Successfully reported this slideshow.
Your SlideShare is downloading. ×

Thinking Differently – Enabling Innovation

Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Loading in …3
×

Check these out next

1 of 27 Ad

Thinking Differently – Enabling Innovation

www.create-learning.com
Thinking Differently – Enabling Innovation

Competitive demands require quicker, more effective and innovative problem solving. Problem solvers are required to quickly provide solutions to increasingly complex problems, develop and design new and innovative products and processes – all while reducing research and development time and costs.

Creative thinking is a critical skill required by all people within their roles at work, yet it is generally done by trial and error – the thinker creates an idea and determines if it will work – which is basically guessing. Not only is trial and error limited by personal knowledge, it can take many ideas and a long time, sometimes years to identify a good idea and thinking is constrained by a “stuckness” in how things are and how things should be.

Outcomes from Thinking Differently – Enabling Innovation
• Learn ways to overcome “stuckness” in your thinking and quickly solve problems.
• How to have discussions to lead others to think differently
• Model’s and methods to think differently about existing problems that will lead to innovative products and processes
• Use existing resources and knowledge to innovate solutions

www.create-learning.com
Thinking Differently – Enabling Innovation

Competitive demands require quicker, more effective and innovative problem solving. Problem solvers are required to quickly provide solutions to increasingly complex problems, develop and design new and innovative products and processes – all while reducing research and development time and costs.

Creative thinking is a critical skill required by all people within their roles at work, yet it is generally done by trial and error – the thinker creates an idea and determines if it will work – which is basically guessing. Not only is trial and error limited by personal knowledge, it can take many ideas and a long time, sometimes years to identify a good idea and thinking is constrained by a “stuckness” in how things are and how things should be.

Outcomes from Thinking Differently – Enabling Innovation
• Learn ways to overcome “stuckness” in your thinking and quickly solve problems.
• How to have discussions to lead others to think differently
• Model’s and methods to think differently about existing problems that will lead to innovative products and processes
• Use existing resources and knowledge to innovate solutions

Advertisement
Advertisement

More Related Content

More from Mike Cardus (20)

Advertisement

Recently uploaded (20)

