Keynote The role of AIin social games     Uppsala   August 2011   Mirjam Palosaari Eladhari  Gotland University, Sweden
Common views:  •   ”Social games doesn’t have any AI”  •   ”Social games doesn’t need any AI – they have people”In this ta...
AI    Artificial intelligencethe study and design of intelligent agent where   an intelligent agent is a system that perce...
SocialThe term Social refers to a characteristic ofliving organisms (humans in particular, thoughbiologists also apply the...
Games on social       networks• We say “social games” – we mean “social  network games” (Siegel 2011). Usually that  means...
Social game typesIf Critera: Interactions between players   mediated by game rules    •   LARP    •   Table top & card gam...
Social actionsIn games, many low level processes together   represent metaphors for actions.We often to call games “social...
Illustration:Invade(though nice re game mechanics the mataphore isn’t social)• Empires and allies
In this talk Social       games are• (game) Systems where coexisting organisms  interact.• The organisms are intended to a...
AI based Game designAIGD is the practice of creating games where  the AI is an intrinsic part of the game design,  intertw...
Why AIGD•       In the space of AI based game design, established AI technologies        are used for innovative game desi...
AI to support theplayer character
Semi AutonomySemi-autonomous avatars are agents whoseactions are controlled partly by users andpartly by artificial intell...
Approaches    to semi-autnomous avatars•       Relief    •      Players can be relieved of cognitive and operational load ...
GoalsA shared aim of these approaches is toincrease the believability of elements in thegame worlds and the sense of prese...
Social game examples  (that are ”social” as described earlier in this talk)
Game examples•   PromWeek: Social physics•   Pataphysic Institute: mental physics•   Sims Social: avatar simulations
Prom Week• Prom Week: simulates characters in a  network of relationships. God-perspective  for player. Goals: play with t...
Pataphysic Institute• PI: simulates characters in networks of  relationships. 3rd person Role playing  persoective for pla...
Sims socialTaking the multiagentsimulation model andapplying a main-character- perspectiveon it.Using real-worldrelationsh...
Social Perspectives• PromWeek: Player manipulates many other  characters (multi-agent simulation) from a top-  down perspe...
Working with thepataphysic institute    prototype        follow the work at    www.projectconstructive.com
Goal: support Role-   Play in VGWs• Cater for complex, interesting avatars• support players in expressing consistent,  int...
Characterising Action   Potential (CAP)CAP is what characters can do at a given moment that  characterise them, both in te...
Experimental set-up• Agent architecture: The Mind Module• Prototype Game World: The Pataphysic  Institute• Play-tests and ...
Mind module
The Mind Module•   Spreading Activation Network of Affect nodes•   Semiautonomous agent architecture.     •   Semiautonomo...
Affect Nodes of MM
Personality Trait Nodes                            Define avatar                            personalityTraits: Five Factor...
Emotion Nodes16     Active emotion     nodes define     how an avatars     feels ‘right     now’
Mood  Define how an  avatar feel  today
SentimentAn emotional disposition towards a specific object              or class of objects.                        Defin...
Node WeightsPersonality Trait -> Emotion                                     Emotion -> Mood   Personality traits affect h...
Pataphysic Institute          emotional combat system!     Personality trait based characters!           Player-created bo...
Pataphysic Institute• Prototype virtual game world where the  personalities of the inhabitants are the base for  the game ...
productionPI is built in the company Pixeltamers framework for web basedmultiplayer games and is played in a web browser t...
Basic Game Play•   Players need to defeat physical manifestations of negative    mental states by using        •   Spells ...
’pataphysics
’pataphysicsJarry (the early 1900s, Paris)"the science of imaginary solutions, which   symbolically attributes the propert...
’pataphysics‘Pataphysics is an inner posture, a discipline, a   science and an art; it allows every human to live   her li...
Back-story•   Players are introduced to the back story of PI before they    log on, by reading the diary of Katherine, an ...
The gate keeper
Character CreationBig Five (OCEAN, FFM)assessed using IPIP NEO
Mind Module Info
Dialog with Karl
Node Weights      Karl: what I can do and can’t do is tied to my mood! The mood seems to be connected to my personality an...
Mind energy and                  resistanceKarl: what I can do and can’t do is tied to my mood! The mood seems to be conne...
Mood status display
Teresa
Mood Area restrictions      for affective actions Teresa: Affective actions are quite remarkable. They force an emotional ...
