Mg.ff.rttc.2010

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RTTC EcoSchool Powerpoint

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  • Goals of the power point: Define the ecological dilemmas facing the earth. ID the implications for our communities ID strategies & solutions to resolve these dilemmas
  • Healthy Communities are those that are able to maintain and revive cultural and ancestral knowledge and integrity
  • Slides 3 through 19 provide a visual illustration of resource intensive industrial production and the severe ecological degradation that results from it.
  • Industrial coal bed mining site, probably in Arizona
  • Nuclear power plant in Great Britain
  • This is the face of resource intensive industrial production & consumption: We are treating finite resources as if they were infinite. The earth simply doesn’t have the capacity to sustain this model of growth. The consumption based mentality and ‘throw-away’ culture attached to it is completely unsustainable… (Image: Chris Jordan) A big thank you to Chris Jordan, who conceptualized and created Slides 6-18. More info at: www.chrisjordan.org
  • 2.5 million bottles are used in the U.S. every hour… (Image: Chris Jordan)
  • 2.5 million bottles are used in the U.S. every hour… (Image: Chris Jordan)
  • This is the face of resource intensive industrial production & consumption: We are treating finite resources as if they were infinite. The earth simply doesn’t have the capacity to sustain this model of growth. The consumption based mentality and ‘throw-away’ culture attached to it is completely unsustainable… (Image: Chris Jordan)
  • 11,000 jet trails - equivalent to the number of commercial flights in the U.S. every eight hours. (Image: Chris Jordan)
  • 11,000 jet trails - equivalent to the number of commercial flights in the U.S. every eight hours. (Image: Chris Jordan)
  • This is the face of resource intensive industrial production & consumption: We are treating finite resources as if they were infinite. The earth simply doesn’t have the capacity to sustain this model of growth. The consumption based mentality and ‘throw-away’ culture attached to it is completely unsustainable… (Image: Chris Jordan)
  • 1.14 million brown paper bags supermarket bags are used in the U.S. every hour. (Image: Chris Jordan)
  • 1.14 million brown paper bags supermarket bags are used in the U.S. every hour. (Image: Chris Jordan)
  • This is the face of resource intensive industrial production & consumption: We are treating finite resources as if they were infinite. The earth simply doesn’t have the capacity to sustain this model of growth. The consumption based mentality and ‘throw-away’ culture attached to it is completely unsustainable… (Image: Chris Jordan)
  • 60,000 plastic bags are used in the U.S. every five seconds. (Image: Chris Jordan)
  • 60,000 plastic bags are used in the U.S. every five seconds. (Image: Chris Jordan)
  • This is the face of resource intensive industrial production & consumption: We are treating finite resources as if they were infinite. The earth simply doesn’t have the capacity to sustain this model of growth. The consumption based mentality and ‘throw-away’ culture attached to it is completely unsustainable… (Image: Chris Jordan)
  • 75,000 shipping containers are processed through U.S. ports every day. (Image: Chris Jordan)
  • Let’s know look at the Root Causes of this unsustainable reality. Next 3 slides give an overview of the Root Causes… Turn this all into resource intensive industrial production - globalized at scale. “A community can “slash and burn” agriculture - common among many traditional communities, and, actually, one of the reasons why the soil in the the amazon is so incredible. - Mother Earth’s systems can manage that- what they can’t manage is the excizing of antire lung of the planet - whether that is the Amazon Rainforests or the Athabascan Forests in Alberta. The place of greatest concentration of fossil fuels, is the place of the greatest amount of sun’s energy, is the place of greatest biological and cultural diversity. No accident.
  • Multinational Corporations now have the capacity to literally pick-up a factory and move it from one country to another in the search for cheaper labor. They do this to maximize profit by minimizing costs (paying workers less whenever possible).
  • Multinational Corporations now have the capacity to literally pick-up a factory and move it from one country to another in the search for cheaper labor. They do this to maximize profit by minimizing costs (paying workers less whenever possible).
  • In the past 30 years, 1/3 of the Earth’s natural resources have been consumed. The US has 5% of the world’s population but uses 30% of it’s resources and produces 30% of it’s waste. If everyone consumed at US levels, we would need 3-5 planets. 80% of global forests have been cut down. 75% of global fisheries are fished at or beyond capacity
  • 80% of Forests have been cut down
  • The slide is a summary of the 5 areas of ecological crises laid out in Slides 25 thru 45.
