DGS
E-magazine
DGS
Hi and welcome to our new edition of DGS E-magazine.
We have had a busy start to the new school year with lots
going o...
Meet our Winner:
Michael McPhillips, 3C3
Our Runners-Up

Eilidh Stevenson, 4C2
Cameron Miller, 5C1

Euan Napier, 3C1
Head Boy
We find out how Connor McLennan is getting on in his role as Head Boy

Do you feel you will do a good job as Head...
Head Girl
We find out how Caitlin McArthur is getting on in his role as Head Girl.

Do you feel you will do a good job as ...
Deputy

Head Boys

We catch up with Connal McLeod and Matt McPhillips.
Why did you want to be a Depute Head
Boy?
We wanted...
Deputy

Head Girls

We catch up with Keira Bain and Jenny Macmillan.

Do you feel you will do a good job as Depute
Head Gi...
We hear from our lovely writer, Delilah Fawcett who is spending her
sixth year in Germany. She tells us how she is settlin...
New Review

A Slice of Pi
We find out more about the recent ‘Raspberry Pi,’ a revolutionary credit-card sized computer.

B...
Why not try making our delicious new recipe this October holiday?

Bakewell Tart
Equipment:
Scales
Baking Bowl
Spatula
Bak...
4.

Bind the dough using two to three tablespoons of cold water.

5.

Roll it out onto a lightly floured surface before pu...
ndomondo
The new app to help you keep track of your progress in your favourite sport.

If you like activities such as runn...
New Review

Windows 8 Review
By Douglas Henderson
Windows is one of the most popular operating
systems today. Of these ope...
AWARDS EVENING

The Awards Ceremony is of gigantic importance. Perhaps not to everyone. But the number of people who care ...
Well done to everyone who received an award or helped to organise our fantastic Awards Ceremony.
Origami
Welcome to our 'spooky' edition of origami corner, where we will be showing you
how to make your very own blood-su...
Step 4:
Fold the uppermost layer on the left over
and then turn over the paper.

Step 5:
Fold the uppermost layer on the l...
HOUSE CAPTAINS
Dunbar Grammar School has five houses: Winterfield, Victoria, Cromwell,
Castle and Lauderdale.
Each year, h...
HOUSE CAPTAINS
Winterfield’s new House Captains: Cameron Miller and
Erin Mitchell
Winterfield’s new Vice Captains: Jade Fa...
HOUSE CAPTAINS
Victoria’s new House Captains: James Duguid and
Emma McLean
Victoria’s new Vice Captains: Robyn Clift and
M...
HOUSE CAPTAINS
Cromwell’s new House Captains: Katie Pritchett
and Hannah Moodie
Cromwell’s new Vice Captains: Rachel Kerr ...
HOUSE CAPTAINS
Castle’s new House Captains: Kyle Laing and
Kaitlyn Baillie
Castle’s new Vice Captains: Ailsa Maguire and
M...
HOUSE CAPTAINS
Lauderdale’s new House Captains: Lottie Hirons and
Emily Wilson-Beales
Winterfield’s new Vice Captains: Ell...
Social Blues
By Joshua Locke

In a radical mood swing from just a few years ago, there seems to be a big rise in happiness...
We Review...

GANSTA GRANNY
Written by David Walliams

*She has white hair
*She has false teeth
*She has used tissues up h...
Mario Galaxy
By 2006, Nintendo was in third place in the battle between them Sony and Microsoft.
The most famous game comp...
This Halloween, read our spooky story...

The Old Lady
and the House
By Najifa Rashid

I opened my eyes, a black sky greet...
New Teachers
We meet some of our new teachers to find out a little more about them. Look out for
more in our next edition!...
New Teachers

Miss Swan
What do you teach?
I teach Modern Studies and Social
Subjects.
Why did you decide to become a teac...
New Film Review

This Month, we review...

Two of Us
By Chris O’Brien
The two of us is a film depicting the last day that ...
OUR TEAM...
Freya Willens
Holly Szczypka
Joshua Locke
Tya Willens
Delilah Fawcett
Lottie Hirons
Emily Wilson-Beales
Jon Pe...
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Dunbar Grammar School's Autumn Magazine 2013

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Our Autumn 2013 edition of the school magazine. It contains features, reviews, a recipe, interviews, creative writing, origami and much more!