Affective actions
ManifestationsSingle Sentiment Manifestations (SSMs)             Compound Manifestations (CMs)   - origin in a single emot...
Colossuses of Confusion
Curses and Blessings• Avatars can be affected by the spells  Sentiment Curse and Sentiment Blessing.• Sentiment Curse give...
Player created CM
Spells
Mind     Mood Area         restrictionsMagic     for spellsSpells
Defeating guilt
Play test
Play testing                        Film                       Camera                                               Player...
Play testing            Player 1           (Object of                        Game            Desire)                      ...
Plat test scale and        scope• Multi-player tests – 3 players + 1 game master• 3 scenarios:  1. use AA’s according to r...
Scenario 1-AAsScenario: Two avatars competing for the affections of the thirdGM asked players to picture a situation where...
2. Learning spells Defeating       manifestationsScenario 2: GM takes group to area with negative single   sentiment manif...
3 player authored foesGM ask player to curse each other. Cursed player manifests the emotionthey cursed with. Players’ goa...
Players’ Strategies
uses of Affectiveactions in scenario 3:1. as authorial building blocks when creating   their compound manifestations,2. to...
Vertical slice test       outcomes• In the test: Using vertical slice in order to narrow down  • Successful designs  • Res...
Wrapping up
AI + ’social’ games =  = New AI tech!  Design challenges in social games can drive  new develelompent in AI technicues – n...
Why it works• Leverage the power of relationships in the  “third era” (Garriott 2011) – both between  individuals, and for...
Final words.      I suspect that:        Player created/generated “realness”                          +               ment...
Reading•   Comme il Faut 2: A fully realized model for socially-oriented gameplay, by Josh    McCoy, Mike Treanor, Ben Sam...
www.projectconstructive.com Thank youfor listening       Mirjam Eladharicontact: mirjam.eladhari@hgo.se
Recent Play testsPlay-tests of the PI prototype focussing on-   Authored relationships within the group (triangular tensio...
FUTuRE TESTING:- players’ attitudes towards CAP in PI for  role-play- Sentiments for story construction (more)- Semi-auton...
Current WorkAnalysis of play test data  • Video’s of game play in the client, along    with player’s face and voice  • Sur...
Future DirectionsPrototyping and play-testing methods for game  design research.Utilisation of bio-feedback from players, ...
NarrativePotential in VGWs
StanceHow affordances and action potential of avatars  in multiplayer settings can affect narrative  potential.
Outline•       Semi Autonomy    •    Relief, impression, expression• PI and MM    • Agent Architecture: The Mind Module   ...
ImpressionCharacter-information available only to avatars  own players shows the action potential of the  avatars - what t...
Control
The role of ai in social games eladhari2011 uppsalauni
The role of ai in social games eladhari2011 uppsalauni
The role of ai in social games eladhari2011 uppsalauni
The role of ai in social games eladhari2011 uppsalauni
The role of ai in social games eladhari2011 uppsalauni
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The role of ai in social games eladhari2011 uppsalauni

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Keynote at PhD course at Uppsala University in August 2011.

Outline:
•What does ”AI” and ”social” mean anyway?
•Social actions in terms of operational logics
•AI based game design
•Research prototype(s)
•A recipe

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The role of ai in social games eladhari2011 uppsalauni

  1. 1. Keynote The role of AIin social games Uppsala August 2011 Mirjam Palosaari Eladhari Gotland University, Sweden
  2. 2. Common views: • ”Social games doesn’t have any AI” • ”Social games doesn’t need any AI – they have people”In this talk: • What does ”AI” and ”social” mean anyway? • Social actions in terms of operational logics • AI based game design • Research prototype(s) • A recipe
  3. 3. AI Artificial intelligencethe study and design of intelligent agent where an intelligent agent is a system that perceives its environment and takes actions that maximize its chances of success. (Russell & Norvig 2003 – a commonly used textbook)the science and engineering of making intelligent machines . (McCarthy, 1956 – coining the term)
  4. 4. SocialThe term Social refers to a characteristic ofliving organisms (humans in particular, thoughbiologists also apply the term to populationsof other animals).It always refers to the interaction of organismswith other organisms and to their collectiveco-existence, irrespective of whether they areaware of it or not, and irrespective of whetherthe interaction is voluntary or involuntary.
