VirologíA

9,577 views

Published on

3 Comments
18 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Porque el profesor o la ayudante no tienen autorizado descargarlo, o al menos eso dice cuando no me deja presionar save.
    Pregúntenle al profesor si quieren si les revoca la autorización.
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • :(
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • no se puede descargar :(
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
No Downloads
Views
Total views
9,577
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
795
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
26
Comments
3
Likes
18
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Figure: Figure 09-03 Caption: Comparison of naked and enveloped virus, two basic types of virus particles.
  • Figure: Figure 09-03 Caption: Comparison of naked and enveloped virus, two basic types of virus particles.
  • Figure: 07-02b Caption: Contrast of information transfer in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. (b) Eukaryote. Noncoding regions (introns) are removed from the primary RNA transcript before translation. The mRNAs of eukaryotes are almost always monocistronic. Please note the two types of cells are not drawn to scale. A typical prokaryotic cell would be 1 to 2 mm in diameter, and a typical eukaryotic (animal) cell about 25 mm in diameter.
  • Figure: Figure 09-12 Caption: Schematic representations of the main types of bacterial viruses. Those discussed in detail are M13,  X174, MS2, T4, lambda, T7, and Mu. Sizes are to approximate scale. The nucleocapsed of  6 is surrounded by a membrane.
  • Figure: Figure 09-08 Caption: The replication cycle of a bacterial virus. The general stages of virus replication are indicated.
  • Figure: Figure 09-16 Caption: The consequences of infection by a temperate bacteriophage. The alternatives on infection are replication and release of mature virus (lysis) or integration of the virus DNA into the host DNA (lysogenization). The lysogenic cell can also be induced to produce mature virus and lyse.
  • Figure: Figure 09-22a Caption: The shapes and relative sizes of vertebrate viruses of the major taxonomic groups. The hepadnavirus genome has one complete DNA strand and part of its complement.
  • Figure: Figure 09-22b Caption: The shapes and relative sizes of vertebrate viruses of the major taxonomic groups. The hepadnavirus genome has one complete DNA strand and part of its complement.
  • Figure: Figure 09-23 Caption: Possible effects that animal viruses may have on cells they infect. Note that unlike bacteriophages, with animal viruses the entire virion is taken up into the cell.
  • Figure: Figure 09-11 Caption: Formation of mRNA after infection of cells by viruses of different types. The chemical sense of the mRNA is considered as plus (+). The senses of the various virus nucleic acids are indicated as + if the same as mRNA, as - if opposite, or as ± if double-stranded. Almost all single-stranded DNA viruses are of the + sense, although in a few cases apparently either the + or - strand can be packaged. It is not completely clear if a virion with a - strand is infectious. The different classes of viruses in the Baltimore Classification are shown (see Table 9.2).
  • Figure: Figure 09-23 Caption: Possible effects that animal viruses may have on cells they infect. Note that unlike bacteriophages, with animal viruses the entire virion is taken up into the cell.
  • Figure: 07-02a Caption: Contrast of information transfer in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. (a) Prokaryote. A single mRNA often contains more than one coding region (such mRNAs are called polycistronic).
  • Figure: 07-02b Caption: Contrast of information transfer in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. (b) Eukaryote. Noncoding regions (introns) are removed from the primary RNA transcript before translation. The mRNAs of eukaryotes are almost always monocistronic. Please note the two types of cells are not drawn to scale. A typical prokaryotic cell would be 1 to 2 mm in diameter, and a typical eukaryotic (animal) cell about 25 mm in diameter.
  • Figure: Figure 09-01 Caption: Viral genomes. The genomes of viruses can be composed of either DNA or RNA, and some use both as their genomic material at different stages in their life cycle. However, only one type of nucleic acid is found in the virion of any particular type of virus. This can be single-stranded (ss), double-stranded (ds), or in the case of the hepadnaviruses, partially double-stranded.
  • Figure: Figure 09-02b Caption: An example of the arrangement of virus nucleic acid and protein coat in a tobacco mosaic virus. (b) Assembly of the tobacco mosaic virion. The RNA assumes a helical configuration surrounded by the protein capsid. The center of the particle is hollow.
  • Figure: Figure 09-10a-d Caption: Attachment of T4 bacteriophage virion to the cell wall of Escherichia coli and injection of DNA: (a) Unattached virion. (b) Attachment to the wall by the long tail fibers interacting with core polysaccharide. (c) Contact of cell wall by the tail pins. (d) Contraction of the tail sheath and injection of the DNA. For a detailed description of the gram-negative cell wall, see Section 4.9.
  • Figure: Figure 09-25a Caption: Replication process of a retrovirus. For more detail on conversion of RNA to DNA (step 3) refer to Figure 16.2.
  • Figure: Figure 09-08 Caption: The replication cycle of a bacterial virus. The general stages of virus replication are indicated.
  • Figure: Figure 09-16 Caption: The consequences of infection by a temperate bacteriophage. The alternatives on infection are replication and release of mature virus (lysis) or integration of the virus DNA into the host DNA (lysogenization). The lysogenic cell can also be induced to produce mature virus and lyse.
  • Figure: Figure 09-06b Caption: Quantification of bacterial virus by plaque assay using the agar overlay technique. (b) Photograph of a plate showing plaques formed by bacteriophage on a lawn of sensitive bacteria. The plaques shown are about 1–2 mm in diameter.
  • VirologíA

