SMB Presentation on UR in MathBio

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Since 2004, Truman State University has trained students to conduct interdisciplinary research in mathematical biology through a combination of research experiences with faculty collaborators, courses, and field trips. This program of experiences for undergraduates has been made possible by the National Science Foundation’s Interdisciplinary Training for Undergraduates in Biology and Mathematics (UBM) program. This talk will outline our courses and our research program (including a portfolio-based interdisciplinary minor in mathematical biology), what we have learned about assessing interdisciplinary learning, and the role field trips have played in the professional development of faculty and students.

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  • Thank you for the kind introduction.

    I’m honored to be asked here to kick off the workshop by sharing my experiences
    this group is doing important work

    I hope sharing my experience will give you added insight into your work.
  • Outline of talk - will conclude with some conversation, advertise ‘panel’ discussion
  • Outline of talk - will conclude with some conversation, advertise ‘panel’ discussion
  • Outline of talk - will conclude with some conversation, advertise ‘panel’ discussion
  • Outline of talk - will conclude with some conversation, advertise ‘panel’ discussion
  • Outline of talk - will conclude with some conversation, advertise ‘panel’ discussion
  • Outline of talk - will conclude with some conversation, advertise ‘panel’ discussion
  • Outline of talk - will conclude with some conversation, advertise ‘panel’ discussion
  • Outline of talk - will conclude with some conversation, advertise ‘panel’ discussion
  • I want to continue this conversation, share information, make connections with you who are interested in doing this yourself…

    Will repeat this slide later, and I’ll put this slide deck on slideshare.
  • You are here.

    Truman is located in NE MO - rural location 200 mi from KC and STL.
  • Residential campus, beautiful place to work and study.
  • END: an intersection of coincidences led a group of mathematical science faculty to reach out to biology faculty as a source of expertise in UR

    feeding that interest: articles in professional society publications, Bio2010, and finally an NSF solicitation
  • END: an intersection of coincidences led a group of mathematical science faculty to reach out to biology faculty as a source of expertise in UR

    feeding that interest: articles in professional society publications, Bio2010, and finally an NSF solicitation
  • END: an intersection of coincidences led a group of mathematical science faculty to reach out to biology faculty as a source of expertise in UR

    feeding that interest: articles in professional society publications, Bio2010, and finally an NSF solicitation
  • Will describe the genesis of our program.

    you can do this too
  • Started with one pair of faculty and several glasses of wine.
  • In 2003, I took students to NCUR. Saw the quality of biology students’ work. Recognized that the ability of math folks to do UR with their students could be strengthened by learning from biologists. Note to self: how to do this?
  • At about that time, BIO 2010 was published.

    This notice of a new NSF program appeared, too, so we decided to go for it. We had a couple projects that appeared to fit the bill. We got it.
  • A mathbio seminar helped us grow the community, the effort. Foundation for 2004 UBM award, five-year. (Now known as an institutional award.)
  • A mathbio seminar helped us grow the community, the effort. Foundation for 2004 UBM award, five-year. (Now known as an institutional award.)
  • A mathbio seminar helped us grow the community, the effort. Foundation for 2004 UBM award, five-year. (Now known as an institutional award.)
  • A mathbio seminar helped us grow the community, the effort. Foundation for 2004 UBM award, five-year. (Now known as an institutional award.)
  • A mathbio seminar helped us grow the community, the effort. Foundation for 2004 UBM award, five-year. (Now known as an institutional award.)
  • What was our goal?

    On the one hand: training undergraduates to do graduate and professional work in mathematical biology (integrative work)