  5. 5. Games on social networks• We say “social games” – we mean “social network games” (Siegel 2011). Usually that means: • Facebook • Asynchronous play (like old chess-by- mail games) • Metaphors for socializing (like sending gifts)
  6. 6. Social game typesIf Critera: Interactions between players mediated by game rules • LARP • Table top & card games • MMORPGS • Competitive FPS • Asynchronous games on social platforms…. • etcBroad! Most games except single player games would fit the critera, making it irrelevant.
  7. 7. Social actionsIn games, many low level processes together represent metaphors for actions.We often to call games “social” if these processes are metaphors for social actions. (ie, “greet” is social, while “shoot” isn’t seen as social in and everyday context.)Operational logics has been defined as follows (Wardrip-Fruin and Mateas, 2009): “An operational logic defines an authoring (representational) strategy, supported by abstract processes or lower-level logics, for specifying the behaviors a system must exhibit in order to be understood as representing a specified domain to a specified audience.”
  8. 8. Illustration:Invade(though nice re game mechanics the mataphore isn’t social)• Empires and allies
  9. 9. In this talk Social games are• (game) Systems where coexisting organisms interact.• The organisms are intended to appear life- like (or believiable)• The actions avialable to organisms in the system are metaphors for social actions (in the everyday sense of living beings socialising)
  10. 10. AI based Game designAIGD is the practice of creating games where the AI is an intrinsic part of the game design, intertwined in the game mechanics.When we talk about AI in games we approach it not only as a set of techniques, such as BDI architectures or path planners, but from a more philosophical perspective: the AI in AI based game design refers to when computational processes are designed and implemented to create the impression of something that acts with intentionality. This ‘something’ can be an agent, such as a non-player character, but it can also be a process that creates content for the game, such as quests, or new levels in a game.www.aigamedesign.com
  11. 11. Why AIGD• In the space of AI based game design, established AI technologies are used for innovative game design, and the needs emerging from game designs push forward the innovation of AI technologies.• A commonly held view regarding AI and games: • it is enough to create the impression of intelligence, the “smoke and mirrors”, by choosing the right cues that makes players use their mental models of a representation, relying on players’ immersion and imagination. • This is not a reason to not go beyond smoke and mirrors! • We can do real magic! Especially if we use the intelligence of the players. (again, remember Else’s talk on A-Life yesterday)
  12. 12. AI to support theplayer character
  13. 13. Semi AutonomySemi-autonomous avatars are agents whoseactions are controlled partly by users andpartly by artificial intelligence (AI) components.
  14. 14. Approaches to semi-autnomous avatars• Relief • Players can be relieved of cognitive and operational load by for example automating the animations of body-language of avatars.• Expression • Means of expression through body-language, types of actions performed, and reaction tendencies can express the nature of specific avatars to other players in the same world.• Impression • Character-information available only to avatars own players and personalised, subjective world-representations create individual impressions of worlds and avatars parts in them. More info here: Semi-Autonomous Avatars in Games, Eladhari, M.P, 10th International Conference on Intelligent Virtual Agents, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, September 2010.
  15. 15. GoalsA shared aim of these approaches is toincrease the believability of elements in thegame worlds and the sense of presence andimmersion for players.
  16. 16. Social game examples (that are ”social” as described earlier in this talk)
  17. 17. Game examples• PromWeek: Social physics• Pataphysic Institute: mental physics• Sims Social: avatar simulations
  18. 18. Prom Week• Prom Week: simulates characters in a network of relationships. God-perspective for player. Goals: play with the characters’ social actions in order to reach relationship goals.• AI: CiF architecture Comme il Faut 2: A fully realized model for socially-oriented gameplay, by Josh McCoy, Mike Treanor, Ben Samuel, Brandon Tearse, Michael Mateas, and Noah Wardrip-Fruin. In Proceedings of the FDG Intelligent Narrative Technologies 3 Workshop (FDG-INT3 2010), Monterey, CA. June 2010.
