Learning for the win

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2012 GEC presentation

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  • The video, which is not present there as it can't be linked from the GEC, is the Extra Credits video on Gamifying Education, which can be found at http://www.penny-arcade.com/patv/episode/gamifying-education
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Learning for the win

  1. 1. Presenter:Caryn Swarkswarkc@holyspirit.ab.ca Transforming Your Classroom With Games Based Learning Image by Moroboshi on Wikimedia, lisenced under Creative Commons
  2. 2. What Games Do You Play?
  3. 3. 1. What is gamification and why use it?2. What does a gamified classroom looklike?3. How can I create a gamified system?4. What are some other applications ofgames based learning?5. Where do I go from here?
  4. 4. Image by Peng on Wikimedia, lisenced under Creative Commons
  5. 5. The use of gamemechanics and gamedesign techniques in anon game situation.You do NOT have to bea “gamer” to usegamification!
  6. 6. Video:
  7. 7.  Memorize information  Use information Reiterate facts  Interpret and analyze Learn set topics  Explore diverse topics Seat work  Group work Lecture format  Self-motivation Accept teachings  Question information Do things the “right”  Try new ways of doing way things Old ways of educating The 21st Century Learner Objectives
  8. 8. Lessons from Daniel Pink’s Drive:
  9. 9. Lessons from Daniel Pink’s Drive:-People are driven by mastery, autonomy, andpurpose
  10. 10. Lessons from Daniel Pink’s Drive:-People are driven by mastery, autonomy, andpurpose-Overemphasis on extrinsic rewards can backfire
  11. 11. Lessons from Daniel Pink’s Drive:-People are driven by mastery, autonomy, andpurpose-Overemphasis on extrinsic rewards can backfire-Motivation comes from a state of flow:becoming so immersed in something that youlose all track of time
  12. 12. Lessons from Daniel Pink’s Drive:-People are driven by mastery, autonomy, andpurpose-Overemphasis on extrinsic rewards can backfire-Motivation comes from a state of flow:becoming so immersed in something that youlose all track of time*These factors appear naturally in games,making games based systems an excellent optionfor the 21st century learner!*
  13. 13. • Every gamified system looks different• Meaningful gamification has to be about more than pointsification (just using the trappings of games to “trick” learners)• Involves choice, freedom, and fun• Seeks to activate prior positive associations with games to encourage student participation and enjoyment
  14. 14. One example of gamification
  15. 15. Students begin the year as traineesin the kingdom of Cognosco. As theyear progresses, King Ion VI iskidnapped by King Nocens from theneighboring kingdom of Ignarus.Students must try to save the king.There are several major eventsthroughout the year:• The king’s kidnapping• Entering into Ignarus• Storming the castleIn between, students earnexperience points (XP) and “levelup” to become stronger warriors inpreparation for the final battle.
  16. 16. Students begin the year as level one avatars. They design their own characters. Each time a student levels up, they get a gold coin for the classroom store and a piece to add to their avatars (extrinsic motivators). Students choose between male and female avatars and name them as well as creating a back story for them. As with any game, levelling is easy at first, but becomes harder as time goes on.Starting avatar Fully levelled avatar
  17. 17. At the beginning of the year,students choose whether theywant to be rogues, fighters, ormages (I use this as a jumpingoff point for a story writingintroduction).Every five levels, students earna skill based on their choice.
  18. 18. Experience Points help students level up. They can be gained by: • Completing bonus quests • Completing assignments • Winning them in Cognoscopoly Skill points are also experience points. They correspond to a student’s grade in a subject. They can be gained by: • Completing exams or assignmentsIn many gamified classrooms, XP = grade. Skill points are my way of addressinghow to calculate experience in a multi-subject setting.
  19. 19. At the beginning of the year,students choose secret avatarnames known only to me. Everyweek, I post a leaderboard withthe current XP under thosenames.Students can choose whether ornot to publicly display avatars,so the experience is as public orprivate as they choose to makeit.
  20. 20. Students also have the ability toearn achievements, or onlinebadges awarded via For AllBadges and Edmodo.Achievements are optional anddo not earn additional XP.Pictured:Jack of All Trades: Join 4 ormore school clubsExpert: Reach level 15Sesquipedalian: Hand in anassignment with every wordspelled correctlyReporter: Make 10 posts to ourclass Wiki
