Newspaper headlines and leads

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Newspaper headlines and leads

  1. 1. Newspaper Articles Objective: To improve your newspaper articles by writing interesting headlines, subheadings and lead paragraphs.
  2. 2. Starter <ul><li>List as many features of newspaper articles as you can remember. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Features of Newspaper Articles <ul><li>Headline </li></ul><ul><li>Subheading </li></ul><ul><li>By-line (who wrote the article) </li></ul><ul><li>Photo/image </li></ul><ul><li>Caption </li></ul><ul><li>Written in paragraphs and set out in columns </li></ul><ul><li>Third person (“witnesses say”, “John Smith won the race” etc) </li></ul><ul><li>Past tense (the event has already happened) </li></ul><ul><li>Uses mostly facts and some opinions </li></ul><ul><li>Uses some emotive language (to make it more interesting) </li></ul><ul><li>May be biased (but probably shouldn’t be!) </li></ul><ul><li>Uses quotes from notable people/experts/witnesses </li></ul><ul><li>Inverted pyramid structure </li></ul>
  4. 4. Headlines <ul><li>Newspapers use the following techniques to make their headlines interesting and attention –grabbing: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>An exclamation!!!! Where you make a big statement. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Alliteration. Where you make words next to each other start with the same sound. For example: “ B eckham Goes B onkers” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Pun. A play on words. Where you reference a play, TV show, saying, song or other thing that most people would know about, but you change it slightly so it is about your story. For example, in a story about a church burning down: “Holy Smoke!” (holy smoke is a saying, churches are holy…) </li></ul></ul>
  5. 5. Exclamations
  6. 6. Alliteration
  7. 7. Puns/Plays On Words
  8. 8. Task 1 <ul><li>Complete the headlines worksheet with a partner. </li></ul><ul><li>You have 5 minutes! </li></ul>
  9. 9. Task 2 <ul><li>Come up with a headline of your own for your article, using one of the three techniques we discussed. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Exclamations are easiest </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Alliteration is a bit trickier </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Puns are the hardest of all </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Often when headlines make jokes or are very short exclamations, they need more information to make sense. </li></ul><ul><li>A subheading provides that extra information, often in a more straightforward way. </li></ul><ul><li>Come up with a subheading for your article. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Lead Paragraphs <ul><li>A lead paragraph is the first paragraph of an article. </li></ul><ul><li>It summarises the story very briefly, by covering the what, who, when, where, why information. </li></ul><ul><li>Why do you think it does this, in a newspaper full of stories? </li></ul><ul><li>It wont give every detail away. </li></ul><ul><li>It is usually only one or two sentences long. </li></ul><ul><li>It is often in bold font, so it stands out. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Task 3 <ul><li>Write the lead paragraph of your article. </li></ul><ul><li>Use the following examples to help you: </li></ul><ul><li>“ SUPERMODEL KATE MOSS is engaged to marry her rock star boyfriend JAMIE HINCE, The Sun can reveal.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ MEGABUCKS striker Fernando Torres was summoned to dinner with Chelsea owner Roman Abramovich's enforcer on his first night as a Blues player.” </li></ul>
  12. 12. Remember emotive language? <ul><li>Using emotive language makes a story/headline/lead more interesting. </li></ul><ul><li>“ Model Kate Moss is engaged to her boyfriend, singer, Jamie Hince.” </li></ul><ul><li>OR </li></ul><ul><li>“ SUPER MODEL KATE MOSS is engaged to marry her rock star boyfriend JAMIE HINCE, The Sun can reveal.” </li></ul>
  13. 13. <ul><li>“ MEGABUCKS striker Fernando Torres was summoned to dinner with Chelsea owner Roman Abramovich's enforcer on his first night as a Blues player.” </li></ul>
  14. 14. Plenary <ul><li>Swap books. Read the headline, subheading and lead paragraph. </li></ul><ul><li>Check: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Does the headline use an exclamation, alliteration or a pun? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Does the subheading explain the story in more detail? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Is there emotive language to make it more interesting and attention grabbing? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Does the headline, subheading and lead make you want to read the rest of the story? </li></ul></ul>

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