How We Value Arts and Culture: John Holden

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This is minivations notes on the 2009 paper by John Holden.

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How We Value Arts and Culture: John Holden

  1. 1. minivation Presents their notes on: John Holden (2009). How We Value Arts and culture.Asia Pacific Journal of Arts & Cultural Management Vol. 6, No. 2, pp. 447 – 456.
  2. 2. Two meanings = oppositional.High culture vs popular culture. This led to a lot of confusion.
  3. 3. Today though…
  4. 4. Consequences of this…
  5. 5. The internet is just one factorthat enables this to happen.
  6. 6. Does this shift matter?Yes, because now culture is no longer just a small part of the economy and something quaint for society.
  7. 7. Reason 1: Value…“It seems that people are valuing experiences, and the things that give their lives meaning. They are letting go of the consumption of goods sooner, than letting go of their consumption and production of culture.” p.451
  8. 8. Reason 2: Foreign relations… “We are all having much more interaction with and exposure to other people and other nations.We encounter difference at every turn, what happens on the streets of NY one minute can lead to riots in Islamabad the next.In these circumstances we understandand misunderstand each other as well, through the medium of culture.” p.451
  9. 9. Reason 3: Identity… “…where we define ourselves not so much by our jobs - because those come and go - and not so much by our geography - because we move around -but by our cultural consumption and production. I am who I am, and you are who you are,because of what we watch, read, listen to, write and play.” p.451
  10. 10. All this serves to shift the need for cultureCC 2011 minivationminivation, Unit 27 City Business Centre, Winchester, Hampshire, SO23 7JF from being a „nice‟ thing to behold,Designations used by companies to distinguish their products are often claimed as trademarks.All brand names and product names used in this book are trade names, service marks, trademarks or registered trademarksof their respective owners. The Publisher is not associated with any product or vendor mentioned in this book.to an essential element of our continuingDISCLAIMER: Whilst the information herein is supplied in good faith, no responsibility is taken by either the publisher or the authorfor any damage, injury or loss, however caused, which may arise from the use of the information provided. education.www.minivation.orgThis work is published for educational purposes by minivation and is licenced under theCreative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0UK: England & Wales License.To view a copy of this licence, visit:http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/or send a letter to:Creative Commons,171 Second Street, Even our ability to networkSuite 300,San Francisco,California 94105,USA and/or access groups.Graphics referenced on page all others CC 9ines.
  11. 11. In this new paradigm, none of these are more important than any other.
  12. 12. Policy now more important. Much broader issuesconcerned with culture.Culture concerned withmuch broader issues.
  13. 13. Behold, the three (contemporary) values of culture… Intrinsic p.454
  14. 14. Intrinsic: Abstract notions = fun / beauty / sublime. Difficult (for policy) to measure and describe. “Intrinsic means integral to, or an essential part of.” p.452
  15. 15. Instrumental: Accomplishment of (external) aims through the culture. p.452
  16. 16. Institutional: The way the cultural suppliers act in our society.
  17. 17. Intrinsic
  18. 18. Conclusion“ What you value, and the language and metrics youuse to describe that value, depends on who you are.” Motivation = key. p.455
  19. 19. CC minivationminivation, Unit 27 City Business Centre, Winchester, Hampshire, SO23 7JFDesignations used by companies to distinguish their products are often claimed as trademarks.All brand names and product names used in this publication are trade names, service marks, trademarks or registered trademarksof their respective owners. The Publisher is not associated with any product or vendor mentioned.DISCLAIMER: Whilst the information herein is supplied in good faith, no responsibility is taken by either the publisher or the authorfor any damage, injury or loss, however caused, in any form, which may arise from the use of the information provided.www.minivation.orgThis work is published for educational purposes by minivation (2012) and is licenced under theCreative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0UK: England & Wales License.To view a copy of this licence, visit:http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/or send a letter to:Creative Commons,171 Second Street,Suite 300,San Francisco,California 94105,USA

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