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Dunbar Grammar School's Autumn Magazine 2013

  1. 1. DGS E-magazine
  2. 2. DGS Hi and welcome to our new edition of DGS E-magazine. We have had a busy start to the new school year with lots going on in and around the school. We hope you enjoy reading about some of them here. In this issue, we catch up with our House Captains and Head Boy/Girl team. We also hear from some of our new teachers and Delilah who is studying in Germany this year. Try reading our spooky Halloween stories (if you dare!) and have a go at making our latest recipe or oragami. Check out our new app, book and film reviews too. If you are interested in getting involved, please speak to Mrs Reid in the English department or come along to G19 on a Thursday lunchtime. We always love to have new writers, photographers or people interested in layout and design. Well done to everyone on the team for all their hard work and as always, thank you to Mrs Reid for her brilliant help and support. See you soon with our next edition! DGS E-MAGAZINE TEAM
  3. 3. Meet our Winner: Michael McPhillips, 3C3
  4. 4. Our Runners-Up Eilidh Stevenson, 4C2 Cameron Miller, 5C1 Euan Napier, 3C1
  5. 5. Head Boy We find out how Connor McLennan is getting on in his role as Head Boy Do you feel you will do a good job as Head Boy, and why? Yes, I will do a good job as Head Boy. I am determined and I will use team work to get the job done no matter the difficulty. What type of work do you do as Head Boy? Arranging things as parents’ nights and pupil council meetings, Most of all, my job is to encourage pupils to have the best possible time at Dunbar Grammar School. What do you hope to achieve in this role? I hope to achieve a better understanding of the experience at DGS. Hopefully I’ll also improve my skills set for the future. What’s been your biggest challenge so far? Getting to know all the students and having a more active role in the school. What do you like about DGS? It has a very welcoming feel and gives you the best time at high school as possible. What’s been your favourite memory so far? Working with my great team of Deputes and the Head Girl and getting to know all the students at DGS.
  6. 6. Head Girl We find out how Caitlin McArthur is getting on in his role as Head Girl. Do you feel you will do a good job as Head Girl? And why? Yes - because I've got a lot of good ideas! But also, as a student I know what students want and can make a good choice. And being myself is hopefully good enough. What type of work do you do? I organise a lot of stuff which is great. I just make the link between teachers and students every week. What do you hope to achieve in this role? Many things. I really want to make sure every student is happy! What's been your biggest challenge so far? Apart from trying to speak slowly, my main challenge was the Awards Evening. What do you like most about DGS? The students and teachers plus the atmosphere is great! What’s been your favourite memory so far? Finding out that I was going to be Head Girl!
  7. 7. Deputy Head Boys We catch up with Connal McLeod and Matt McPhillips. Why did you want to be a Depute Head Boy? We wanted to contribute to the growth of the school, socially and academically. What type of work do you do? We both organise lots of events, get people involved in Committees and listen to the views of students. What do you hope to achieve in this role? We want to leave a legacy and have a successfully organised year! We also want to help the Head Boy and Girl, Connor and Caitlin. What's been your biggest challenge so far? Organising fundraisers. What do you like most about DGS? The nice atmosphere and the friendly approachable 6th years. What’s been your favourite memory so far? Matt: Winning the Under 16s Rugby Cup Connal: The Battlefields trip and Christmas Dances.
  8. 8. Deputy Head Girls We catch up with Keira Bain and Jenny Macmillan. Do you feel you will do a good job as Depute Head Girl? And why? Yes, we’re organising prom and the year book so it allows us to use our opinions as well as getting the opinions of others. What type of work do you do? We organise committees and make sure everyone does their duties and we also help the Head Boy and Girl. What do you hope to achieve in this role? To have a successful prom and good year book and hoodies. To be a good role model and to help the lower years. What's been your biggest challenge so far? Encouraging people to do their duties and the fundraisers. What do you like most about DGS? The people and the extra curricular activities. What’s been your favourite memory so far? The Battlefields and Geography trips as well as sports day and the Christmas dances. Interviews by Najifa Rashid, Ellie Combe, Sarah Logan and Carina Hodgson