    On the other hand...
  • ...our goal was to get more of our colleagues on campus to adopt the idea that math+biol partnerships are important.
  • ...teaching through UR is the epitome of putting concepts before content - have concepts drive the acquisition of content in service of a larger goal

    also...learning through research can tap into students who struggle in the classroom
  • ...teaching through UR is the epitome of putting concepts before content - have concepts drive the acquisition of content in service of a larger goal

    also...learning through research can tap into students who struggle in the classroom
  • ...teaching through UR is the epitome of putting concepts before content - have concepts drive the acquisition of content in service of a larger goal

    also...learning through research can tap into students who struggle in the classroom
  • ...teaching through UR is the epitome of putting concepts before content - have concepts drive the acquisition of content in service of a larger goal

    also...learning through research can tap into students who struggle in the classroom
  • … large time burden initially, but that tails off as students take ownership of their project
  • … large time burden initially, but that tails off as students take ownership of their project
  • … large time burden initially, but that tails off as students take ownership of their project
  • … large time burden initially, but that tails off as students take ownership of their project
  • scientific enterprise:
    from reading primary literature,
    designing experiment,
    writing & presenting proposal,
    carrying out data collection,
    synthesizing/assessing,
    reporting,
    repeating

    student selection: competitive application process

    support from NSF: Interidisciplinary Training of Undergraduates in Biology and Mathematics (2003, 2004)
  • scientific enterprise:
    from reading primary literature,
    designing experiment,
    writing & presenting proposal,
    carrying out data collection,
    synthesizing/assessing,
    reporting,
    repeating

    student selection: competitive application process

    support from NSF: Interidisciplinary Training of Undergraduates in Biology and Mathematics (2003, 2004)
  • scientific enterprise:
    from reading primary literature,
    designing experiment,
    writing & presenting proposal,
    carrying out data collection,
    synthesizing/assessing,
    reporting,
    repeating

    student selection: competitive application process

    support from NSF: Interidisciplinary Training of Undergraduates in Biology and Mathematics (2003, 2004)
  • scientific enterprise:
    from reading primary literature,
    designing experiment,
    writing & presenting proposal,
    carrying out data collection,
    synthesizing/assessing,
    reporting,
    repeating

    student selection: competitive application process

    support from NSF: Interidisciplinary Training of Undergraduates in Biology and Mathematics (2003, 2004)
  • Faculty teams are tentatively identified in the spring so that, by mid-Fall, they are able to submit a research project description to be posted on our web site as part of our dissemination plans and recruitment efforts. All faculty recruit for the program and participate in student selection.

    We seek the best students we can possibly find. We advertise the program as highly competitive. Typically juniors or seniors are considered, but exceptional sophomores are considered, too.
    We open applications early enough in the Fall so that student can learn if they are accepted to the program by the time they register for Spring classes. (They are encouraged to have certain courses under their belts by the time the summer research program starts; faculty are often OK with students taking those courses concurrently with spring semester research work.) Students selected for the program start work in January by meeting with their team weekly, reading papers, attending the mathematical biology seminar, and so forth.
  • Faculty teams are tentatively identified in the spring so that, by mid-Fall, they are able to submit a research project description to be posted on our web site as part of our dissemination plans and recruitment efforts. All faculty recruit for the program and participate in student selection.

    We seek the best students we can possibly find. We advertise the program as highly competitive. Typically juniors or seniors are considered, but exceptional sophomores are considered, too.
    We open applications early enough in the Fall so that student can learn if they are accepted to the program by the time they register for Spring classes. (They are encouraged to have certain courses under their belts by the time the summer research program starts; faculty are often OK with students taking those courses concurrently with spring semester research work.) Students selected for the program start work in January by meeting with their team weekly, reading papers, attending the mathematical biology seminar, and so forth.
  • Faculty teams are tentatively identified in the spring so that, by mid-Fall, they are able to submit a research project description to be posted on our web site as part of our dissemination plans and recruitment efforts. All faculty recruit for the program and participate in student selection.

    We seek the best students we can possibly find. We advertise the program as highly competitive. Typically juniors or seniors are considered, but exceptional sophomores are considered, too.
    We open applications early enough in the Fall so that student can learn if they are accepted to the program by the time they register for Spring classes. (They are encouraged to have certain courses under their belts by the time the summer research program starts; faculty are often OK with students taking those courses concurrently with spring semester research work.) Students selected for the program start work in January by meeting with their team weekly, reading papers, attending the mathematical biology seminar, and so forth.
  • Faculty teams are tentatively identified in the spring so that, by mid-Fall, they are able to submit a research project description to be posted on our web site as part of our dissemination plans and recruitment efforts. All faculty recruit for the program and participate in student selection.

