direct – Player steers avatar through game world, doing a variety of actions as necessary – More likely nonspecific or semi-specific
  8. 8. Designing the Avatar• Nonspecific, semi-specific or specific – Visual, psychological, social• Direct or indirect control• Goal: character the player can identify with qualities they can appreciate
  9. 9. Character Physical Types• Humanoids• Non-humanoids• Hybrids
  10. 10. Defining Attributes• Clothing, weapons, symbolic objects, name.• Colour palette reflects character’s attitudes or emotional temperament. – Superman, upholder of “truth, justice, and the American way”: bright/cheery, American flag – Batman, Dark Knight of Gotham City (grittier, more run-down than Metropolis): somber
  11. 11. Side Kicks• Most prominent common element in game design• Combine qualities (e.g. tough with cute) to provide variety and comic relief• Benefits: – Give player additional moves and actions. – Extend emotional range of game. – Can give player information they couldn’t get otherwise.
  12. 12. Believable Characters• Major characters need rich personalities – Where was he/she born? – What are his/her favourite activities? – What were his/her biggest triumphs in life? – What are his/her interesting or important possessions?• Attributes – location, health, relationships, etc – Can change as the player plays the game
  13. 13. Believable Characters• Three golden guidelines to developing effective, believable characters – Needs to intrigue the player – Needs to get the player to like him – Needs to change and grow according to experience
  14. 14. Character Archetypes• Hero – Outer problem is aim of game • Shape shifter – Inner problem is flaw or dark • Form changer secret •Threshold guardian • Progress delayer• Mentor – Guide character •Trickster • Mischief maker• Higher self •Shadow – Hero as he aspires to be • Ultimate evil• Ally •Herald – Meant to aid the hero • Used to facilitate change in the story
  15. 15. • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FQ7YT8Aj r0c&feature=related

×