  9. 9. We hear from our lovely writer, Delilah Fawcett who is spending her sixth year in Germany. She tells us how she is settling in and what it is like living in a whole new culture and language. Dunbar’s Leipzig Leipzig: the city of revolution, of beauty, of culture. The city that will hold a part of me for the rest of my life. The city that has taken hold of me and has welcomed me into its midst. Leipzig is the city where I will learn to speak German. And it has already started. After the summer holidays, I arrived in Leipzig eager to try out the German I already knew from my years of verbs and dictionaries and translations. I stuttered my way through my first week, perfecting phrases such as ‘I’m from Scotland’ and ‘Can you say that again, please?’ School life overwhelmed me and the beautiful phrases I had learnt in Higher German ran to hide somewhere behind my nervousness but I took courage from the fact that it was my first week. I was the ‘New Girl’ for the first time in my life and I expected it to be the hardest change of my life so far. I’ve now been here for about a month. I can follow some conversations and find my way to all of my classes without getting lost! The classes are 45 minutes long but are organised in double periods. This means an hour and a half of listening to a teacher talk in a different language. In all honesty, I find this near on impossible. For this reason, I often allow my mind to wander during class and if any of you readers hopes to move to another country soon, I very much advise such brain breaks as a vital part of the learning curve. Outside of school, I am getting along much better than I expected. My first host family is nicer than I could ever have wished for. They are patient as I stumble across complicated (and often simple) sentences and they are always ready to offer words when my vocabulary fails me. I feel very much at ease among them and the time that I spend with them seems to fly past. We’ll catch up with Delilah again in our next issue to see how she is getting on.
  10. 10. New Review A Slice of Pi We find out more about the recent ‘Raspberry Pi,’ a revolutionary credit-card sized computer. By Douglas Henderson In February of 2012, anyone who knew anything about computers was talking non-stop about the “Raspberry Pi”, a revolutionary credit-card sized computer. The most shocking part of this new computing idea was that it would cost the buyer only £15. Of course, this is ridiculously cheap, and when all’s considered, this is a ready-made computer; all you need to make it work is a keyboard, screen, power source, mouse and an SD card. All of the “peripherals” (as these extra items are called) can be purchased cheaply, meaning it could be affordable to even those who are less well-off. So, the Pi is a revolutionary computer. However, its appeal doesn’t stop there. The Pi was built by the designer to get more kids interested in computer programming. To many, programming is a daunting prospect due to the worry the computer could be broken. In addition to this, many children are completely unaware that programming is what runs a computer. To most, all people see in a computer is a pleasant, picture-based operating system. Microsoft Windows for example. In reality, the computer runs on millions of strings of ones and zeros, known as binary, which to humans looks like complete gobble-de-gook! Luckily, the Pi’s designer, Eben Upton, doesn’t expect people to code in binary! The Pi allows people to get used to coding in a safe, worry free environment. As all of the Pi’s data is held on an SD card, if the Linux-based operating system (the Pi’s equivalent of Windows) is damaged, a new SD card can be made, and the Pi will run again. The Raspberry Pi opens up straight into a “Command Prompt”. This will be new to many, but this is the original form of computing. In the 60’s, computer users were typing into a basic interface provided by the computer. There were no desktop, no icons, and no visible menus. The Pi means people are re-exposed back into this, for example, having to type “startx” to open the “Graphical User Interface”; the image-based interface we all will have experienced. Once in there, the user can access the internet, edit basic text documents, and many other normal computer functions. There is one main difference however: there is a heavy emphasis on programming. There are several coding languages pre-installed, such as “Python” and a more basic language “Scratch”. Scratch is especially popular with younger coders, as it is heavily imaged based: a “sprite” (a picture which can have code written for it) can easily be made to move across the screen, or speak. This is what the Pi foundation wants. Younger people enjoying and learning code. I would like to say I am one of those young people. My Raspberry Pi and I have done many great things in Python code. Quite frankly, many think programming’s not the most exciting hobby, but when I write a code and run it, my heart is always racing. With some basic understanding, the possibilities are unlimited. I’m sure Eben Upton would agree with me when I say just try it. You can find many languages based online, such as “Codecademy”, a beginner’s step-by step guide to many languages. If it’s not for you, no problem. But if you enjoy it, you’re only just getting started!
  11. 11. Why not try making our delicious new recipe this October holiday? Bakewell Tart Equipment: Scales Baking Bowl Spatula Baking Tray Wooden Spoon or Electric Mixer Ingredients Ingredients for the pastry: for the sponge: 175g (6oz) Plain Flour 85g (3oz) Hard butter, diced 4tbsp Jam for on top Method: 1. Preheat the oven to 180 °C/Fan 160°C/ gas 4. 2. To make the pastry, start by measuring 175g (6oz) of plain flour and 85g (3oz) of hard diced butter into the bowl. 3. Use your fingers to rub in the butter until the mixture resembles fine bread crumbs. 115g (4oz) Soft butter 115g (4oz) Caster Sugar 175g (6oz) Self –Raising Flour 1 tsp of Baking Powder 2 large Eggs 2 tbsp Milk ½ tsp of Almond Extract By Tya Willens