    1. 1. Virologia General
    2. 2. Definición y Características <ul><li>Elementos genéticos </li></ul><ul><li>Los virus, para poder multiplicarse deben obligadamente entrar en una célula. </li></ul><ul><li>Poseen una forma infecciosa madura extracelular. </li></ul><ul><li>Los virus, aprovechan la maquinaria metabólica de la célula huésped. </li></ul>
    3. 3. <ul><li>Los virus integran su material genético en el de la célula huésped, adquiriendo todas las características y propiedades, como por ejemplo el carácter de heredabilidad. </li></ul><ul><li>Los virus adquieren un carácter patógeno debido a que durante su replicación al interior de la célula huésped, se produce la destrucción de esta. </li></ul>Definición y Características
    4. 4. Definición y Características <ul><li>Elementos genéticos. </li></ul><ul><li>Los virus, para poder multiplicarse deben obligadamente entrar en una célula. </li></ul><ul><li>Poseen una forma infecciosa madura extracelular. </li></ul><ul><li>Los virus, aprovechan la maquinaria metabólica de la célula huésped. </li></ul>
    5. 5. Virión <ul><li>Partícula viral completa formada por una o más moléculas de ADN o ARN y rodeada por una cubierta de proteínas simple o compleja formada por carbohidratos, lípidos y proteínas. </li></ul>
    6. 7. VIRUS DESNUDOS VIRUS ENVUELTOS Envoltura Nucleo capside ADN/ ARN Capsomeros Capside Capside Compuesta de capsomeros
    7. 8. Definición y Características <ul><li>Elementos genéticos que pueden replicarse independientemente del DNA de una célula huésped, pero independiente de esta célula. </li></ul><ul><li>Los virus, para poder multiplicarse deben obligadamente entrar en una célula. </li></ul><ul><li>Poseen una forma infecciosa madura extracelular. </li></ul><ul><li>Los virus, aprovechan la maquinaria metabólica de la célula huésped. </li></ul>
    8. 10. Fase extracelular <ul><li>Los virus son incapaces de reproducirse y no realizan funciones enzimáticas. </li></ul>
    9. 11. Fase intracelular <ul><li>Son considerados como ácidos nucleicos que se replican e inducen el metabolismo de la célula huésped para sintetizar todos los componentes del virión. </li></ul>
    10. 13. Clasificación de los virus en función de sus genomas Clasificación de los virus en función de sus huéspedes Virus de Bacterias Virus de Plantas Virus de Animales
    11. 14. Virus Bacterianos, Bacteriófagos
    12. 17. Bacteriofagos Virulentos Temperados
    13. 18. Virus de animales
    14. 21. Clasificación de los virus en función de su replicación Los virus utilizan la maquinaria celular para la replicación y síntesis de sus ácidos nucleicos y para la transcripción de su información genética.
    15. 24. Clasificación de Baltimore Hepatitis B Retrovirus Gripe, Rabia Poliovirus Reovirus Anemia del Pollo Herpes RNA DNA RNAm RNAm RNAm RNAm RNAm Intermediario Replicativo DNAds Clase VII RNAss (+) Clase VI RNAss (-) Clase V RNAss (+) Clase IV RNAds Clase III DNAss Clase II DNAds Clase I Genoma Clase
    16. 26. CLASIFICACIÓN DE ACUERDO AL DAÑO PRODUCIDO MUERTE CELULAR: Efecto citopático observado en el tejido. Ej: Virus respiratorios y Virus de la Polio. EFECTO INDIRECTO: El daño se produce por la respuesta inmunitaria del huésped frente a la presencia del virus o componentes de su nucleocapside o envoltura, considerada antígeno. Hepatitis B. TRANSFORMACIÓN CELULAR: Desdiferenciación de células especializadas para generar tumores malignos. Ej: papiloma Humano, Hepatitis B, Leucemia de Células T.
    17. 28. Virus y Cáncer DNA Papiloma Cáncer cervical y de piel DNA Hepatitis B Carcinoma hepatocelular DNA Epstein-Barr Carcinoma Nasofaringeo DNA Epstein-Barr Linfoma de Burkitt RNA Leucemia Humana Leucemia de Células T Genoma Virus Cáncer
    18. 29. La hepatitis es una infección viral que produce la inflamación del hígado, como consecuencia de ésta se bloquea el paso de la bilis que produce el hígado al descomponer la grasa, y se altera la función del hígado de eliminar las toxinas de la sangre, de producir diversas sustancias importantes y de almacenar y distribuir la glucosa, vitaminas y minerales. CAUSAS La infección está producida por varios tipos de virus y por ello se caracterizan la hepatitis A, B, C,y D según el tipo de virus causante en cada caso. La complicación de la hepatitis puede llevar a una cirrosis de hígado y a un cáncer de hígado en algunos casos. Parte de los afectados (entre el 5 y 10%) se cronifican y son portadores del virus por lo que trasmiten la enfermedad. Para confirmar el diagnóstico se realizan análisis de la sangre que revela una elevación anormal de las enzimas del hígado. Luego se realizan diversos test para definir el virus causante de cada hepatitis. HEPATITIS