    We seek the best students we can possibly find. We advertise the program as highly competitive. Typically juniors or seniors are considered, but exceptional sophomores are considered, too.
    We open applications early enough in the Fall so that student can learn if they are accepted to the program by the time they register for Spring classes. (They are encouraged to have certain courses under their belts by the time the summer research program starts; faculty are often OK with students taking those courses concurrently with spring semester research work.) Students selected for the program start work in January by meeting with their team weekly, reading papers, attending the mathematical biology seminar, and so forth.
  • Faculty teams are tentatively identified in the spring so that, by mid-Fall, they are able to submit a research project description to be posted on our web site as part of our dissemination plans and recruitment efforts. All faculty recruit for the program and participate in student selection.

    We seek the best students we can possibly find. We advertise the program as highly competitive. Typically juniors or seniors are considered, but exceptional sophomores are considered, too.
    We open applications early enough in the Fall so that student can learn if they are accepted to the program by the time they register for Spring classes. (They are encouraged to have certain courses under their belts by the time the summer research program starts; faculty are often OK with students taking those courses concurrently with spring semester research work.) Students selected for the program start work in January by meeting with their team weekly, reading papers, attending the mathematical biology seminar, and so forth.
  • Faculty teams are tentatively identified in the spring so that, by mid-Fall, they are able to submit a research project description to be posted on our web site as part of our dissemination plans and recruitment efforts. All faculty recruit for the program and participate in student selection.

    We seek the best students we can possibly find. We advertise the program as highly competitive. Typically juniors or seniors are considered, but exceptional sophomores are considered, too.
    We open applications early enough in the Fall so that student can learn if they are accepted to the program by the time they register for Spring classes. (They are encouraged to have certain courses under their belts by the time the summer research program starts; faculty are often OK with students taking those courses concurrently with spring semester research work.) Students selected for the program start work in January by meeting with their team weekly, reading papers, attending the mathematical biology seminar, and so forth.
  • SMB Presentation on UR in MathBio