  19. 19. Pataphysic Institute• PI: simulates characters in networks of relationships. 3rd person Role playing persoective for player: Goals attune own others mood in order to defeat common enemies.• AI: The Mind Module
  20. 20. Sims socialTaking the multiagentsimulation model andapplying a main-character- perspectiveon it.Using real-worldrelationships – thecharacter the playercontrols interact withcharacters of facebookfriends. (timelyillustration of the 3rdera of gaming asdescribed by Garriot2011 GDCE)
  21. 21. Social Perspectives• PromWeek: Player manipulates many other characters (multi-agent simulation) from a top- down perspective.• PI: Player control own avatar while interacting with other players’ characters, mobs and NPCs.• Sims Social: Player controls a single character while it interacts with representations of facebook friends’ characters. (asyncronous play, hybrid of multi/single player)
  22. 22. Working with thepataphysic institute prototype follow the work at www.projectconstructive.com
  23. 23. Goal: support Role- Play in VGWs• Cater for complex, interesting avatars• support players in expressing consistent, interesting player characters in VGWs? • body-language etc.• Support by rule system in order to make the actions performed characterising for particular avatars. Mirjam P Eladhari, Michael Mateas University of Californa Santa Cruz
  24. 24. Characterising Action Potential (CAP)CAP is what characters can do at a given moment that characterise them, both in terms of observable behaviour and in expression of true character - a characters essential nature, expressed by the choices a character makes.The observable characteristics include visual appearance, what body language characters use, what sounds they make, what they say, and most important, what they do and how they behave.
  25. 25. Experimental set-up• Agent architecture: The Mind Module• Prototype Game World: The Pataphysic Institute• Play-tests and interviews which are video taped and transcribed verbatim. Allows assessment of: • Interaction • Players’ attitudes • Players’ mental models of system. More on the method in Design for Results: Considerations for Experimental Prototyping and Play Testing Using Iterative Game Design, by Eladhari M. P., Ollila, E.M.I. Game Research Methods, University of Tampere, Finland, 8-9 April 2010.
  26. 26. Mind module
  27. 27. The Mind Module• Spreading Activation Network of Affect nodes• Semiautonomous agent architecture. • Semiautonomous agents are partly controlled by their players, and partly controlled by context- sensitive action potential and expression possibilities, as well as by varying degrees of autonomous reactions to in-game situations specific to the VGW the agents inhabits.• Gives avatars virtual minds in addition to virtual bodies.
  28. 28. Affect Nodes of MM
  29. 29. Personality Trait Nodes Define avatar personalityTraits: Five Factor Model
  30. 30. Emotion Nodes16 Active emotion nodes define how an avatars feels ‘right now’
  31. 31. Mood Define how an avatar feel today
  32. 32. SentimentAn emotional disposition towards a specific object or class of objects. Define how avatar generally feels about specific things
  33. 33. Node WeightsPersonality Trait -> Emotion Emotion -> Mood Personality traits affect how strongly characters feel emotions. Emotions affect characters’ mood.
  34. 34. Pataphysic Institute emotional combat system! Personality trait based characters! Player-created bosses!Manifestations of own Traumas and epiphanies!
  35. 35. Pataphysic Institute• Prototype virtual game world where the personalities of the inhabitants are the base for the game mechanics.• When interacting with other characters, the action potential depends upon the player characters current mood and personality
  36. 36. productionPI is built in the company Pixeltamers framework for web basedmultiplayer games and is played in a web browser through a Javaapplet.PI is an application developed for conducting experimental gamedesign research using iterative design and guided play tests. TheMM is used as a library. • Programming of Client and Server by Christoph Pech. • IPIP NEO - scoring system and report routines provided by John A. Johnson, rewritten to C++ by Christoph Pech • Graphics: 3DS Max models by Ola Persson • Leveldesign by Musse Dolk • Scripting by Johan Sköld
  37. 37. Basic Game Play• Players need to defeat physical manifestations of negative mental states by using • Spells • Affective actions• The spells available to characters depends on their personality and current mood.• The affective actions available to a character depend on the current mood.
  38. 38. ’pataphysics
  39. 39. ’pataphysicsJarry (the early 1900s, Paris)"the science of imaginary solutions, which symbolically attributes the properties of objects, described by their virtuality, to their lineaments“Raymond Queneau has described pataphysics as resting "on the truth of contradictions and exceptions."
  40. 40. ’pataphysics‘Pataphysics is an inner posture, a discipline, a science and an art; it allows every human to live her life as an exception, which doesnt prove any other law than its own.Above my favourite definition. My translation from a book in Swedish by Claes Hylinger
  41. 41. Back-story• Players are introduced to the back story of PI before they log on, by reading the diary of Katherine, an investigator who was sent in to PI to investigate the consequences of a mysterious event called the Outbreak. In PI, reality has been replaced by the inhabitants interpretation of reality, and their mental states are manifested physically in the environment.• The head of human resources at PI has taken upon himself the task of understanding the new and unknown world by applying personality theories. He forces everyone in PI to take personality tests, and studies what types of abilities these persons get: Mind Magic Spells.• Teresa focuses on the finding that social interactions between people suddenly in acutely concrete emotional reactions. She calls these Affective Actions (AAs), and tries to understand her changed environment by studying the patterns of these.
