Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

5 Myths About Young Children And Screen Media

450 views

Published on

Debunking common misconceptions about the impact of screen use on babies and toddlers. The myths:
All screen time is detrimental to early learning
Children aren’t impacted by TV that plays in the background
TV at bedtime can help lull children to sleep
Parental cell phone use doesn’t affect kids’ behavior
The more interactive a screen experience is, the better for kids

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

5 Myths About Young Children And Screen Media

  1. 1. 7 1 .4 5 I. / ’ E 5 Z” , , f V. CHILDREN AND SCREEN MEDIA :1, S A / , ’ Debunking common misconceptions about the I / ’/ x,, ,,, , impact of screen use on babies and toddlers V 6. , / T All screen time is detrimental to early learning. Although children learn best through hands-on exploration, the reality is that most young children are exposed to screen media at a very young age and can learn from these experiences. What is most important is that: (1) content is age-appropriate, (2) viewing time is limited, and (3) parents are involved and help children make the connection between what they see on the screen I and the real world. § Children aren’t impacted by TV 2» that plays in the background. J: S — V. l 5, / /// /// /// Study after study shows that background TV interferes with children's play and learning. Exposure to programming not designed for young children, even when it is playing in the background, is associated with a negative effect on children's language development, cognitive development, and executive functioning, ’'*o’‘“ W at bedtime can help lull children to sleep. Studies have shown that viewingTV within 2 hours of bedtime can make it harder for children to fall asleep. l ). )) Parental cell phone use c! oesn’t attect kids’ behavior. §§ § 4 T. § .4 I x, ‘Q A recent study that involved observing families at fast—food restaurants found that 40 out of the 55 parents used a mobile device during the meal. The longer that parents interacted with their mobile devices, the more likely their children were to act out. The more in'teractive a screen experience is, the better tor kids. / /// // _§. One study involving e-books showed that more interactive features actually interfered with children's ability to focus on the storyline. Although e—books can still be useful tools for Children, it is important for parents to help children focus on the story and not allow the technology to drive the experience. ‘‘ V7 (fig; Learn More About Young Children and Screen Media Use and Downlocici c: t‘-L‘. F.l: E Copy of screen sense by Visiting: ~r ‘-1 ‘ “s: " r‘ l A s V’ 1 W, " '3 ‘ex’ . ¥ , A . . l . .— . - "*§"‘ . ll '-‘em r . q ’ <; "m'v. . ~ e’~L ~ Q“ do Screen Sense Setting the Record Straight . .,, (,, _ , , . . its . )~¥ ‘ Screen Sense: Setting the Record Straight—Fi‘esearch—Based Guidelines for Screen Use for Children Under 3 Years Old Is released by ZERO TO THREE. Screen Sense was written by Claire Lerner, LCSW, ZERO TO THREE, and Rachel Barr, PhD, Georgetown University, in partnership with leading researchers in the field of media and young children. % ZERO T0 THREE“ Copyright © 2014 by zERoTo THREE. Parenting Resources

×