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How the public sector can better communicate change and technology disruption to citizens

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This is a talk I delivered at the 2018 FWD50 conference.

I wanted to introduce government attendees to the role social marketing (not to be confused with social media marketing) can play in communicating tech disruption. The official description was as follows:

"Your role as communications and policy professionals in the public sector is growing with the need to improve transparency and accessibility, promote new and expanded digital services, safeguard reputation, and maintain public confidence. This session will explore the current state of global trust in technology and provide participants with possible approaches towards better communicating the value and importance of change and technology disruption, especially if it can lead to improved service delivery. Participants will be introduced to a social marketing / behaviour change framework, which aims to move beyond “awareness building” and into attitude and behaviour change".

Published in: Government & Nonprofit
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How the public sector can better communicate change and technology disruption to citizens

  1. 1. @mikekujawski | CEPSM.caFWD50 - 2018 Communicating change and tech disruption to citizens Tips on moving beyond “awareness building” and into actual behaviour change
  2. 2. Managing Partner & Senior Consultant Centre of Excellence for Public Sector Marketing (CEPSM.ca) Niche: Only work with public sector and non-profit organizations Specialty Areas: Digital marketing, social marketing and behaviour change communication, organizational/personal branding, digital media literacy, user- centered design, social network analysis, open source social media intelligence Sample Clients: Elections Canada, Office of the Auditor General, United Nations, Justice Canada, Government of Tanzania, Government of Kazakhstan, Government of Singapore, Government of Sharjah I help public sector organizations around the globe adapt to digital disruption and improve their strategic marketing, communications, and service delivery efforts. What exactly do I do?
  3. 3. LOOKING BACK AT THE PAST DECADE, HOW WOULD YOU RATE YOUR OWN GOVERNMENT IN TERMS OF COMMUNICATING THE IMPLICATIONS OF DIGITAL DISRUPTION TO CITIZENS?
  4. 4. WHAT HAS CHANGED AND WHERE ARE WE NOW?
  5. 5. 54% (4.2 billion) of the global population has internet access
  6. 6. 40% (3 billion) of the global population uses a smartphone * Equal to 72% of all internet users
  7. 7. 40% (3 billion) of the global population uses some form of social media * Equal to 72% of all internet users
  8. 8. Global Facebook Penetration Alone (2018): 30% Global Landline Penetration At Its Peak (2004): 20% FUN FACT
  9. 9. OF COURSE, ALL OF THIS CONNECTIVITY AND DEMOCRATIZATION OF CONTENT HAS CREATED NEW CHALLENGES.
  10. 10. No More Filters
  11. 11. Information Disorder and False Balance
  12. 12. Editorial Absenteeism
  13. 13. Permanent Personal Digital Footprints
  14. 14. Mental Health Issues and the Growing “Insta Lie” Culture “Insta lie”: an intentionally false representation of real life on social media.
  15. 15. Polarization of Society
  16. 16. HOW HAVE BOTH THE PRIVATE SECTOR AND GOVERNMENT RESPONDED TO DATE?
  17. 17. hansonrobotics.com/robot/sophia/
  18. 18. bostondynamics.com/atlas
  19. 19. your.md
  20. 20. tesla.com/en_CA/models
  21. 21. goo.gl/gWjDE5 (full video is NSFW)
  22. 22. SO WHAT ARE SOME WAYS IN WHICH GOVERNMENT COMMUNICATORS CAN APPROACH ALL OF THIS?
  23. 23. LET’S GO BACK TO THE BASICS FOR A MOMENT
  24. 24. The Brand Gap by Marty Neumeier MARKETING ADVERTISING PUBLIC RELATIONS BRANDING
  25. 25. The strategic planning process for creating, communicating, delivering, and exchanging offerings that have value for your audience. Marketing WANTS AUDIENCES TO ACT
  26. 26. The execution of the messaging element of marketing. Also used to create and strengthen relationships inside and outside the organization. Communications WANTS AUDIENCES TO LISTEN
  27. 27. Goal setting Research Segmentation Targeting Positioning Product/Service Price/Opportunity Cost Place/Channel Promotion/Tactics & Messaging 40 This should ideally come after the strategic marketing “planning” elements. Sadly, it often happens first. Often based only on outputs instead of outcomes The “General Public” is not a target audience! Common Pitfalls in the Government “Marketing” Process Seen as a completely separate division, often excluded from the process. Often skipped. No clear differentiation conveyed. The brand is seen as the logo instead of something to be “lived out” Service delivery and product quality not seen as being part of “marketing”
  28. 28. WHAT IS SOCIAL MARKETING*? *not to be confused with “social media marketing”
  29. 29. SOCIAL POLICY SOCIAL SCIENCE COMMERCIAL MARKETING PUBLIC SECTOR MARKETING
  30. 30. A process that applies marketing principles and techniques to create, communicate, and deliver value in order to influence target audience behaviors that benefit society as well as the target audience*. *based on the best available scientific evidence and with genuine selfless intent
  31. 31. Health Belief Model Theory of Planned Behaviour Social Cognitive Theory Transtheoretical Model (Stages of Change) Social Norms Theory Theory of Reasoned Action Fogg Behaviour Model Diffusion of Innovation Theory