  12. 12. 4. Bind the dough using two to three tablespoons of cold water. 5. Roll it out onto a lightly floured surface before putting it in the tin and covering with jam 6. To make the sponge, measure out 115g of soft butter, 115g of caster sugar, 175g of self-raising flour, 1 level tsp. of baking powder, 2 large eggs, 2 tbsp. of milk and 1/2 tsp. of almond extract and put into your bowl. 7. Mix for two minutes until well blended. 8. Transfer the mixture into the tin spreading evenly on top of the jam and sprinkle some almonds on top. 9. 10. Bake for 25 minutes or until the cake has shrunk from the sides from the tin and springs back. Cut into about 20 pieces and enjoy! By Tya Willens
  13. 13. ndomondo The new app to help you keep track of your progress in your favourite sport. If you like activities such as running, jogging cycling or just about any other sport from kayaking to dancing then you should consider downloading Endomondo Sports Tracker for Android and Apple devices. This app does what it says: tracks progress in sporting activities. But the way it does it sets it completely aside from any other sports trackers I have tried. With many features it really makes for a great way to keep progress. The Test: To test this app, I went on a cycle. After choosing leisure cycling from the list of sports (race cycling was also available), I pressed start and went off. After one mile of cycling I heard a voice coming from my phone (which slightly startled me) telling me that I had done 1 mile, the time it took to do the mile and the average time per mile. Endomondo continued to do this every mile which I found to be extremely useful as it allowed me to track my progress without stopping to check my phone. Another useful feature I found was that the app would tell me if there were any problems. What I mean by this is about halfway through the cycle, I heard my phone say “Stop. GPS lost”. Had this warning not gone off, the rest of the trip would have gone untracked but I knew that because of the warning, I had to pull over and fix the GPS connection to continue tracking. Upon getting the connection back I was alerted that it was safe to continue. The Result: Once I had reached home again, I stopped the tracker and looked at the results page. It gave a very neat overview of the statistics e.g. the length of the trip, max speed, average speed and many more. It also gave a map view of the route I had taken. Putting the results all in one place was very sensible and made it a lot easier to understand how well I had done. This app is brilliant! The number of features is just unreal. Downloading it is just a no-brainer. By Jon Petrusev
  14. 14. New Review Windows 8 Review By Douglas Henderson Windows is one of the most popular operating systems today. Of these operating systems, Windows 7 was one of Microsoft’s most popular operating systems, a huge step up from the (quite frankly) hated Vista. Remarkably quick and with a slightly altered style, Windows 7 hit it big. Everyone was extremely excited when Windows announced the release of their next operating system: Windows 8. However, when it was released in 2012, many’s excitement changed to shock and disappointment. Windows 8 was completely different from 7, and pretty much all other Windows versions. The standard desktop-operated system had been replaced by a tiled “Start” page, from which you had to select the desktop. People don’t like change. Windows 8, with its completely new format attracted a storm of bad reviews and shout-downs. All in all, it got a very bad press for the first few months after its release. I had my first taste of Windows 8 in my computing class, when the teacher, Mr Tennant, brought in his laptop with 8 loaded on it. I was, I must say, already expecting it to be very bad, due to the bad reviews I had read online. As I expected, I disliked it to begin with, simply because I couldn’t understand the interface. I was left with poor impressions, and didn’t use it again until a year later, when we got a new laptop, with Windows 8 installed. Crucially, this laptop had a touch screen. I sat down and had a look, and was shocked at how good the interface was. Windows 8 was made for touch. The start page is able to be slid at the swipe of a finger, icons are easily selected, and unlocking the laptop is a joy (a slide upwards, moving a lock screen to reveal the login). Best of all, the improved system boots up in under a minute, a fresh feature after my PC’s slow Vista load. The Windows Store containing apps of all types, gives users a more exciting experience, and is very easy to use. The desktop, however, lacks the BFB (Big Friendly Button) seen on every other release, which means no start menu! This, I must confess, is extremely annoying. However, the multitude of points in its favour well make up for it. Another big bonus is the Office 2013 package we got with Windows. Although very similar to Office 2010, they have created an online cloud system, very similar to Google’s Docs. This allows a user to access their document on a completely separate machine. No more “I forgot to print it off” homework excuses then! On the whole, I loved Windows 8’s fresh new style and innovate touch-screen compatible layout. I would recommend it to anyone considering buying a new computer or upgrading an old one, as quite simply it is Window’s best operating system so far.
