Organizational Change

3,274 views

Published on

A presentation on culture, leadership and organizational change for the MBA program at Leeds University

Published in: Business
0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
3,274
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1,589
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Organizational Change

  1. 1. leading<br />organizational<br />change<br />mickyates<br />www.leader-values.com<br />Nov 2009<br />
  2. 2. page 2<br />leadership …<br />
  3. 3. page 3<br />page 3<br />leadership is more than management<br />leaders have a rock-solid value system which is congruent with their followers<br />leaders are interdependent with followers<br />leaders make the complicated simple<br />leaders are story tellers<br />leaders always accelerate change<br />leadership is a process – not an event<br />
  4. 4. page 4<br />
  5. 5. page 5<br />
  6. 6. page 6<br />team<br />trust<br />personal<br />courage<br />
  7. 7. page 7<br />culture<br />
  8. 8. 1. POWER DISTANCE<br />The extent to which power is distributed equally within a society and the degree that society accepts this distribution.<br />A high power distance culture prefers hierarchical bureaucracies, strong leaders and a high regard for authority.<br />A low power distance culture tends to favour personal responsibility and autonomy.<br /> <br />page 8<br />GeertHofstede – cultural dimensions<br />
  9. 9. 2. UNCERTAINTY AVOIDANCE<br />The degree to which individuals require set boundaries and clear structures, <br />Ahigh uncertainty culture allows individuals to cope better with risk and innovation; a low uncertainty culture emphasises a higher level of standardisation and greater job security.<br /> <br />3. INDIVIDUALISM versus COLLECTIVISM<br />The degree to which individuals base their actions on self-interest versus the interests of the group.<br />In an individual culture, free will is highly valued. In a collective culture, personal needs are less important than the group&apos;s needs. This dimension influences the role government is expected to play in markets.<br />page 9<br />GeertHofstede – cultural dimensions<br />
  10. 10. 4. MASCULINITY versus FEMININITY<br />A measure of a society&apos;s goal orientation. <br />Amasculine culture emphasises status derived from wages and position; a feminine culture emphasises human relations and quality of life.<br /> <br />5. TIME ORIENTATION<br />The degree to which a society does or does not value long-term commitments and respect for tradition.<br />Long-term traditions and commitments hamper institutional change.<br />page 10<br />GeertHofstede – cultural dimensions<br />
  11. 11. page 11<br />Gerry Johnson – the cultural web<br />stories<br />rituals &<br /> routines<br />symbols<br />paradigm<br />control<br />systems<br />power<br />structure<br />organization<br />structures<br />
  12. 12. page 12<br />leading<br />organizational <br />change<br />
  13. 13. establish a sense of urgency<br />create a guiding coalition<br />develop a clear vision<br />share the vision<br />empower people to overcome obstacles<br />secure short term wins<br />consolidate and keep moving<br />anchor the change<br />page 13<br />John Kotter<br />
  14. 14. page 14<br />leading organizational change<br />Envision<br />an accepted need for change<br />a viable vision of an alternative state<br />Enable<br />3. change agents in place – with a guiding coalition<br />4. sponsorship from above<br />5. realistic scale & pace of change – with sense of urgency<br />6. an integrated transition program<br />Empower<br />7. organization shape to show how tasks and people fit<br />8. a symbolic end to the status quo<br />9. a plan for likely resistance<br />Energize<br />10. constant advocacy – maintain momentum of change<br />11. a locally owned benefits plan<br />
  15. 15. page 15<br />Envision<br />1. an accepted need for change<br /><ul><li>there is a “need” creation process – the leader usually gets it first
  16. 16. leader creates the acceptance environment through a trust building process</li></ul>show “proofs” that appeal to emotions / feelings as well as rational argument through dialog<br />either build trust before the change (often don’t have time) or co-evolve trust with the change by co-design<br />leaders embody the values of the enterprise<br />© mick yates 11/21/09<br />
  17. 17. page 16<br />Envision<br />2. a viable vision of an alternative state<br /><ul><li>vision and action aligned with enterprise values
  18. 18. leader convinces the key actors of the viability of the vision – starting with a clear “end state” picture</li></ul>practical – consider technology, organization, finance etc.<br />worth doing – for the enterprise and for the key actors <br />balance what is “set in stone” with what can be evolved by others<br />the vision must be able to survive the environmental context outside of the creator’s mind<br /><ul><li>others can then help adapt and evolve this
