The Play’s the Thing <ul><li>Drama may be the oldest form of true literature, and may be the first type of literature cons...
Greek Influences <ul><li>Drama  = “to do” or “to act” in Greek </li></ul><ul><li>Tragoidia  = “songs sung by goat men” or ...
Aristotle on Tragedy <ul><li>Aristotle was the first to attempt to define, in a serious and methodical way, the elements o...
Structure <ul><li>Tragedy must follow the unity of space, time, and action (the  three unities ). </li></ul><ul><li>Comple...
On  Oedipus <ul><li>He considered  Oedipus Rex  the greatest play ever written—nothing really new or significant was added...
Post-Aristotle <ul><li>The Romans, heavily influenced by the Greeks, made no real significant changes to drama. </li></ul>...
Modern and Post-Modern Drama <ul><li>The greatest modern playwrights (Chekhov, Ibsen, Shaw, etc.) generally maintain the t...
General Concepts <ul><li>Dramas are primarily meant to be performed, so actors or directors will bring unique perspectives...
<ul><li>For literary analysis, the dialogue is the primary text—what people say is revealing. However, we must also look c...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Drama overview 2 study

569 views

Published on

school work

Published in: Education, Spiritual
0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
569
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
12
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Drama overview 2 study

  1. 1. The Play’s the Thing <ul><li>Drama may be the oldest form of true literature, and may be the first type of literature consistently written down and widely copied. </li></ul><ul><li>Drama probably grew out of some form of pagan worship, fertility rites, or other rituals that acted out the work of the gods. </li></ul><ul><li>Plays were originally highly affected, with actors in masks, use of broad gestures, etc. The words had to do the work of getting audiences to accept the situation. </li></ul><ul><li>As theater developed, audiences came to prefer verisimilitude , or a closeness to reality. </li></ul>
  2. 2. Greek Influences <ul><li>Drama = “to do” or “to act” in Greek </li></ul><ul><li>Tragoidia = “songs sung by goat men” or “he-goat sacrifice song,” refers to cult of Dionysus </li></ul><ul><li>Legend has Greek tragedy beginning in Athens ca. 530 BCE by Thespis </li></ul><ul><li>Melpomene is the muse of tragedy, often depicted holding the tragic mask. Thalia is the muse of comedy and thus holds the comic mask. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Aristotle on Tragedy <ul><li>Aristotle was the first to attempt to define, in a serious and methodical way, the elements of literature, which for him was “poetry.” </li></ul><ul><li>Poetry could be divided into comedy, tragedy, and epic. Our understanding of drama derives from these categories. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Structure <ul><li>Tragedy must follow the unity of space, time, and action (the three unities ). </li></ul><ul><li>Complex plots have peripeteia (reversal of situation)—there’s nothing more tragic than someone high-born being brought low; and discovery —the main character learns significant knowledge or recognizes something important. </li></ul><ul><li>Audiences, by going through trials with characters, emotionally purge themselves ( catharsis ). Thus, we metaphysically experience everything the character does. </li></ul>
  5. 5. On Oedipus <ul><li>He considered Oedipus Rex the greatest play ever written—nothing really new or significant was added to drama after this point, just variations on the theme. </li></ul><ul><li>Oedipus has been widely accepted as the greatest tragedy of the ancient world, and is certainly the most influential. Many of its themes and ideas are imbedded in all of literature and film to this day. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Post-Aristotle <ul><li>The Romans, heavily influenced by the Greeks, made no real significant changes to drama. </li></ul><ul><li>The introduction of Christianity to the West introduced new stories, themes, and a morality which often dictated what could not be portrayed. </li></ul><ul><li>Most medieval plays involved religious themes and were highly allegorical (e.g., Everyman ). </li></ul><ul><li>Drama retained much of the structure, and a general adherence to the unities, until Shakespeare. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Modern and Post-Modern Drama <ul><li>The greatest modern playwrights (Chekhov, Ibsen, Shaw, etc.) generally maintain the three unities. </li></ul><ul><li>Plays became more experimental in form after 1900, with playwrights such as Durrenmatt, Pirandello, Beckett, and Brecht using minimalism, surrealism, magical realism, etc., to affect audiences and create a new experience and offer commentary. </li></ul>
  8. 8. General Concepts <ul><li>Dramas are primarily meant to be performed, so actors or directors will bring unique perspectives to a work—you will probably never see the same play twice. </li></ul><ul><li>Plays often use fairly overt symbols, and do so sparingly. E.g., Trifles will use the image of a caged bird repeatedly. </li></ul><ul><li>Since this is a visual medium, setting and props may help develop characters as well as themes (e.g., the gun on the wall in Hedda Gabler foreshadows the way she will die). </li></ul>
  9. 9. <ul><li>For literary analysis, the dialogue is the primary text—what people say is revealing. However, we must also look closely at the actions, as their speech may be deceptive, or they may be ignorant of information. We must also look at how others react to them. </li></ul><ul><li>Stage directions can be helpful, although directors usually feel free to ignore them. An author's vision is not often the primary concern. </li></ul>

×