Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] A WebQuest for 12th Grade Engl...
Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] The day is July 17, 1897.  You...
Student Page Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] <ul><li>As a beginning reporter you ...
Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Congratulations!  You have bee...
Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] You should by now have the sup...
Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Now that you have read all of ...
Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Process Continued             ...
Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] You have now completed the Web...
Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Credits: Photo Slide #1 Chilko...
[ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page A WebQuest for 12th Grade En...
[ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This lesson was developed to...
[ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This lesson is intended for ...
[ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page As a result of this lesson s...
[ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Evaluation Teacher Script Co...
[ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Evaluation Teacher Script Co...
[ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This lesson is very pre-pack...
[ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Evaluation Teacher Script Co...
[ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Intro Material: -”Today we w...
[ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page You and your class have now ...
[ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Evaluation Teacher Script Co...
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Jack London and the Alaskan Gold Rush

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Jack London and the Alaskan Gold Rush

  1. 1. Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] A WebQuest for 12th Grade English Students Designed by Todd Miller [email_address] Based on a template from The WebQuest Page The Chilkoot Trail Photo is Public Domain Process Continued
  2. 2. Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] The day is July 17, 1897. You are a new reporter working for a local newspaper in Seattle, Washington called The Seattle Post-Intelligencer . News has just arrived from the Distant land of Alaska where gold has just been discovered. Your job: The editor has decided to send you to the distant Yukon Territory to report on the life and conditions of the miners who have made the treacherous journey north. You must examine carefully the trail the miners took to Alaska, the tools that were needed on the trail, and life for the miners once they arrived in Alaska. While in Alaska it will be imperative for you to contact you guide, Jack London, an American author who has made the trip before you. You must find London, interview him, and report back on some of the conditions and experiences that he must have encountered. This interview will help to establish a connection between the Readers of Jack London’s works while at the same time giving the readers a chance to experience the context in which some of Jack London’s most famous and endearing works were written and conceived. Gold Nuggets Photo is Public Domain Process Continued
  3. 3. Student Page Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] <ul><li>As a beginning reporter you will travel to the dangerous lands of the Yukon Territory to discover the vast untouched wilderness. Along the way you will need to learn many valuable skills in order to survive: </li></ul><ul><li>-You must discover who was the first person to discover gold in order to ensure they get the credit they deserve. </li></ul><ul><li>-You will discover which route is the best one to reach the gold everyone so desires. </li></ul><ul><li>You must choose and purchase supplies that will be needed along the way. </li></ul><ul><li>You must accurately report on the conditions of the trail up into Alaska </li></ul><ul><li>Finally, it will be your job to discover what life was like for the miners once they reached the Alaskan Frontier </li></ul><ul><li>Once all of your initial research has been accomplished it will be time to begin the next phase of your journey. You must find the American author Jack London. You must examine some of the writing that London has done about the Alaskan wilderness and make connections between his work and the conditions that he was living in at the time. </li></ul>Title Jack London Photo is Public Domain Process Continued
  4. 4. Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Congratulations! You have been chosen to embark upon a once in a lifetime opportunity. Your editor has decided to send you to the great Alaskan wilderness to discover the origins of the gold rush that is currently occurring there. Before you begin however, you must do some basic research in order to survive in the harsh climates of the north. By reading the following passages you will have a good idea what is required to make the journey and the living conditions of Alaska when you arrive. Be sure to make good notes along the way in your travel journal, the editor will need to see all of your notes when you are finished. The year is 1897 and the first reports of gold in Alaska have begun to trickle into the port town of Seattle, Washington. To you, a junior reporter for The Seattle Post-Intelligencer, the job of chronicling the journey to Alaska has been assigned. Before you embark upon your journey you must first discover the names of the men who first discovered the gold that sparked this great northern rush. There are rumors circulating that it was a man named Skookum Jim Mason who was the first to make a discovery. Now that you have some idea who was the first to discover gold in the Yukon, you must now decide how to get to Alaska for yourself. You may want to go via the Chilkoot Trail . So far this way has been well used by prospectors going north. Next, you will need to chose which supplies you will take along the journey with you. According to a new law that has been passed in Canada, prospectors are now required to carry enough supplies to last up to one year. You may want to go to the McDougall and Secord general store to find the necessary supplies. A Miner Resting Along the Chilkoot Trail Photo is Public Domain Process Continued