  15. 15. AWARDS EVENING The Awards Ceremony is of gigantic importance. Perhaps not to everyone. But the number of people who care is not important. What is important is the personal achievement. To the people who were selected: one of your teachers saw your ability; they saw your understanding; you were noticed for your knowledge. That matters. Being noticed for your ability is arguably the most important thing a school can do. This is an important feature of Dunbar Grammar School. Not only is it a school of ambition and hard work, but it loves any opportunity to recognise achievement.
  16. 16. Well done to everyone who received an award or helped to organise our fantastic Awards Ceremony.
  17. 17. Origami Welcome to our 'spooky' edition of origami corner, where we will be showing you how to make your very own blood-sucking bat. Step 1: Start off with a triangular base. To make the triangular base, place the square paper with the colour/pattern-side facing up. Next make creases vertically and horizontally across the paper. Turn the paper over and make creases along the diagonals of the paper. Step 2: Bring the (horizontal) creases to meet the (bottom vertical) centre to collapse the square into the triangular base. Step 3: Once you have got the triangular base, cut a slit through the 2 layers on the left side of the triangle. This will later form the head of the bat. Then fold the uppermost corner on the right down.
  18. 18. Step 4: Fold the uppermost layer on the left over and then turn over the paper. Step 5: Fold the uppermost layer on the left down (same as what you did on the right). Step 6: Then fold this over to make the front body of the bat. Step 7: Fold down the top, which you created in Step 2, to form the head of the bat. Step 8: Finally, fold the corners of the head slightly inwards to make the ears of the bat. Here you have your very own scary bat! If you want, you can make small holes in the back of the bat, and join some together with string.
  19. 19. HOUSE CAPTAINS Dunbar Grammar School has five houses: Winterfield, Victoria, Cromwell, Castle and Lauderdale. Each year, house captains are appointed to represent their house, organise new events and competitions, and getting everyone involved! Dunbar Grammar School Houses have been a tradition for a long time. At the end of the year the house with the most points win a prize. The last prize was a trip to the zoo. You can earn points through positive referrals, sports, charity activities and challenges throughout the year. If you have an idea of how you could earn some more points then speak to your house captain or leave a note in the ideas folder on your house notice board (along the P.E. corridor.) Remember the more points you earn, the more chances you have of winning that prize! In this issue, we catch up with all the new house captains to find out a bit more about them and see how they are getting on in their new role... By Ellie Combe and Sarah Logan
  20. 20. HOUSE CAPTAINS Winterfield’s new House Captains: Cameron Miller and Erin Mitchell Winterfield’s new Vice Captains: Jade Fairbairn and Adrien Brady Why did you want to become House Captain? Jade: I enjoy working as a team and I wanted to make sure that everyone gets involved so Winterfield will win this year! What inspired you to become House Captain? Cameron: The agonising second place that Winterfield came last year gave me a lot of drive to try and change things. How can you help your house to win this year? Jade: We can try to get EVERYONE involved and build up everybody’s confidence, to help us do well. If you could choose another house to be in, which one would you choose and why? Cameron: I would never choose another house. My loyalty lies in Winterfield! What activities/house competitions do you want to include in the future? Poems, writing, reading, drama, art, music, cooking and competitions which include team work. If you were asked to create your own house what would it be called and why? Cameron: ‘Team Panda’ because we would always be going to the zoo. Favourite movie of all time? Jade: Hard choice… but I’d say P.S. I Love You or the Impossible You are very clearly brilliant. What makes you so awesome? Cameron: I wouldn’t say that, but I am proud of my achievements.
  21. 21. HOUSE CAPTAINS Victoria’s new House Captains: James Duguid and Emma McLean Victoria’s new Vice Captains: Robyn Clift and Matthew Galloway Victoria’s House Captains and Vice Captains were unavailable for comment. So, we decided to ask our lovely Victoria pupils their views instead. What do you like most about being part of Victoria? Emma: I enjoy being part of Victoria because we are a house with spirit even though we don’t win that often. Alex and Claire: On dress down days we get to wear blue and we think that is the nicest house colour. What do you hope your House Captains and Vice Captains will do for your house? Moray: I hope they will come up with new point winning ideas! Emma: I hope they will lead our house and represent us appropriately as well as making house competitions to get us more house points. How are you going to make sure that you’re the winning house at the end of the year? Alex and Claire: By working well as a team. Emma: By earning as many points as we can!