    1. 1. Training Undergraduates in Mathematical Biology Using Research with Faculty Jason Miller, Ph.D. Department of Mathematics Truman State University SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    2. 2. Outline SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    3. 3. Outline • Context & Truman State University SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    4. 4. Outline • Context & Truman State University • Why research? SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    5. 5. Outline • Context & Truman State University • Why research? • overview of Truman’s interdisciplinary, undergraduate mathematical biology program SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    6. 6. Outline • Context & Truman State University • Why research? • overview of Truman’s interdisciplinary, undergraduate mathematical biology program • the research experiences (NSF UBM) SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    7. 7. Outline • Context & Truman State University • Why research? • overview of Truman’s interdisciplinary, undergraduate mathematical biology program • the research experiences (NSF UBM) • the courses SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    8. 8. Outline • Context & Truman State University • Why research? • overview of Truman’s interdisciplinary, undergraduate mathematical biology program • the research experiences (NSF UBM) • the courses • program’s impact SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    9. 9. Outline • Context & Truman State University • Why research? • overview of Truman’s interdisciplinary, undergraduate mathematical biology program • the research experiences (NSF UBM) • the courses • program’s impact • program challenges, national needs SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    10. 10. Outline • Context & Truman State University • Why research? • overview of Truman’s interdisciplinary, undergraduate mathematical biology program • the research experiences (NSF UBM) • the courses • program’s impact • program challenges, national needs • start & continue conversation SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    11. 11. Contact Info • Email: millerj@truman.edu • Twitter: @hatchethead • FriendFeed: @hatchethead • LinkedIn: jasonearlmiller • Facebook: jasonemiller • SlideShare: millerj870 • Web: http://pyrite.truman.edu/~millerj/ SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    12. 12. Context SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    13. 13. SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    14. 14. JMM, 6 January 2009 Washington, D.C.
    15. 15. About Truman SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    16. 16. About Truman • Missouri’s only “highly selective” public liberal arts University; teaching-centered, small class size SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    17. 17. About Truman • Missouri’s only “highly selective” public liberal arts University; teaching-centered, small class size • ~5800 undergraduates, ~300 faculty, 150 Masters students SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    18. 18. About Truman • Missouri’s only “highly selective” public liberal arts University; teaching-centered, small class size • ~5800 undergraduates, ~300 faculty, 150 Masters students • Institutional commitment to Undergraduate Research and to Interdisciplinary teaching SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    19. 19. About Truman • Missouri’s only “highly selective” public liberal arts University; teaching-centered, small class size • ~5800 undergraduates, ~300 faculty, 150 Masters students • Institutional commitment to Undergraduate Research and to Interdisciplinary teaching • EX: all students must take a Junior Interdisciplinary Seminar SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    20. 20. About Truman SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    21. 21. About Truman • about 25 biology faculty, 40 mathematics faculty (math+stats+CS) SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    22. 22. About Truman • about 25 biology faculty, 40 mathematics faculty (math+stats+CS) • biology: research expected of faculty (with students); experienced mentors SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    23. 23. About Truman • about 25 biology faculty, 40 mathematics faculty (math+stats+CS) • biology: research expected of faculty (with students); experienced mentors • mathematics: teaching focus, little or no support for research activity; 10 new faculty between 1998-2000 SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    24. 24. Our Program SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    25. 25. Conception SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    26. 26. SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    27. 27. SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    28. 28. SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    29. 29. SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    30. 30. Mathematical Biology Seminar Series SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    31. 31. Mathematical Biology Seminar Series • Fulcrum for program SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    32. 32. Mathematical Biology Seminar Series • Fulcrum for program • Biweekly meeting of faculty and undergraduates SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    33. 33. Mathematical Biology Seminar Series • Fulcrum for program • Biweekly meeting of faculty and undergraduates • Initially = “Biology Fashion Show” SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    34. 34. Mathematical Biology Seminar Series • Fulcrum for program • Biweekly meeting of faculty and undergraduates • Initially = “Biology Fashion Show” • Leads to cross-disciplinary, research hook-ups SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    35. 35. Mathematical Biology Seminar Series • Fulcrum for program • Biweekly meeting of faculty and undergraduates • Initially = “Biology Fashion Show” • Leads to cross-disciplinary, research hook-ups • Pairings provide us with foundation for NSF UBM research teams SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    36. 36. SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    37. 37. Innovation Adoption (Diffusion of Innovation, Everett Rogers, 1962) 0.2 0.15 Innovators 0.1 Early Majority Late Majority 0.05 Early Adopters Laggards 0 Distribution of Adoptors SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    38. 38. Why Research? http://www.cur.org/ SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    39. 39. Why Research? http://www.cur.org/ SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    40. 40. SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    41. 41. • cantaught in a class be teach things through research that can’t SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    42. 42. • cantaught in a class be teach things through research that can’t • researchway for a research-active faculty efficient with undergrad is not always an member to work SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    43. 43. • cantaught in a class be teach things through research that can’t • researchway for a research-active faculty efficient with undergrad is not always an member to work • done well, research is a transformative experience for students (e.g. self- understanding, career options) SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    44. 44. • cantaught in a class be teach things through research that can’t • researchway for a research-active faculty efficient with undergrad is not always an member to work • done well, research is a transformative experience for students (e.g. self- understanding, career options) • done well, research is a transformative experience for faculty SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    45. 45. UR Done Well? SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    46. 46. UR Done Well? • Hours and hours of weekly student/mentor interaction & collaboration SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    47. 47. UR Done Well? • Hours and hours of weekly student/mentor interaction & collaboration • students develop strong sense of project ownership and investment SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    48. 48. UR Done Well? • Hours and hours of weekly student/mentor interaction & collaboration • students develop strong sense of project ownership and investment • interdisciplinary team? students leverage disciplinary strengths, but also work immerse themselves in their partner’s discipline SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    49. 49. UR Done Well? • Hours and hours of weekly student/mentor interaction & collaboration • students develop strong sense of project ownership and investment • interdisciplinary team? students leverage disciplinary strengths, but also work immerse themselves in their partner’s discipline • students communicate (posters, formal and informal oral and written reports) SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    50. 50. Overview of Truman’s Mathematical Biology Program SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    51. 51. Overview of Truman’s Mathematical Biology Program SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    52. 52. Overview of Truman’s Mathematical Biology Program • learning through research SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    53. 53. Overview of Truman’s Mathematical Biology Program • learning through research • use faculty-mentored interdisciplinary research projects as pedagogical vehicle SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    54. 54. Overview of Truman’s Mathematical Biology Program • learning through research • use faculty-mentored interdisciplinary research projects as pedagogical vehicle • undergraduates are collaborators (interdisciplinary quartets) SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    55. 55. Overview of Truman’s Mathematical Biology Program • learning through research • use faculty-mentored interdisciplinary research projects as pedagogical vehicle • undergraduates are collaborators (interdisciplinary quartets) • projects are long-term (12mos.) so that students engage in the whole range of scientific experiences SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    56. 56. Program Goals SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    57. 57. Program Goals • we’re not taking biology majors and turning them into mathematics majors SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    58. 58. Program Goals • we’re not taking biology majors and turning them into mathematics majors • we’re not taking mathematics majors and turing them into biology majors SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    59. 59. Program Goals • we’re not taking biology majors and turning them into mathematics majors • we’re not taking mathematics majors and turing them into biology majors • we are bringing students to a place where they can confidently and creatively interact across disciplinary boundaries SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    60. 60. Program Goals • we’re not taking biology majors and turning them into mathematics majors • we’re not taking mathematics majors and turing them into biology majors • we are bringing students to a place where they can confidently and creatively interact across disciplinary boundaries • create and sustain a learning-community with mathematical biology as a common interest SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    61. 61. Research Teams SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    62. 62. Research Teams • each team has: SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    63. 63. Research Teams • each team has: • two faculty SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    64. 64. Research Teams • each team has: • two faculty • two students SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    65. 65. Research Teams • each team has: • two faculty • two students • each teams receives stipends, supply budget and travel allowance SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    66. 66. Research Teams • each team has: • two faculty • two students • each teams receives stipends, supply budget and travel allowance • year-long experience (academic year + 10-week summer) SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    67. 