  19. 19. OGSTM - objectives, goals, strategies, tactics, measures</li></ul>© mick yates 11/21/09<br />
  20. 20. page 17<br />Enable<br />3. change agents in place – with a guiding coalition<br /><ul><li>simultaneously build a coalition of willing stakeholders and a net of trusted sponsors</li></ul>an emergent coalition or deliberately build a coalition<br /><ul><li>sponsors must have a good knowledge of their people and their non-hierarchical roles</li></ul>e.g. hubs, authorities, bridges, gatekeepers<br /><ul><li>sponsors own the change, not just the initiator </li></ul>© mick yates 11/21/09<br />
  21. 21. page 18<br />Empower<br />4. sponsorship from above …<br /><ul><li>of course ….</li></ul>© mick yates 11/21/09<br />
  22. 22. page 19<br />Enable<br />5. realistic scale and pace of change – but with a clear sense of urgency <br /><ul><li>analyzing the environmental context will help separate realistic and unrealistic goals
  23. 23. gauging realism is the “artistic” part of this</li></ul>involve the guiding coalition to help define<br /><ul><li>get some wins on the way to the big goal
  24. 24. maintain tempo, and work with rolling forecasts</li></ul>keep people on board<br /><ul><li>use time sequencing and prioritizing of activities</li></ul>© mick yates 11/21/09<br />
  25. 25. page 20<br />Enable<br />6. an integrated transition program<br /><ul><li>nurture the existing “revenue streams” whilst also building capacity for the end state</li></ul>create interdependence between both<br />balance need for forecastable / predictable profit with “sexy” growth<br />pace the transition from one to the other<br /><ul><li>include all parts of the organization in building capacity
  26. 26. executional feedback loop to course correct and adapt
  27. 27. continual assessment of the psychological transition for people in the organization</li></ul>© mick yates 11/21/09<br />
  28. 28. page 21<br />Empower<br />7. organization shape to show how tasks and people fit<br /><ul><li>focus on the work needed to deliver the vision
  29. 29. define the skills needed – and the gaps in capability</li></ul>don’t start planning with the names in the boxes<br /><ul><li>enrol the guiding coalition in the organization design
  30. 30. if you can’t make all the roles and reporting lines clear, say so</li></ul>provide clarity even if you can’t provide certainty<br />© mick yates 11/21/09<br />
  31. 31. page 22<br />Empower<br />8. a symbolic end to the status quo<br /><ul><li>have a clear end to the old whilst also dealing with the mourning for the old</li></ul>be creative about symbols and rituals<br /><ul><li>have a symbolic start to the new state</li></ul>© mick yates 11/21/09<br />
  32. 32. page 23<br />Empower<br />9. a plan for likely resistance<br /><ul><li>anticipate “pockets of resistance” and develop a specific plan for overcoming objectives</li></ul>assess and deal with organizational and technological aspects<br />assess and deal with the human issues<br /><ul><li>surgical removal of obstacles if necessary</li></ul>© mick yates 11/21/09<br />
  33. 33. page 24<br />Energize<br />10. constant advocacy – maintain momentum of the change<br /><ul><li>build a coherent and thorough communication plan</li></ul>do things quickly<br />do things simultaneously<br /><ul><li>create meaning – top down and bottom up flow of communication</li></ul>bring it alive at the individual level<br /><ul><li>tell them, tell them, and tell them again</li></ul>© mick yates 11/21/09<br />
  34. 34. page 25<br />Energize<br />11. a locally owned benefits plan<br /><ul><li>benefits are expressed and measured in a concrete way for both employees and the business</li></ul>with accountability<br /><ul><li>link to on-going performance management system</li></ul>© mick yates 11/21/09<br />
  35. 35. page 26<br />leading organizational change<br />Envision<br />an accepted need for change<br />a viable vision of an alternative state<br />Enable<br />3. change agents in place – with a guiding coalition<br />4. sponsorship from above<br />5. realistic scale & pace of change – with sense of urgency<br />6. an integrated transition program<br />Empower<br />7. organization shape to show how tasks and people fit<br />8. a symbolic end to the status quo<br />9. a plan for likely resistance<br />Energize<br />10. constant advocacy – maintain momentum of change<br />11. a locally owned benefits plan<br />
  36. 36. page 27<br />never underestimate the enemy<br />respect him, but equally always remember, regardless of the odds, team to team, yours is better<br />if there is any doubt in your mind in regard to this previous sentence you had better start training harder, or hand over your command<br />australian army junior leadership manual<br />© mick yates 11/21/09<br />
  37. 37. Leadership is the energetic process of getting people fully and willingly committed to a new and sustainable course of action, to meet commonly agreed objectives whilst having commonly held values<br />page 28<br />

×