  22. 22. HOUSE CAPTAINS Cromwell’s new House Captains: Katie Pritchett and Hannah Moodie Cromwell’s new Vice Captains: Rachel Kerr and Alannah Ramsay Why did you want to become House Captain? Katie: I wanted to get more involved in the house system and help Cromwell to win again this year! What inspired you to become House Captain? Rachel: Cromwell has done so well winning over the last two years. I wanted to play my part in helping Cromwell to continue this. How can you help your house to win this year? Hannah: We are going to work really hard to organise some great events and find new ways to get everyone in Cromwell involved. We have a new Twitter page where we tweet regular updates and reminders. Check it out if you’re in Cromwell. If you could choose another house to be in, which one would you choose and why? Katie: Winterfield because they seem to be a very competitive house. What activities/house competitions do you want to include in the future? Alannah: We want to include more writing, photography, music and baking competitions as well as lots more sporting events. If you were asked to create your own house what would it be called and why? We would all call it ‘Hakuna Matata.’ What a wonderful phrase! Favourite movie of all time? Rachel: I would have to say the Lion King after the last question. You are very clearly brilliant. What makes you so awesome? Hannah: Thank you! That’s very kind of you. Maybe it’s just a Cromwell thing...
  23. 23. HOUSE CAPTAINS Castle’s new House Captains: Kyle Laing and Kaitlyn Baillie Castle’s new Vice Captains: Ailsa Maguire and Margaux Simmons Why did you want to become House Captain? Margaux: I wanted to win the day out this year so decided that the best way to do this was to become a House Captain myself. What inspired you to become a House Captain? Kaitlyn: Seeing Castle come in last place last year, has inspired us all to encourage our house to do better this year and win! How can you help your house to win this year? Margaux: I hope that by having a positive attitude and encouraging all Castle members to take part in as many activities as possible. If you could choose another house to be in, which one would you choose and why? Margaux: Lauderdale because I have other friends in that house. What activities/house competitions do you want to include in the future? We would love to introduce an eating contest because, you know… who doesn’t love food!? We would also like to introduce more sports events as well as reading competitions. If you were asked to create your own house what would it be called and why? Margaux: I would call it Gryffindor and have a Harry Potter themed houses. Favourite movie of all time? Margaux: Probably Love Actually. It’s such an emotional film! You are very clearly brilliant. What makes you so awesome? Kaitlyn: Thanks! Margaux: The fact that I was chosen to be House Captain, and that I’m ginger and a good laugh.
  24. 24. HOUSE CAPTAINS Lauderdale’s new House Captains: Lottie Hirons and Emily Wilson-Beales Winterfield’s new Vice Captains: Ellen Hamilton and Phoebe Thackray Why did you want to become House Captain? Ellen: I want to get more people motivated to take part and have fun with their house. Emily: We haven’t won in a while so it would be great to hold more events and help Lauderdale to win. How can you help your house to win this year? Phoebe: By drumming up everyone’s team spirit. If you could choose another house to be in, which one would you choose and why? Ellen and Emily: Probably Castle because they are a really competitive and driven house. (I would much rather be in Lauderdale though!) What activities/house competitions do you want to include in the future? Lottie: Introduce a bigger variety of events other than just sport. Get people who are interested in other things such as music, art and cooking involved as well. If you were asked to create your own house what would it be called and why? Ellen: I would call it ’House Party’ because we would get more 4th, 5th and 6th years involved. Favourite movie of all time? Lottie and Ellen: Pitch Perfect is definitely up there. You are very clearly brilliant. What makes you so awesome? Ellen: I guess I was just born with it. Phoebe: Oh thank you! We try our best. Lottie: It’s the hair.
  25. 25. Social Blues By Joshua Locke In a radical mood swing from just a few years ago, there seems to be a big rise in happiness. Why this is can be credited to many things, namely in the complete ignoring of the general state of the world, i.e. the fact that half a million people in the UK rely on food banks, the war on terror is essentially non-existent in the public consciousness and some statistics say that we are naught point six percent better off than we were half a decade ago. Hooray! There is growing sense of happiness in the air. It would be wrong to ignore that and claim that it's a bad or false thing. While it may not affect you nor ever affect you, we are recovering from the economic instabilities from a few years ago. Not to mention the weather's been remarkably sunny and the Olympics not only inspired people, but inspired every kind of person whether they were interested in sports or not. But it would be criminal to ignore the huge problems that are still facing us today. You