  21. 21. Cognoscopoly is a full sizeMonopoly board. On Fridays,students who completed allhomework on time for theentire week get to roll andmove their piece.Traditional Monopoly locationshave been replaced with placeslike “Stables” and “townsquare.”Students collect 200 XP forpassing go. They can also earn150 XP for solving a brainteaserif they land on Oracle’s Quest.Landing on Treasure Chest earnsthem a small prize (eg: 100 XP,sit anywhere for a day, 15 minsof free computer time)
  22. 22. James Gee discusses how thebest games have affinity spaces– a culture surrounding them. Toencourage this, we also have:• A collectible trading card game• Language consistent with the game’s premise (eg: When we do layered curriculums, the layers are called hunting, crafting, questing, and boss fight)• Medieval classroom decorations• Students are encouraged to write “fanfiction” about the kingdom of Cognosco
  23. 23. Notes:*Results from one year only*Have made changes to the avatars based on student feedback
  24. 24. Clipart from Discovery Education; created by Mark A Hicks
  25. 25. Games require rules. Yours can be as simple as laying out how you earn points and what the goal of the game is. Players should also know the “win state”: how they will know when they have achieved their goals.Image by Greg McMillan on Flickr, licensed under Creative Commons
  26. 26. An important part of scoring is the leaderboard, or public posting of scores. This should be done as soon as possible (meaning you need to stay up to date with your marking!), but it can be anonymous as well.Image by spcbrass on Flickr, licensed under Creative Commons
  27. 27. Games should have some element of chance. This can take the form of… • Rolling dice to see in what order presentations occur • Offering “surprise prizes” (eg: when all students reach level five, there is a prize no one knew about) • Flipping a coin to decide between two due datesImage by 8one6 on Flickr, licensed under Creative Commons
  28. 28.  Start Small! It’s overwhelming to do it all at once  A good way to start small: begin with a simple shift in perspective, encouraging students to view themselves as having zero points and gaining more rather than having 100 points and losing them as they make mistakes. Clipart from Discovery Education; created by Mark A Hicks
  29. 29.  Choose a setting Start by choosing a setting or theme for your game  Most common settings are fantasy or sci fi, but you can adapt them to your class. For example, if teaching a history class, it only makes sense to set your game in a historical context! Clipart from Discovery Education; created by Mark A Hicks
  30. 30.  Lookfor simple ways to gamify what you’re already doing  InThe Multiplayer Classroom, Lee Sheldon relates the story of a high school biology teacher who uses the classroom skeleton and pet turtle as key NPCs (non player characters), making them “quest givers.” Clipart from Discovery Education; created by Mark A Hicks
  31. 31.  Decide how involved you want to get  If you’re feeling unsure, you may want to keep things simple: not worry about having a storyline and simply focus on integrating some gaming terminology. If you’re more comfortable, by all means create a story your “players” can get involved in. Clipart from Discovery Education; created by Mark A Hicks
  32. 32. Clipart from Discovery Education; created by Mark A Hicks
  33. 33. A few examples of ways to learn with games Image by JacobMetcalf on Flickr, licensed under Creative Commons
  34. 34. FOR…• Math/Language Arts: • Scribblenauts (Nintendo DS, iPad) • Professor Layton and the Curious Village (Nintendo DS) • Science: • Portal (Xbox, PC) • Social Studies: • Sim City (most systems) • Civilization (most systems)• Phys Ed: • Anything with the Wii or • Xbox Kinect
  35. 35. • Gamestar Mechanic: www.gamestarmechanic.com• Brain Pop: www.brainpop.com• Games for Change: www.gamesforchange.org• Nobel Prize Educational Games: www.nobelprize.org/educational• Darfur is Dying: www.darfurisdying.comThere are lots of great educational games online – these are just afew!
  36. 36. Clipart from Discovery Education; created by Mark A Hicks
  37. 37. Books and websites on games based learning and gamification
  38. 38. 1. My blog: www.gamifymyclass.blogspot.ca2. Mozilla Open Badges: www.openbadges.org3. Games MOOC: www.gamesmooc.shivtr.com4. Coursera’s Gamification Course: www.coursera.org (search for gamification)5. Kill Screen Daily: www.killscreendaily.com6. Deep Fun: www.deepfun.com7. Twitter: www.twitter.com Use hashtags: -gbl (games based learning) -gamesmooc (games mooc) -edapps (educational apps)
  39. 39. Lee SheldonThe Multiplayer Classroom Karl M. Kapp The Gamification of Learning and Instruction James Paul Gee What Video Games Have to Teach Us About Learning and Literacy
  40. 40. Caryn Swarkswarkc@holyspirit.ab.cawww.gamifymyclass.blogspot.ca

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