  5. 5. Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] You should by now have the supplies that you will need to head north. You have also decided on the best trail to take to get into the Yukon. There are only a few more things you must discover. What is life like for the early prospectors and miners? You may want to discover what life may have been like in Dawson City , one of the gold capitals of the Yukon territory. You may also want to discover what life was like for early miners in Alaska. To do this you may want to read one of the poems by Yukon author Robert Service . These poems offer beautiful imagery which can easily describe the hardships and trials of the early miners. And finally, you must locate and interview the American author Jack London. He and his brother are rumored to be headed toward the Yukon even as we speak. Before you go however, it might benefit to do a bit of research on your interview subject. Be sure to find and read a biography on London before you go north. Now that you know a bit about Jack London it is important to discover a bit about his writing. You can read this short story that has been published called, To Build A Fire . This is the short story that you will be analyzing in order to discover in what context Jack London was writing. You now have all of the information that you will need to survive your journey north to Alaska. As you journey be sure to take accurate notes in your travel journal. You will now be required to write a three to four page report on the conditions that London was writing in and how those conditions affected the final outcome of his work. Flyer for Passage to Yukon Photo is Public Domain Process Continued
  6. 6. Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Now that you have read all of the background information it will your job to write a 3-4 page paper on the topic of Jack London and his use of context while writing. The steps below will help with the overall writing process: 1. Read all of the background information on Jack London and the Alaskan Gold Rush 2. Read the Jack London Short Story, To Build A Fire. 3. Use the background information to develop the paper. Questions you should ask: 1. What where the living conditions like that Jack London was writing in and how do those conditions translate to the short story? 2. How did the effect of the Yukon have an impact on London’s work? This paper should be presented in Double-spaced format with 12 point font. It should be approximately 3-4 pages in length. Flyer for Passage to Yukon Photo is Public Domain Process Continued
  7. 7. Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Process Continued                                 CATEGORY 4 3 2 1 Organization Information is very organized with well-constructed paragraphs and subheadings. Information is organized with well-constructed paragraphs. Information is organized, but paragraphs are not well-constructed. The information appears to be disorganized. 8) Internet Use Successfully uses suggested internet links to find information and navigates within these sites easily without assistance. Usually able to use suggested internet links to find information and navigates within these sites easily without assistance. Occasionally able to use suggested internet links to find information and navigates within these sites easily without assistance. Needs assistance or supervision to use suggested internet links and/or to navigate within these sites. Notes Notes are recorded and organized in an extremely neat and orderly fashion. Notes are recorded legibly and are somewhat organized. Notes are recorded. Notes are recorded only with peer/teacher assistance and reminders. First Draft Detailed draft is neatly presented and includes all required information. Draft includes all required information and is legible. Draft includes most required information and is legible. Draft is missing required information and is difficult to read. Final Draft Detailed draft is neatly presented and includes all required information. Final Draft is highly polished. Draft includes all required information and is legible. Final draft shows some polish. Draft includes most required information and is legible. Draft is missing required information and is difficult to read. Mechanics No grammatical, spelling or punctuation errors. Almost no grammatical, spelling or punctuation errors A few grammatical spelling, or punctuation errors. Many grammatical, spelling, or punctuation errors. Paragraph Construction All paragraphs include introductory sentence, explanations or details, and concluding sentence. Most paragraphs include introductory sentence, explanations or details, and concluding sentence. Paragraphs included related information but were typically not constructed well. Paragraphing structure was not clear and sentences were not typically related within the paragraphs.