67. Research Teams • each team has: • two faculty • two students • each teams receives stipends, supply budget and travel allowance • year-long experience (academic year + 10-week summer) January Summer December SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    68. 68. Research Teams SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    69. 69. Research Teams • selection occurs in the Fall, students start work in January (year-long) SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    70. 70. Research Teams • selection occurs in the Fall, students start work in January (year-long) • weekly meetings during the academic year SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    71. 71. Research Teams • selection occurs in the Fall, students start work in January (year-long) • weekly meetings during the academic year • intense 9+-week summer research program SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    72. 72. Our Courses SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    73. 73. • Biostatistics • Bioinformatics • Introduction to Mathematical Biology • audience=mix of math+biol+cs • project-based, requires teamwork • ‘Intro’ is team-taught • each ‘counts’ toward math/bio/cs major SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    74. 74. SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    75. 75. SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    76. 76. SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    77. 77. Innovation Adoption (Diffusion of Innovation, Everett Rogers, 1962) 0.2 0.15 0.1 0.05 0 Distribution of Adoptors SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    78. 78. Innovation Adoption (Diffusion of Innovation, Everett Rogers, 1962) 0.2 0.15 Innovators 0.1 0.05 0 Distribution of Adoptors SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    79. 79. Innovation Adoption (Diffusion of Innovation, Everett Rogers, 1962) 0.2 0.15 Innovators 0.1 0.05 Early Adopters 0 Distribution of Adoptors SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    80. 80. Innovation Adoption (Diffusion of Innovation, Everett Rogers, 1962) 0.2 0.15 Innovators 0.1 Early Majority 0.05 Early Adopters 0 Distribution of Adoptors SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    81. 81. Innovation Adoption (Diffusion of Innovation, Everett Rogers, 1962) 0.2 0.15 Innovators 0.1 Early Majority Late Majority 0.05 Early Adopters 0 Distribution of Adoptors SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    82. 82. Innovation Adoption (Diffusion of Innovation, Everett Rogers, 1962) 0.2 0.15 Innovators 0.1 Early Majority Late Majority 0.05 Early Adopters Laggards 0 Distribution of Adoptors SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    83. 83. Program Impact SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    84. 84. SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    85. 85. SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    86. 86. Donald Danforth Plant Science Center Wolfram Research SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    87. 87. Interdisciplinary Minor JMM, 6 January 2009 Washington, D.C.
    88. 88. Interdisciplinary Minor • Designed to foster thoughtful integration of skills and knowledge in mathematics and biology JMM, 6 January 2009 Washington, D.C.
    89. 89. Interdisciplinary Minor • Designed to foster thoughtful integration of skills and knowledge in mathematics and biology • outcome based (electronic portfolio), not course/credit based JMM, 6 January 2009 Washington, D.C.
    90. 90. Interdisciplinary Minor • Designed to foster thoughtful integration of skills and knowledge in mathematics and biology • outcome based (electronic portfolio), not course/credit based • for majors in biology, mathematics, computer science, agricultural science JMM, 6 January 2009 Washington, D.C.
    91. 91. Minor’s Outcomes JMM, 6 January 2009 Washington, D.C.
    92. 92. Minor’s Outcomes • Data Acquisition JMM, 6 January 2009 Washington, D.C.
    93. 93. Minor’s Outcomes • Data Acquisition • Modeling JMM, 6 January 2009 Washington, D.C.
    94. 94. Minor’s Outcomes • Data Acquisition • Modeling • Computation JMM, 6 January 2009 Washington, D.C.
    95. 95. Minor’s Outcomes • Data Acquisition • Modeling • Computation • Statistics JMM, 6 January 2009 Washington, D.C.
    96. 96. Minor’s Outcomes • Data Acquisition • Modeling • Computation • Statistics • Research JMM, 6 January 2009 Washington, D.C.
    97. 97. Requirements JMM, 6 January 2009 Washington, D.C.
    98. 98. Requirements • Demonstrate proficiencies in each category (though research, courses) JMM, 6 January 2009 Washington, D.C.
    99. 99. Requirements • Demonstrate proficiencies in each category (though research, courses) • Earn 15+ credits doing so (must take Intro to MathBio) JMM, 6 January 2009 Washington, D.C.
    100. 100. Requirements • Demonstrate proficiencies in each category (though research, courses) • Earn 15+ credits doing so (must take Intro to MathBio) • Attend MathBio Seminar JMM, 6 January 2009 Washington, D.C.
    101. 101. Requirements • Demonstrate proficiencies in each category (though research, courses) • Earn 15+ credits doing so (must take Intro to MathBio) • Attend MathBio Seminar • Participate in two half-semester program workshops/seminars JMM, 6 January 2009 Washington, D.C.
    102. 102. JMM, 6 January 2009 Washington, D.C.
    103. 103. JMM, 6 January 2009 Washington, D.C.
    104. 104. JMM, 6 January 2009 Washington, D.C.