Thinking Differently – Enabling Innovation

  1. 1. “…the ability of your company to be competitive & survive lies in the capability of the people in your organization to understand a situation and develop solutions.” www.create-learning.com
  2. 2. www.create-learning.com
  3. 3. Quick TRIZ: Theory of inventive problem solving. • Created in 1940 by G.S Altschuller • Initially reviewed ~200,000 patents to understand how inventive solutions are created. To date over 3 million have been reviewed and the original results have stayed essentially the same. www.create-learning.com
  4. 4. 5 Levels of Inventiveness: Altschuller determined 5 levels with level 1 being basic and level 5 being highly innovative patents that required new technology. Levels only indicate how difficult a problem is to solve, higher levels requiring more knowledge from outside sources; truly outside-the-box. Trials = estimation of the number of trials it may take to obtain a solution using trail and error. Level 1 = 32% of patents; Less than 10 trials. • Example: Narrow hull the ship is unstable. Solution: use a wider hull. Level 1 does not change the system substantially. Level 2 = 45% of patents; up to 100 trials. • Not well known within the industry or technology. No need from knowledge outside of the industry and requires creative thinking for the solution. Level 3 = 18% of patents; up to 1000 trials. • Significant improvements are made to an existing system. The solution requires using engineering knowledge from other industries and technology. • Example: An electric field is used to move boxes rather than rollers. Contradiction: If I push the boxes, then they move but the boxes wear out. Solution: magnetic levitation. Level 4 = 4% of patents; up to 10,000 trials. • Solution uses science that is new to that industry or technology. Usually involves a radical new principle of operation. • Example: A sniper needs a bigger and bigger lens to accurately hit his target. Solution: use a laser sight to provide accurate location. Level 5 = Less than 1%; over 10 million trials. • Solutions involve discoveries of new scientific phenomena or a new scientific discovery. www.create-learning.com
  5. 5. Image http://www.flickr.com/photos/speednutdave/2839923659/ www.create-learning.com
  6. 6. TRIZ tools can work to release Psychological Inertia AKA Mental / Organizational Stuckness www.create-learning.com
  7. 7. “That is how we have always done it.” “We tried that like 10 years ago and it didn’t work” “I am not paid to improve things, just to push this button” “That will never work here.” www.create-learning.com
  8. 8. PSYCHOLOGICAL INERTIA.PSYCHOLOGICAL INERTIA. The psychological meaning of the wordThe psychological meaning of the word "inertia" implies an indisposition to"inertia" implies an indisposition to change – a certain "stuckness" due tochange – a certain "stuckness" due to human programming. It represents thehuman programming. It represents the inevitability of behaving in a certain wayinevitability of behaving in a certain way – the way that has been indelibly– the way that has been indelibly inscribed somewhere in the brain. Itinscribed somewhere in the brain. It also represents the impossibility – asalso represents the impossibility – as long as a person is guided by his habitslong as a person is guided by his habits – of ever behaving in a better way.– of ever behaving in a better way. –– KowalickKowalick www.create-learning.com
  9. 9. Routine causes of psychological inertia; Having a fixed vision (or model) of the solution or root cause. False assumptions (trusting the data). Language that is a strong carrier of psychological inertia. Specific terminology carries psychological inertia. Experience, expertise and reliance upon previous results. Limited knowledge, hidden resources or mechanisms. Inflexibility (model worship; trying to prove a specific theory, stubbornness). Using the same strategy. Keep thinking the same way and you will continue to get the same result. Rushing to a solution – incomplete thinking. www.create-learning.com
  10. 10. Tools to Release Innovation www.create-learning.com
  11. 11. What are the success criteria, theWhat are the success criteria, the definition of “problem solved”?definition of “problem solved”? Define what “solved” means. It is important to communicate with all stakeholders the definition of success to avoid confusion. Clarify whether the goal is a quantifiable measure of improvement or complete elimination of the problem. All stakeholders should be clear on what the “problem solved” means. www.create-learning.com
  12. 12. www.create-learning.com http://create-learning.com/blog/team-building/quality-tools-to-discover-solutions-nine-windows
  13. 13. The DTC Operator Algorithm Define the problem: Name the system or the part of the system of interest. Consider ideas created by DTC extremes: www.create-learning.com
  14. 14. Dimensions: If dimensions were extremely large what would success look like, how would that happen, in what way could that system be developed? List ideas/solutions: If dimensions were extremely small (almost gone) what would success look like, how would that happen, in what ways could that system be developed? List ideas/solutions: www.create-learning.com
  15. 15. Time: If time were extremely long what would success look like, how would that happen, in what ways could that system be developed? (i.e. Days, Years, Decades instead of seconds or minutes) OR If speed were extremely slow what would success look like, how would that happen, in what ways could that system be developed? List ideas/solutions: If time were extremely small what would success look like, how would that happen, in what ways could that system be developed? (i.e. nanoseconds instead of seconds) OR If speed were extremely fast what would success look like, how would that happen, in what ways could that system be developed? List ideas/solutions: www.create-learning.com
  16. 16. Cost: (Not just in terms of dollars but costs in terms of downsides, harmful effects, etc…) If there was no limit on cost how could the problem be solved, in what ways could that system be developed? List ideas/solutions: If costs were extremely limited what would success look like, how would that happen, in what ways could that system be developed? List ideas/solutions: www.create-learning.com
  17. 17. The DTC Operator Algorithm Define the problem: Name the system or the part of the system of interest. Consider ideas created by DTC extremes: www.create-learning.com
  18. 18. Encourage discussions and ask more questions; For example… •What has happened for you to know that a solution is needed? •If I was to observe you working through your solution how would I know that you’re making progress? •On a scale of 0 – 10 with 0 being you have some idea what to do with this situation; and 10 being you know exactly what to do – where are you on this scale? •What have you already accomplished? •Is any of your solution already happening, even just a little bit? •What did you do to make that happen? Can you do more of that? •What is one thing you can do in the next 90 minutes that will increase your progress? www.create-learning.com
  19. 19. www.create-learning.com
  20. 20. Ask, What is your next step? When can we go-and-see? •What is your next step? •If you were one step closer to the goal, how would you know? •In the past with the success you have already had, what could you go-and-see that showed that you are progressing? •What is your next step? When can we go- and-see? www.create-learning.com
  21. 21. The team / I have a problem –> Who else has problems like ours?; When have we had problems like this in the past? –> How did others solve similar problems?; How did we solve the similar problems? –> The team / I have a solution! www.create-learning.com
  22. 22. Marshmallow Challenge ✦Build the Tallest Freestanding Structure: The winning team is the one that has the tallest structure measured from the table top surface to the top of the marshmallow. That means the structure cannot be suspended from a higher structure, like a chair, ceiling or chandelier. ✦The Entire Marshmallow Must be on Top: The entire marshmallow needs to be on the top of the structure. Cutting or eating part of the marshmallow disqualifies the team. ✦Use as Much or as Little of the Kit: The team can use as many or as few of the 20 spaghetti sticks, as much or as little of the string or tape. The team cannot use the paper bag as part of their structure. ✦Break up the Spaghetti, String or Tape: Teams are free to break the spaghetti, cut up the tape and string to create new structures. ✦The Challenge Lasts 18 minutes: Teams cannot hold on to the structure when the time runs out. Those touching or supporting the structure at the end of the exercise will be disqualified.www.create-learning.com
  23. 23. What? So What? Now What? www.create-learning.com
  24. 24. The team / I have a problem –> Who else has problems like ours?; When have we had problems like this in the past? –> How did others solve similar problems?; How did we solve the similar problems? –> The team / I have a solution www.create-learning.com
  25. 25. “…the ability of your company to be competitive & survive lies in the capability of the people in your organization to understand a situation and develop solutions.” www.create-learning.com
  26. 26. Create-Learning Innovation Programs About the Programs Organizations that wish to remain competitive in the business environment must develop their capacity to generate creative ideas and then use their talent well to transfer these ideas into innovative practices. This leads to new processes and improved methods for the best use of existing resources, and increases the ability to solve problems and implement solutions that enhance the organization. In addition to broadening their personal capacity for creativity and innovation, leaders are better able to implement innovative ideas into their existing business model. Using a mixture of creative problem solving and brain based leadership models the participants will find solutions to existing organizational situations and develop the steps to incorporate these innovations into their work. Program times, length, and focus are customized and developed to best serve your needs. Outcomes of Create-Learning Innovation Programs: •Develop a culture of innovation that engages team member creativity and energy •Challenge old ways of thinking and design new paradigms to drive greater success •Use existing resources to their greatest capacity •Share information amongst and between functions to reduce redundant work and speed productivity Contact: mike@create-learning.com +1.716.629.3678 www.create-learning.comwww.create-learning.com
  27. 27. Photo attribution http://www.flickr.com/photos/pasukaru76/4307189567/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/pasukaru76/3992935923/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/wingtorn/7225734766/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/33263856@N02/5157196328/in/photostream/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/aidanmorgan/4763085590/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/calliope/5902712709/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/pasukaru76/5018455914/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/kurtbudiarto/7150324143/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/derekgavey/5069358550/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/a_siegel/8133716733/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Necker_cube.svg http://www.flickr.com/photos/dhilung/3311130707/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/76657755@N04/7408506410/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/jdhancock/3948724485/ www.create-learning.com

×