  8. 8. Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] You have now completed the Webquest about Jack London and the Alaskan Gold Rush. By now you will have crafted a three to four page paper detailing the contextual sources that Jack London used for his writing. Yukon Gold Company Photo is Public Domain Process Continued
  9. 9. Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Credits: Photo Slide #1 Chilkoot Trail http://tinyurl.com/5upsaq Photo Slide #2 Gold http://tinyurl.com/5f8dor Photo Slide #3 Jack London http://tinyurl.com/58d9eb Photo Slide #4 Miner http://tinyurl.com/58kj53 Photo Slide #5 Poster http://tinyurl.com/6x7384 Photo Slide #6 Yukon gold comp http://tinyurl.com/58kj53 Process Continued
  10. 10. [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page A WebQuest for 12th Grade English Students Designed by Todd Miller [email_address] Based on a template from The WebQuest Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion The Chilkoot Trail Photo is Public Domain Process Continued
  11. 11. [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This lesson was developed to satisfy a technology requirement of Colorado State university’s Technology in Education course. This WebQuest is intended to develop a contextual awareness of Jack London’s primary setting, the Alaskan Frontier. Students should read the contextual material and be able to synthesize this information within a Jack London short story. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Gold Nuggets Photo is Public Domain Process Continued
  12. 12. [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This lesson is intended for advanced level English students. It is primarily focused towards 12 th grade seniors in high school or an early level college course like American Literature. If the end assignment requirement were changed this assignment could be adapted towards any grade level. To decrease the difficulty a teacher could turn the final paper into a report or some sort of an art project. Ex. Students could be required to draw pictures of what they would need to bring north or they could write a report that talks about the basic conditions that the miners were living in. Prior to working with this lesson as it is the students should have some background in dealing with contextual information. If the assignment is modified there would be no background information required. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Process Continued
  13. 13. [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page As a result of this lesson students should show and demonstrate an awareness of contextual influence upon literature of all genres. Students should demonstrate the ability to read contextual background information about certain pieces of literature. Once this background information is read the students should then be able to assimilate that background information into their discussion of the piece. Ex. A student reads background information on slavery, segregation, and the post-constructionist south, they would then assimilate this information into a discussion of the book To Kill A Mockingbird. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Process Continued
  14. 14. [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Congratulations! You have been chosen to embark upon a once in a lifetime opportunity. Your editor has decided to send you to the great Alaskan wilderness to discover the origins of the gold rush that is currently occurring there. Before you begin however, you must do some basic research in order to survive in the harsh climates of the north. By reading the following passages you will have a good idea what is required to make the journey and the living conditions of Alaska when you arrive. Be sure to make good notes along the way in your travel journal, the editor will need to see all of your notes when you are finished. The year is 1897 and the first reports of gold in Alaska have begun to trickle into the port town of Seattle, Washington. To you, a junior reporter for The Seattle Post-Intelligencer, the job of chronicling the journey to Alaska has been assigned. Before you embark upon your journey you must first discover the names of the men who first discovered the gold that sparked this great northern rush. There are rumors circulating that it was a man named Skookum Jim Mason who was the first to make a discovery. Now that you have some idea who was the first to discover gold in the Yukon, you must now decide how to get to Alaska for yourself. You may want to go via the Chilkoot Trail . So far this way has been well used by prospectors going north. Next, you will need to chose which supplies you will take along the journey with you. According to a new law that has been passed in Canada, prospectors are now required to carry enough supplies to last up to one year. You may want to go to the McDougall and Secord general store to find the necessary supplies. Process Continued
  15. 15. [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion You should by now have the supplies that you will need to head north. You have also decided on the best trail to take to get into the Yukon. There are only a few more things you must discover. What is life like for the early prospectors and miners? You may want to discover what life may have been like in Dawson City , one of the gold capitals of the Yukon territory. You may also want to discover what life was like for early miners in Alaska. To do this you may want to read one of the poems by Yukon author Robert Service . These poems offer beautiful imagery which can easily describe the hardships and trials of the early miners. And finally, you must locate and interview the American author Jack London. He and his brother are rumored to be headed toward the Yukon even as we speak. Before you go however, it might benefit to do a bit of research on your interview subject. Be sure to find and read a biography on London before you go north. Now that you know a bit about Jack London it is important to discover a bit about his writing. You can read this short story that has been published called, To Build A Fire . This is the short story that you will be analyzing in order to discover in what context Jack London was writing. You now have all of the information that you will need to survive your journey north to Alaska. As you journey be sure to take accurate notes in your travel journal. You will now be required to write a three to four page report on the conditions that London was writing in and how those conditions affected the final outcome of his work. Process Continued