can debate forever political ideologies, points of view and past decisions made as to why we have all our many problems as a country. But I am wholeheartedly convinced that most problems stem from a lack of unification, and a persistence to try and get things done the way you want them to be done without any attempt to resolve and negotiate. No one helps each other. Pulling together, a necessity during and post world war two and also within communities small or large, has become practically redundant. Like lost and lone scavengers, terrified of what might happen if we don't watch our own back have sold down the river basic qualities that help found our society and democracy, i.e. succour our fellow human beings. While world dilemmas are complex and cannot be dissected and taken apart so easily, fundamentally, at the heart of all problems is the absence of unity. In the best of circumstances the best resolution is that of a compromise, but too often does stubbornness and greed prevail. An affection for a group of people over another group of people, or worse, an affection for materials over people lets violence stir and boil and endure. But we can attain unity, we do it all the time in our daily lives, who's to say it has to stop at just a small kindness. Who's to say it can't grow and eventually, hopefully, dwarf division? While it sounds fantastical and almost completely impossible, internationalism - being able to identify as a planet rather than a fraction of a planet - is a serious and beautiful dream of many. Perhaps in time, we the human race can find harmony. When people will not remember when resources were a dilemma, when war is just a forgotten word and disease is as dead as any past infection made irrelevant by modern medicine. If we can achieve that. Maybe then we can feel a little less insignificant than we really are. Don't ever become egotistical to the extent that you ignore the fact that you are one creature out of billions, on one planet out of trillions. We have the privilege of living and breathing within this universe for just a few decades. Make it worthwhile, and just the be the best human being you can be.
  26. 26. We Review... GANSTA GRANNY Written by David Walliams *She has white hair *She has false teeth *She has used tissues up her sleeve *AND… she’s an international jewel thief! Characters: *Ben *Ben’s parents *Granny *Mr Parker Gangster granny is funny book about a boy named Ben and his rather strange granny. They’re on a secret mission to steal the crown jewels; what will happen? The author of this book is David Walliams. I found this a really good book and I would recommend it to anyone. It’s fun, funny and hugely entertaining. I would rate Gangsta Granny 10 out of 10. Read this book and see what you think. If you enjoyed reading Gangsta Granny, why not try some of David Walliams other books like Billionaire Boy, Mr Stink, Ratburger or the Boy in the Dress! David Walliams, the author of Gangsta Granny and other books. By Ryan Patterson
  27. 27. Mario Galaxy By 2006, Nintendo was in third place in the battle between them Sony and Microsoft. The most famous game company had scared off many gamers with the Gamecube. Not only had they lost out on the console war, the system never had a worthy successor to the greatness that was super Mario 64. While Mario Sunshine was technically not a bad game, it was just not up to scratch by the plumbers high standards (much higher and better priced than any plumber). When the Wii came out it looked like Nintendo would lose out yet again. But gamers did not see these games coming, like Zelda Metroid and the game I’m reviewing, Mario galaxy. I saw trailers for Mario Galaxy back in 2007 and I was skeptical. Not only because it is on planets, but it also uses the Wii’s motion control. But then I got the game and boy was I wrong! The plot is like any other Mario game where the princess is taken and you need to collect 120 stars to rescue her. But there is a subplot with the girl trying to help you and it’s quite good. The gameplay is like any over platform. To jump you can shake the Wiimote to do a spin attack. Also there are stars and you use your Wii mote to point at them and collect them. The controls are some of the best in any game and it all feels very natural. Like Sonic Colours, because Mario Galaxy is in space, it means the game’s designers can use anything from a bee planet to a world full of flip switches. The graphics are the best you will find on the Wii. If there are any problems with Mario Galaxy it is that there is no Yoshi and little fan service for old school Nintendo fans, but these do not bring the game down. It is hard to put a score on this but it’s one game that made me smile all the time while playing it. I would give this a 9 out of 10 with the title of ‘near perfection.’ By Chris O’Brien