  • 1% of Earth’s water available Every drop of water is every drop of water that has ever been and will ever be. It’s just shifting states. What we’re doing is disrupting that cycle. By paving, piping, peeing, pooping, and otherwise polluting, we’ve cut what’s available to us. We have been working directly counter to nature’s bid to slow, spread, sink it. A fisherman in Guanqiao Lake, China expressing shock at the massive death of fish from industrial pollutants
  • 100,000 synthetic chemicals developed & deployed into our bodies & environment since WWII with little testing for impacts on health & ecosystems and virtually no synergistic testing (cummulative impacts). Raise your hand if you know someone with cancer or asthma. Air pollution in Tiananmen Square, China. This kind of smog is now commonplace in many of China’s cities, due to the rapid pace industrialization over the last 25 years. These skies were clear for 2 weeks during the Beijing Olympics, as the Chinese government forced industry to shut down a week prior to present ‘blue skies’ and a ‘green image’ of China for the international community. (This demonstrates that the government can force industry to seize harmful operations…) Garbage Patches in the Ocean. The Oceans are the largest dumping ground of plastics, swirling in great gyres in the pacific, atlantic and presumed in all oceans. Massive floating accumulation masses (size of texas and beyond in the pacific)
  • Butcher– describing greenhouse effect We are creating a different planet Earth. We are far into the problem (CO 2 at the highest level ever, 70 year lag, committed to positive feedback and tipping points). We need to drastically cut GHG emissions, peaking in 10-15 years and progressing to near zero in this century. The impacts are already devastating. We are not all in the same boat. It’s looters vs suvivors. Who gets displaced. It’s the millions of gallons of oil spilled in the gulf. Who is cleaning it up. Who will suffer the prolonged consequences. The implications for poor people around the world are very serious. Marginalized communities will be disproportionately impacted by global warming (1st to suffer + last to receive support) unless we demand otherwise.
  • Today, in the u.s., less than 1% of people are farmers. A century ago, 1/3 of the U.S. population, some 32 million people, lived on farms. 6 There are more prisoners (2.3 million) than farmers in the United States today. A few global corporations have seized ownership of all aspects of the food system – from land ownership, to seed and farm inputs, to distribution, processing and retail sale. This has driven traditional farming cultures all over the world to collapse. Haiti Mudcakes– people are unable to feed themselves because of the destruction of their forests, ecosystems, and taking their land into the market. Bill Clinton in the mid-1990s encouraged Aristide to dramatically cut tariffs on imported U.S. rice. "It may have been good for some of my farmers in Arkansas, but it has not worked. It was a mistake," Clinton told the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on March 10, 2010. "I had to live everyday with the consequences of the loss of capacity to produce a rice crop in Haiti to feed those people because of what I did; nobody else.”
  • Our peoples have been pushed off the land that our ancestors tended for generations because of slavery and colonialism, “free trade agreements” or other forms of trans-national corporate control. We are all peoples rooted in tradition linked to what we grew, what we ate, what we believed about the world, how we spoke. In displacing us from these roots, this system has cut one of the keys to our survival. It has forced us to migrate for economic reasons and now the same forces pushing us out of where we came from are denying our right to be here.
  • We are in the 6th great extinction in history of life on this planet. Only one ever caused by a single species Most rapid in pace (thousands of years rather than millions) Most potential to be most complete (started 12,000 years ago) event of the planet, known as the Holocene Epoch. What defines it- human caused, potentially the most complete, rapid times-scale (thousands of years rather than hundreds of thousands, or millions). That is to day, it is defined by the presence of humans. At current rates of extinction, the planet stands to lose 90% of living languages within a generation – from 6,000 to 600. Indigenous peoples account for 80-90% of the world’s cultural diversity. Simultaneously, species are becoming extinct at 1,000 times the natural rate. Harvard biologist Edward Wilson predicts that our present course will lead to the extinction of half of all plant and animal species by 2100. “ The loss of cultural diversity and traditional knowledge – of farm communities, languages, and indigenous cultures – is intricately linked to the loss of biological diversity. Indigenous peoples and farming communities are the creators, custodians and continuing innovators of biological knowledge and resources.” – ETC Group
  • Intrinsic value - sacred gift of life Practical value - provides ecosystem services and cultural solutions to local and global problems Fosters adaptability & resilience to social and environmental change Assists in the survival and evolution of humans and often other species
  • Word for Crisis in Chinese has 2 meanings– danger and opportunity. As these slides show, we are in real danger. A transition is happening with or without our communities. Food prices are already going up and scarcity is a real threat. If the US and other countries keep polluting the planet at the rate it is projected, sea levels will rise by 4-6 feet by the end of the century. But it is also an opportunity. This system which has been set up to force us al to “get mine”, often at the expense of someone else, is bankrupt. We need to shift the drivers from get mine to share ours if we are going to survive. But not just to survive but to thrive as the full human beings we are meant to be. Doing meaningful work that we can see the value of directly in our communities, spending time with our kids and our families, participating in the decisions that affect us. This is the world we need to win in order to stave off the danger. And this is the world we must imagine and win.