  32. 32. Key Components of Social Marketing Should have a long term outlook based on continuing programs rather than one-off initiatives (3-5 years). Should be strategic rather than tactical Should focus on aggressive listening rather than aggressive promotion Research should be conducted throughout to inform the development of the strategy Should bring about changes in the social and structural factors that impinge on an individual’s opportunities, capacities, and right to a healthy and fulfilling life Should involve upstream targeting of individuals/groups who have the power to make policy, regulatory and legislative changes that protect and enhance people’s quality of life
  33. 33. A FEW NOTEWORTHY DIFFERENCES BETWEEN COMMERCIAL AND SOCIAL MARKETING
  34. 34. Has three main categories of outcome objectives Knowledge objectives: based on statistics that could motivate the target audience. Audience should know benefits of proposed behaviour and the available tools to help them Belief objectives: tied to attitudes, opinions, or feelings held by audience. Must believe they are capable of performing the desired behaviour and that it will produce desired results Behaviour objectives: simple clear and doable actions
  35. 35. Uses various evidence-based forms of psychographic segmentation techniques Transtheoretical Model - Prochaska and DiClemente
  36. 36. “I have to be the first to try this” “I want to show you this helpful tool I found” “Why should I start using this technology?” “I was skeptical at first, but I definitely should have tried this earlier” “I guess I can give it a try but I need help” Diffusion of Innovation Theory – Everett Rogers
  37. 37. T Total number of people in the segment Segments encompassing larger groups of individuals are more attractive AR Proportion of At Risk persons in the segment Segments at higher levels of risk should be given priority P Persuadability of the segment A segment that is easily persuaded to take the desired action (low hanging fruit) should be given higher priority A Accessibility of the segment Target audiences that are easier to reach are more attractive as less work will be needed to make an impact R Resources required to meet the needs of the segment The fewer resources required to meet the needs of the segment, the greater the expected return on investment E Equity, social justice considerations The need to target specific disadvantaged segments TARPARE – A method for selecting target audiences -RJ Donovan, 1999
  38. 38. The “product” has three distinct components Actual product: the specific behaviour that is being promoted Augmented product: the tangible objects and services offered to support behaviour change Core product: the benefits the target audience will experience when they perform the behaviour
  39. 39. Positioning acknowledges competing behaviours “I want my target audience to see______ (desired behaviour) as ______ (a phrase describing positive benefits of adopting the behaviour) and as more important and/or beneficial than______ (the competing behaviour)”.
  40. 40. Assume that your government wants to get citizens more comfortable with using AI driven chatbots as part of its service delivery. 1. Create sample knowledge, belief, and behaviour objectives 2. State potential actual, augmented, and core products. 3. Formulate your positioning using the provided template Quick Activity
  41. 41. “I want my target audience to see______ (desired behaviour) as ______ (a phrase describing positive benefits of adopting the behaviour) and as more important and/or beneficial than______ (the competing behaviour)”. Actual product: the specific behaviour that is being promoted Augmented product: the tangible objects and services offered to support behaviour change Core product: the benefits the target audience will experience when they perform the behaviour Knowledge objectives: based on statistics that could motivate the target audience. Audience should know benefits of proposed behaviour and the available tools to help them Belief objectives: tied to attitudes, opinions, or feelings held by audience. Must believe they are capable of performing the desired behaviour and that it will produce desired results Behaviour objectives: simple clear and doable actions Activity Cheat Sheet 1 2 3
  42. 42. FINAL TIPS
  43. 43. Avoid short-term “campaign”- based output thinking. Social marketing is a long-term outcome based process.
  44. 44. Ensure that you spend the bulk of your initiative’s time researching and understanding what audiences perceive as barriers to change.
  45. 45. Use decisions regarding the core, actual and augmented products to determine positioning and drive your messaging.
  46. 46. TRUSTTrue social marketing is a powerful process that should be selfless and have the best interests of the audience in mind. There is a tremendous opportunity for government to build trust by being more open and transparent about what behaviours it is trying to influence and why. We have so many “open” initiatives, why not begin to have more “open marketing/communications” initiatives by sharing the research, strategies and results behind them? Above all else, work on building
  47. 47. Mike Kujawski Mobile: 613.899.1348 E-mail: mikekujawski@cepsm.ca LinkedIn: “Mike Kujawski” Twitter: @mikekujawski Skype: mikekujawski Blog: mikekujawski.ca Website: cepsm.ca

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