  16. 16. [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This lesson is very pre-packaged. The only resource needed is a computer lab with internet access which the students can access. There is no need for books or other physical materials; Everything that is needed is contained within this lesson. The teacher will play the role of moderator within this exercise. It will be the job of the teacher to help facilitate the students with their learning. They will be needed to help with the internet searches and the final assimilation of the material. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Process Continued
  17. 17. [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Process Continued                                 CATEGORY 4 3 2 1 Organization Information is very organized with well-constructed paragraphs and subheadings. Information is organized with well-constructed paragraphs. Information is organized, but paragraphs are not well-constructed. The information appears to be disorganized. 8) Internet Use Successfully uses suggested internet links to find information and navigates within these sites easily without assistance. Usually able to use suggested internet links to find information and navigates within these sites easily without assistance. Occasionally able to use suggested internet links to find information and navigates within these sites easily without assistance. Needs assistance or supervision to use suggested internet links and/or to navigate within these sites. Notes Notes are recorded and organized in an extremely neat and orderly fashion. Notes are recorded legibly and are somewhat organized. Notes are recorded. Notes are recorded only with peer/teacher assistance and reminders. First Draft Detailed draft is neatly presented and includes all required information. Draft includes all required information and is legible. Draft includes most required information and is legible. Draft is missing required information and is difficult to read. Final Draft Detailed draft is neatly presented and includes all required information. Final Draft is highly polished. Draft includes all required information and is legible. Final draft shows some polish. Draft includes most required information and is legible. Draft is missing required information and is difficult to read. Mechanics No grammatical, spelling or punctuation errors. Almost no grammatical, spelling or punctuation errors A few grammatical spelling, or punctuation errors. Many grammatical, spelling, or punctuation errors. Paragraph Construction All paragraphs include introductory sentence, explanations or details, and concluding sentence. Most paragraphs include introductory sentence, explanations or details, and concluding sentence. Paragraphs included related information but were typically not constructed well. Paragraphing structure was not clear and sentences were not typically related within the paragraphs.
  18. 18. [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Intro Material: -”Today we will be learning about Jack London and the Alaskan Gold Rush.” Material: -”We will fist look at the history of the Alaskan Gold Rush. Who was the first person to discover gold in the Yukon? Well, we will find out now.” -Have students click on the link “Skookum Jim Mason” -”Now that we know who was the first to discover gold we must figure out a way for us to get to Alaska ourselves. Does anyone have any idea of a good way for us to get there? -Have students click on the link “Chilkoot Trail” -”Alright, now that we know how to get where we are going, we now need to see what types of supplies that we will need on our trip. Did you know that when miners went to Alaska, the Canadian border patrol made sure that all citizens had a certain amount of supplies? What do you think they made the miners take? -Have students click on the link “McDougal and Secord” - ”The next step we will complete is to look at what life was like in the Alaskan frontier. To do this we will look at two different sources. The first is a prose account of life and the second is a poem which describes life in Alaska.” -Have students click on the link “Dawson Creek” and “Robert Service” -”Next we will take a look at the biography of Jack London and we will then read a short story by him.” -Have students click on the link “Biography” and “Build a Fire” Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Process Continued
  19. 19. [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page You and your class have now finished a Webquest about Jack London and the Alaskan Gold Rush. This lesson should have developed a sense of contextual awareness in your students. They should now be able to read and assimilate contextual information into normal classroom discussions. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Process Continued
  20. 20. [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Photo Slide #1 Chilkoot Trail http://tinyurl.com/5upsaq Photo Slide #2 Gold http://tinyurl.com/5f8dor Photo Slide #3 Jack London http://tinyurl.com/58d9eb Photo Slide #4 Miner http://tinyurl.com/58kj53 Photo Slide #5 Poster http://tinyurl.com/6x7384 Photo Slide #6 Yukon gold comp http://tinyurl.com/58kj53 Process Continued

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