    105. 105. Summary SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    106. 106. Summary • Program grew from institutional strengths and interests, meeting the needs of many SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    107. 107. Summary • Program grew from institutional strengths and interests, meeting the needs of many • Creates a learning-centered community for faculty and students SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    108. 108. Summary • Program grew from institutional strengths and interests, meeting the needs of many • Creates a learning-centered community for faculty and students • Trains students through research; discomfort is a sign of success SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    109. 109. Summary • Program grew from institutional strengths and interests, meeting the needs of many • Creates a learning-centered community for faculty and students • Trains students through research; discomfort is a sign of success • We have evidence of success. SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    110. 110. Other Issues SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    111. 111. Other Issues • Assessing our work (interdisciplinary training) • Increasing STEM undergraduate degree production • Increasing participation of traditionally underrepresented groups • Involve pre-K thru 12 and community college teachers to move forward on the adoption curve SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    112. 112. Increasing STEM production SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    113. 113. Increasing STEM production • Is undergraduate degree production in STEM keeping pace with national needs? SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    114. 114. Increasing STEM production • Is undergraduate degree production in STEM keeping pace with national needs? • Probably not. SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    115. 115. Increasing STEM production • Is undergraduate degree production in STEM keeping pace with national needs? • Probably not. • Quantitative & Mathematical Biology are uniquely positioned to attract students to science and mathematics SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    116. 116. Social Relevance public health stem cells disease control genetic engineering bio-warfare performance bio-technology enhancement bio-inspired science human and non-human robotics learning enhancement (Chris Arney, USMA) SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    117. 117. Social Relevance • With quantitative techniques, students can contribute to understanding serious social issues public health stem cells disease control genetic engineering bio-warfare performance bio-technology enhancement bio-inspired science human and non-human robotics learning enhancement (Chris Arney, USMA) SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    118. 118. Energy storing prosthetic knee for above knee amputees, prosthetic, amputee prosthesis, 07/16/2007 09:58 PM | How The XT9 ESPK Works | Pros & Cons | Important Information! | Thank you for visiting SYMBIOTECHS USA The XT9 Energy Storing Prosthetic Knee is the only prosthetic knee device for highly active amputees, designed to mimic the functions of the quadriceps during intense athletic and extreme sports use by athletic amputees! __________________________ The XT9 Energy Storing Prosthetic Knee (ESPK) for high activity above the knee amputees, is the first prosthesis designed to enable AK amputees to enjoy extreme sports at and an active life at the top level. Thanks to an aerospace grade, light weight knee frame and other space age materials and components, the XT9 prosthetic limb can withstand the forces generated in extreme sports activities by even the most active amputees. Many sports were once impossible for Above Knee (AK) amputees because of limitations with their prosthetics. The XT9 prosthetic knee has overcome those limitations for amputees involved in extreme sports and active lifestyles. Thanks to this new prosthetic device, sports like snowboarding are now possible for AK amputees around the world! The dynamic functions of the XT9 knee make it the only prosthetic limb that mimics real knee functions for all boarding activities. http://www.symbiotechsusa.com/ Page 1 of 2 SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    119. 119. http://mathbio.truman.edu This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under NSF UBM #0337769 and NSF UBM #0436348. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation. JMM, 6 January 2009 Washington, D.C.
    120. 120. Continue the Conversation • Email: millerj@truman.edu • LinkedIn: jasonearlmiller • Twitter: @hatchethead • Facebook: jasonemiller (search #mathbio) • Web: • FriendFeed: @hatchethead http://pyrite.truman.edu/ ~millerj/ (search #mathbio) SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    121. 121. Continue the Conversation • Email: millerj@truman.edu • LinkedIn: jasonearlmiller • Twitter: @hatchethead • Facebook: jasonemiller io (search #mathbio) • hb Web: • at FriendFeed: http://pyrite.truman.edu/ #m @hatchethead ~millerj/ (search #mathbio) SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    122. 122. Continue the Conversation • Email: millerj@truman.edu • LinkedIn: jasonearlmiller • Twitter: @hatchethead • Facebook: jasonemiller io (search #mathbio) • hb Web: • at FriendFeed: http://pyrite.truman.edu/ #m @hatchethead ~millerj/ (search #mathbio) SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    123. 123. Continue the Conversation • Email: millerj@truman.edu • LinkedIn: jasonearlmiller • Twitter: @hatchethead • Facebook: jasonemiller io (search #mathbio) • hb Web: • at FriendFeed: http://pyrite.truman.edu/ #m @hatchethead ~millerj/ (search #mathbio) Resources SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    124. 124. Continue the Conversation • Email: millerj@truman.edu • LinkedIn: jasonearlmiller • Twitter: @hatchethead • Facebook: jasonemiller io (search #mathbio) • hb Web: • at FriendFeed: http://pyrite.truman.edu/ #m @hatchethead ~millerj/ (search #mathbio) Resources Council on Undergraduate National Digital Science Library Research (CUR) National Institute for MAA’s SIGMAA for Mathematical and Biological Mathematical and Synthesis (NIMBioS) Computational Biology Mathematical Biosicences Merlot Institute (MBI) SMB Education Committee National Conferences on BioQuest Consoritum Undergraduate Research SMB 2009, Vancouver,
    125. 125. http://mathbio.truman.edu This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under NSF UBM #0337769 and NSF UBM #0436348. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation. JMM, 6 January 2009 Washington, D.C.

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