  42. 42. The gate keeper
  43. 43. Character CreationBig Five (OCEAN, FFM)assessed using IPIP NEO
  44. 44. Mind Module Info
  45. 45. Dialog with Karl
  46. 46. Node Weights Karl: what I can do and can’t do is tied to my mood! The mood seems to be connected to my personality and my emotions. I think its like that for all of us. But we seem to be able to gain more resistance and energy as we learn to act in this world.Personality Trait -> Emotion Emotion -> Mood Personality traits affect how strongly characters feel emotions. Emotions affect characters’ mood.
  47. 47. Mind energy and resistanceKarl: what I can do and can’t do is tied to my mood! The mood seems to be connected to my personality and my emotions. Ithink its like that for all of us. But we seem to be able to gain more resistance and energy as we learn to act in this world.
  48. 48. Mood status display
  49. 49. Teresa
  50. 50. Mood Area restrictions for affective actions Teresa: Affective actions are quite remarkable. They force an emotional reaction! If you are in a receptive mood that is.Players can perform affective actions towardsother characters in order to change their mentalstate in both positive and negative ways. Byaffecting others moods the selection of theiravailable spells and AAs is changed.Example:The AA Comfort can be used successfully ontargets that have an active emotion node ofSadness, but only if the players own avatar is notin the area of Furious on the mood co-ordinatesystem
  51. 51. Affective actions
  52. 52. ManifestationsSingle Sentiment Manifestations (SSMs) Compound Manifestations (CMs) - origin in a single emotion - unique, that is, there is only one - limited amount of mental resistance and - CMs are stronger than SSMs in terms energy. of larger maximum amounts of MR and ME - The spells an SSM can cast increase the value of their emotion in targeted entity. - more versatile in their behaviour, they can cast both spells and AAs. Instantiation: scripted or created - In order to vanquish a CM generally automatically when avatars experience several players need to co-operate. strong emotions. For example, if a PC feels a Joy intensely the SSM Joy Jumbo is Instantiation: CMs are scripted or instantiated in proximity to the PC. authored by players.
  53. 53. Colossuses of Confusion
  54. 54. Curses and Blessings• Avatars can be affected by the spells Sentiment Curse and Sentiment Blessing.• Sentiment Curse gives an avatar a strong negative sentiment that has a zero decay rate. • Example: curse of Guilt. The way to get rid of this sentiment is to create a manifestation of the sentiment, a compound manifestation (CM). If the CM is vanquished, the sentiment disappears.
  55. 55. Player created CM
  56. 56. Spells
  57. 57. Mind Mood Area restrictionsMagic for spellsSpells
  58. 58. Defeating guilt
  59. 59. Play test
  60. 60. Play testing Film Camera Player 1 1 (Object of Game Desire) Master Player 2 Player 3In Clients:-Log files of play (one file foreach avatar) Film-Camtasia recordings of Camera :-voice (microphone in headset), -Face (webcam), - Actions (taping of screen)
  61. 61. Play testing Player 1 (Object of Game Desire) MasterPlayer 2 Player 3
  62. 62. Plat test scale and scope• Multi-player tests – 3 players + 1 game master• 3 scenarios: 1. use AA’s according to roles in a group 2. learn to use spells towards manifestations 3. Player’s authoring of manifestation. Cooperate in group to overcome them.
  63. 63. Scenario 1-AAsScenario: Two avatars competing for the affections of the thirdGM asked players to picture a situation where two of them (Player 1 and 2) had played together for a while, and that the third (Player 1) was new to them,
  64. 64. 2. Learning spells Defeating manifestationsScenario 2: GM takes group to area with negative single sentiment manifestations.Goal: cooperate to overcome them, and learn own special personality spells.
  65. 65. 3 player authored foesGM ask player to curse each other. Cursed player manifests the emotionthey cursed with. Players’ goals: deafeat the foe using grouped indivuals’spells. Use AAs to affect each others moods needed to defeat foe.