    19. 30. HEPATITIS A Oral Fecal a través de ciertos alimentos (crustáceos), agua o materiales contaminados 15 a 50 días VÍA DE CONTAGIO INCUBACIÓN Los síntomas mas frecuentes en la Hepatitis A son: fiebre pérdida del apetito malestar general con cansancio nauseas y molestias de estómago ictericia (color amarillo de la piel y del ojo) dolor en la parte alta del abdomen SÍNTOMAS
    20. 31. HEPATITIS B Sangre (sangre o agujas contaminadas) Sudor Semen Saliva o lágrimas Secreciones vaginales Heridas A través de la placenta al feto Contactos sexuales 15 a 50 días VÍA DE CONTAGIO INCUBACIÓN Similares a Hepatitis A aunque más lentos y además aparece un cuadro como de gripe, con dolores musculares y de cabeza, o incluso picores en la piel y artritis. Todos estos síntomas duran de 1 a 6 semanas y la ictericia unas tres semanas SÍNTOMAS
    21. 32. HEPATITIS C VÍA DE CONTAGIO Transfusiones sanguíneas: en la actualidad es una vía de contagio poco frecuente por los controles a los que se somete a la sangre utilizada para dichas transfusiones. Sin embargo, existen muchos pacientes que contrajeron la enfermedad mediante esta vía cuando no se había descubierto el virus ni había forma de detectarlo (antes de 1990). En la actualidad existe un periodo denominado 'ventana', desde que te contagias hasta que desarrollas anticuerpos (que es lo que detectan los análisis), en el que se pasaría por alto el diagnóstico de una hepatitis. Para reducir el riesgo, se hace a los pacientes una encuesta sobre factores de riesgo de modo que si existe duda de que haya podido contagiarse, su sangre no se acepta.
    22. 33. HEPATITIS C VÍA DE CONTAGIO Compartir jeringuillas: los pacientes adictos a drogas por vía parenteral y las personas que fueron tratadas con inyecciones en la época en la que se usaban jeringuillas no desechables pueden contagiarse de la hepatitis C. En la actualidad, en nuestro país el colectivo de los usuarios de drogas es uno de los más afectados por la enfermedad . El personal sanitario puede contagiarse con un pinchazo accidental. Los tatuajes y ‘piercing’ pueden ser causa de infección si no se usan materiales desechables o no se tienen las medidas higiénicas adecuadas. La persona que hace el ‘piercing’ debe utilizar guantes y lavarse las manos después de cada trabajo.
    23. 34. HEPATITIS C VÍA DE CONTAGIO Vía sexual: mantener relaciones sexuales no suele ser una causa frecuente de contagio. Existen algunas relaciones de más riesgo, como son las de carácter homosexual (si existen erosiones anales). También aumenta el riesgo de contagio si la persona afectada o su pareja tienen una enfermedad de transmisión sexual concomitante: la infección por VIH aumenta el riesgo de contagio , así como la gonorrea o la infección por clamidia. Vía materno-fetal: los hijos de las madres afectadas pueden contagiarse. Este riesgo es aproximadamente de un 25% si no están en tratamiento y de menos del 2% en el caso de que se traten y, también depende, en parte, de que existan otras infecciones asociadas o de lo traumático del parto. Se puede contagiar en cualquier momento del embarazo pero parece más frecuente en el momento del parto .
    24. 35. Virus H51 El virus que produce la gripe aviar es el H51 y es similar al virus de la gripe tipo A y es capaz de mutar muy rápidamente. De hecho, hasta el momento se han producido 16 mutaciones de este virus lo que, por ahora, hace imposible comenzar a fabricar las vacunas. Cuando se produzca el primer contagio del virus de persona a persona se podrá detectar cuál es el virus exacto que produce la enfermedad y se comenzarán a fabricar las vacunas. GRIPE AVIAR
    25. 42. Definición y Características <ul><li>Elementos genéticos que pueden replicarse independientemente del DNA de una célula huésped, pero independiente de esta célula. </li></ul><ul><li>Los virus, para poder multiplicarse deben obligadamente entrar en una célula. </li></ul><ul><li>Poseen una forma infecciosa madura extracelular. </li></ul><ul><li>Los virus, aprovechan la maquinaria metabólica de la célula huésped. </li></ul>
    26. 44. <ul><li>Los virus integran su material genético en el de la célula huésped, adquiriendo todas las características y propiedades, como por ejemplo el carácter de heredabilidad. </li></ul><ul><li>Los virus adquieren un carácter patógeno debido a que durante su replicación al interior de la célula huésped, se produce la destrucción de esta. </li></ul>Definición y Características
    27. 47. Virología General
    28. 48. VIROIDES y PRIONES Diapositiva 27 Diapositiva 27
    29. 49. NEXT VIROIDES y PRIONES

    ×