The Role of Judges in Criminal Law<br />Image via insidesocal.com<br />
	Judges must interpret laws passed by Parliament or by the provincial Legislatures and decide how to apply the law to a sp...
	Judges have the power to decide whether a law is consistent with the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. If the law ...
Types of Criminal Offences<br />Image via insidesocal.comjvaudio.vox.com <br />
Types of Criminal Offences<br />There are three types of criminal offences:<br />1- Summary Conviction Offences<br />2- In...
Types of Criminal Offences<br />The type of offence determines:<br />1- The power of arrest for a citizen or police<br />2...
Summary Conviction Offences<br />These are minor offences for which an accused can be arrested or summoned to court withou...
Summary Conviction Offences<br />Maximum penalty for most summary offences is $2000 and/or 6 month is jail.<br />
Summary Conviction Offences<br />In the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act, the maximum penalty for a summary offence is ...
All provincial quasi criminal offences are summary offences. <br />Provincial penalties vary from small fines to imprisonm...
The accused may send a representative to trial instead of appearing personally although a judge may require the accused to...
For some quasi-criminal offences, the accused can plead guilty by signing the guilty plea on the ticket. If the accused wa...
Examples: communicating for the purpose of obtaining the sexual services of a prostitute, causing a disturbance, and haras...
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Montmartre Collab ppt 2

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Montmartre Collab ppt 2

  1. 1. The Role of Judges in Criminal Law<br />Image via insidesocal.com<br />
  2. 2. Judges must interpret laws passed by Parliament or by the provincial Legislatures and decide how to apply the law to a specific case before the court.<br />The Role of Judges in Criminal Law<br />Image via insidesocal.com<br />
  3. 3. Judges have the power to decide whether a law is consistent with the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. If the law is not consistent, the judge has the power to strike down the law<br />The Role of Judges in Criminal Law<br />Image via insidesocal.com<br />
  4. 4. Types of Criminal Offences<br />Image via insidesocal.comjvaudio.vox.com <br />
  5. 5. Types of Criminal Offences<br />There are three types of criminal offences:<br />1- Summary Conviction Offences<br />2- Indictable Offences<br />3- Hybrid or Dual Procedure Offences<br />
  6. 6. Types of Criminal Offences<br />The type of offence determines:<br />1- The power of arrest for a citizen or police<br />2- The rights of the accused<br />3- How the trial will proceed<br />4- What penalty will be imposed<br />
  7. 7. Summary Conviction Offences<br />These are minor offences for which an accused can be arrested or summoned to court without delay.<br />
  8. 8. Summary Conviction Offences<br />Maximum penalty for most summary offences is $2000 and/or 6 month is jail.<br />
  9. 9. Summary Conviction Offences<br />In the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act, the maximum penalty for a summary offence is $2000 and/or 1 year in jail.<br />
  10. 10. All provincial quasi criminal offences are summary offences. <br />Provincial penalties vary from small fines to imprisonment.<br />There is a 6 month limitation period for the laying of a charge for a summary offence.<br />Summary Conviction Offences<br />
  11. 11. The accused may send a representative to trial instead of appearing personally although a judge may require the accused to appear in person.<br />Summary Conviction Offences<br />
  12. 12. For some quasi-criminal offences, the accused can plead guilty by signing the guilty plea on the ticket. If the accused wants to plead not guilty they must appear in person.<br />Summary Conviction Offences<br />
  13. 13. Examples: communicating for the purpose of obtaining the sexual services of a prostitute, causing a disturbance, and harassing telephone calls.<br />Summary Conviction Offences<br />

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