  66. 66. Players’ Strategies
  67. 67. uses of Affectiveactions in scenario 3:1. as authorial building blocks when creating their compound manifestations,2. to manipulate the mood of each other’s avatars when they attempted to neutralize the manifestations, and3. to diminish values of the emotion nodes of the opposing manifestations.
  68. 68. Vertical slice test outcomes• In the test: Using vertical slice in order to narrow down • Successful designs • Results of general interest• Design-wise for prototype: Players’ creation of manifestations, and the strategies used to defeat them: a combination of rule-set, and ”real” past experiences.• General regarding avatar & agent behaviors: levels of autonomy & focus on secondary behavior (read more in digra’11 paper) Game Mechanics and Dynamics of Social Actions in a Prototype Multiplayer Game World, by Eladhari M.P, Proceedings of DiGRA 2011 Conference: Think Design Play, Utrecht School of the Arts, the Netherlands, 2011.
  69. 69. Wrapping up
  70. 70. AI + ’social’ games = = New AI tech! Design challenges in social games can drive new develelompent in AI technicues – new problems, new solutions= New types of games! Games with metaphores for social actions –is in the domain of beleviable agents and expessive AI – new game experiences built using knowledge about social behaviors. www.aigamedesign.com
  71. 71. Why it works• Leverage the power of relationships in the “third era” (Garriott 2011) – both between individuals, and formations of groups.• Notion of what is ”real” (Bartle 2003). Player- created ’real’ content in frameworks of fiction: compelling. (If the balance suits players’ golden mean for real-connection vs escapism.)
  72. 72. Final words. I suspect that: Player created/generated “realness” + mental/social physics +rule-systems giving appropriate affordances for action + support for avatar expression, impression & relief = meaningful fun.
  73. 73. Reading• Comme il Faut 2: A fully realized model for socially-oriented gameplay, by Josh McCoy, Mike Treanor, Ben Samuel, Brandon Tearse, Michael Mateas, and Noah Wardrip-Fruin. In Proceedings of the FDG Intelligent Narrative Technologies 3 Workshop (FDG-INT3 2010), Monterey, CA. June 2010.• Game Mechanics and Dynamics of Social Actions in a Prototype Multiplayer Game World, by Eladhari M.P, Proceedings of DiGRA 2011 Conference: Think Design Play, Utrecht School of the Arts, the Netherlands, 2011.• Design for Results: Considerations for Experimental Prototyping and Play Testing Using Iterative Game Design, by Eladhari M. P., Ollila, E.M.I. Game Research Methods, University of Tampere, Finland, 8-9 April 2010. The paper was selected for publication in a special issue of the journal Simulation & Gaming
  74. 74. www.projectconstructive.com Thank youfor listening Mirjam Eladharicontact: mirjam.eladhari@hgo.se
  75. 75. Recent Play testsPlay-tests of the PI prototype focussing on- Authored relationships within the group (triangular tensions given by sentiments)- Players’ authoring of CMs – their contributions to the game world- patterns of play when the group deals with the CM’s they created. Role-takings and strategies.
  76. 76. FUTuRE TESTING:- players’ attitudes towards CAP in PI for role-play- Sentiments for story construction (more)- Semi-autonomy – balance of player- control versus autonomous behaviours of avatars- Autonomous agents (NPCs) with MMs, use of reactive planning for behaviour selection
  77. 77. Current WorkAnalysis of play test data • Video’s of game play in the client, along with player’s face and voice • Surveys • Log files • counts of Affective Actions towards group.memebers, depending on sentiments between avatars • Counts of Affective Actions and Spells between entities when conquering the CMs players authored
  78. 78. Future DirectionsPrototyping and play-testing methods for game design research.Utilisation of bio-feedback from players, both for design and for play-testing.
  79. 79. NarrativePotential in VGWs
  80. 80. StanceHow affordances and action potential of avatars in multiplayer settings can affect narrative potential.
  81. 81. Outline• Semi Autonomy • Relief, impression, expression• PI and MM • Agent Architecture: The Mind Module • Prototype: The Pataphysic Institute• CAP of semi-autonomous avatars and narrative potential.
  82. 82. ImpressionCharacter-information available only to avatars own players shows the action potential of the avatars - what they can do at a given moment and how. The properties of avatars can be used to represent the game world subjectively, helping players to identify with their representations and immerse themselves into story worlds.Ex: in Michael’s Subjective Avatars users receive text descriptions of environments which react avatars emotional states.
  83. 83. Control

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