  28. 28. This Halloween, read our spooky story... The Old Lady and the House By Najifa Rashid I opened my eyes, a black sky greeted me. I looked around there wasn't much to see. There was a cemetery and across from it was a huge, black mansion. The windows were boarded up, the door was shut. The smell of the dead filled my nose. It was freezing; the moon had replaced the sun. The moonlight shone on the dark house. I saw a figure in the corner of my eye. I quickly turned around and the figure had disappeared. I felt a cold hand on my shoulder, I spun around. No one was there. I heard a creaking noise. The door was wide open “Come In,” an eerie voice said. Something drew me towards the door. I walked into the house; the house was empty and quiet. I walked into what seemed like a living room. The fireplace was lit, but the house was still freezing. There was an empty rocking chair in the corner of the room, it rocked slowly and made a squeaking noise. I heard a big bang from upstairs and followed the noise. The stairs were made out of wood and looked unstable. I carefully made my way up. All the doors were shut. I tried opening a door, it didn't budge. I tried one after another then finally one opened. I walked in; the smell of vanilla filled the room. There was another rocking chair in the corner of the room except it wasn't empty. An old woman was sitting in it. Her feet did not touch the ground, her head was looking down. “You shouldn't be here...” She said. It was the same voice that told me to come in. “Hello?” The woman looked up. Her face was melted; there were two black holes where her eyes should’ve been. Her lips were sewn together. I screamed and ran downstairs as fast as I could. The front door slammed closed. I turned around the woman was there, she was breathing heavily. She laughed, crazily. I ran back upstairs the woman followed. I realized that the woman actually didn't have any feet, she didn't walk, she floated. I ran into the room where I met her. There was a window and the door but the lady was blocking it. “No escape!” She yelled. I closed my eyes and jumped out of the window. I opened my eyes and gasped for air. It was a dream. I was in my bedroom. I heard a squeaking noise and my eyes followed the noise. It stopped on a rocking chair that wasn't there before. The old woman was sitting there. “No escape,” She said, laughing. Then everything went dark.
  29. 29. New Teachers We meet some of our new teachers to find out a little more about them. Look out for more in our next edition! Miss Dolan What do you teach? I teach maths. Why did you decide to become a teacher? I decided to be a teacher because I love working with kids and it’s important that people have a passion and enthusiasm for maths. Why do you like your subject? I loved maths at school; I loved that you could get the right answer. What do you enjoy doing? I love cycling, hill walking, knitting and going on holidays. Where is your favourite place? It definitely has to be New York.
  30. 30. New Teachers Miss Swan What do you teach? I teach Modern Studies and Social Subjects. Why did you decide to become a teacher? I used to work as a youth worker and I really enjoyed that so I thought teaching would be the next step. Why do you like your subject? I find the subject really interesting and I love teaching all aspects of it. What do you enjoy doing? I enjoy reading books, ice skating, Doctor Who and comic books. Where is your favourite place? My favourite places are Australia and New Zealand.
  31. 31. New Film Review This Month, we review... Two of Us By Chris O’Brien The two of us is a film depicting the last day that Paul McCartney and John Lennon (the two main writers in the Beatles) spent together. This film is not a second by second reconstruction of the day but what the writer imagined (no pun intended) would have happened. The film starts with Paul McCartney in New York promoting his band. John Lennon on the over hand was a year into his semi retirement from music to bring up his son. With Sean (his son) and his wife, Yoko, out of town, he finds himself bored. McCartney decided to drop into Lennon’s house for a visit. At first the two find that they share very little common ground. But after a while they start to have a good time and got on a rocky road to mutual respect. This is one of the best films on John Lennon (‘Nowhere Boy’ only just topping it.) Not only does it show the struggle of two best friend reconnecting, it also shows how different they have become with Paul being the arrogant pop star who is on top of the world and the worn out rock star turned father figure that John Lennon had become. John Lennon spends his whole time mocking McCartney’s career, while Paul is trying to impress him. I imagine that this would be the case, considering that Paul has talked about Lennon being like a big brother… and don’t we all want to impress our siblings . I know I do. With my twin, who I have never really got on with, I have always wanted him to say, “Yeah, you’re doing well.” This is only a small thing but it’s worth being brought up: the actors who play John and Paul have got their mannerisms down to a T, with Paul being cocky and John having that ‘Lennon style’ that is so hard to explain. So to conclude I would rate this film highly. It’s worth a look. Even if you are not into the Beatles, the film will make you see so much. I would give it an 8 of 10
  32. 32. OUR TEAM... Freya Willens Holly Szczypka Joshua Locke Tya Willens Delilah Fawcett Lottie Hirons Emily Wilson-Beales Jon Petrusev Carina Hodgson NEXT ISSUE Douglas Henderson Najifa Rashid Ellie Combe Christopher O’Brien Sarah Logan Robert Gornall Hannah Moodie Ryan Patterson Maya Coates Look out for: Our next edition, with the latest DGS news, recipes, reviews, interviews and much more!

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