  • First, we need movements that can resist the destruction of our peoples and Mother Earth. There are forces on the move. Land Reform– Small farmers cool the planet – La Via Campesina Stopping corporate control of seeds Winning a Just Transition (Oakland Climate Action Coalition)
  • We must foster resilience, often as resistance. As the land trust will do. Permiculture for the People 2010 South Central Farm, LA Participatory Budgeting Implementation in Porto Alegre, Brazil The first full participatory budgeting process was developed in the city of Porto Alegre, Brazil, starting in 1989. Participatory budgeting was part of a number of innovative reform programs started in 1989 to overcome severe inequality in living standards amongst city residents. One third of the city’s residents lived in isolated slums at the city outskirts, lacking access to public amenities (water, sanitation, health care facilities, and schools).[1] Participatory budgeting in Porto Alegre occurs annually, starting with a series of neighborhood, regional, and citywide assemblies, where residents and elected budget delegates identify spending priorities and vote on which priorities to implement.[2] Porto Alegre spends about 200 million dollars per year on construction and services, this money is subject to participatory budgeting. Annual spend on fixed expenses such as debt service and pensions, are not subject to public participation. Around fifty thousand residents of Porto Alegre now take part in the participatory budgeting process (compared to 1.5 million city inhabitants), with the number of participants growing year on year since 1989. Participants are from diverse economic and political backgrounds.[2] The participatory budgeting cycle starts in January and assemblies across the city facilitate maximum participation and interaction. Each February there is instruction from city specialists in technical and system aspects of city budgeting. In March there are plenary assemblies in each of the city's 16 districts as well as assemblies dealing with such areas as transportation, health, education, sports, and economic development. These large meetings—with participation that can reach over 1,000—elect delegates to represent specific neighborhoods. The mayor and staff attend to respond to citizen concerns. In the following month's delegates meet weekly or biweekly in each district to review technical project criteria and district needs. City department staff may participate according to their area of expertise. At a second regional plenary, regional delegates prioritize the district's demands and elect 42 councillors representing all districts and thematic areas to serve on the Municipal Council of the Budget. The main function of the Municipal Council of the Budget is to reconcile the demands of each district with available resources, and to propose and approve an overall municipal budget. The resulting budget is binding, though the city council can suggest, but not require changes. Only the Mayor may veto the budget, or remand it back to the Municipal Council of the Budget (this has never happened).[2] 1 http://siteresources.worldbank.org/INTEMPOWERMENT/Resources/14657_Partic-Budg-Brazil-web.pdf 2 Porto Alegre's Budget Of, By, and For the People by David Lewit
  • Restoration: Return to the web of life what has been forced into the chain of the market; and allow for planetary systems to heal A river will find its course, if it is liberated. We must liberate it- we must restore to the web of life that which has been subordinated to the chain of the market- recognizing the industrial scale of things as a problem (water management at the mega dam scale). Winnemem Wintu Tribe’s fight against expansion of the Shasta Dam. McCloud River La Colectiva Domestic Worker Cooperative in San Francisco. Worker owned living wage house cleaning business-- tag line Organized Labor for an Organized Home. One of the steps in the transition is to restore human labor back to the web of life, and out of the chain of the market. Worker ownership, worker organizing, and making invisible work visible. (Taxi Driver Coop at TWU) In the natural web of life - nothing is garbage; nothing goes to waste. There is Zero Waste . One creature’s/plant’s waste is another’s creature’s/plant’s food source. By adapting human settlements back towards this ‘closed loop’ system, we can reestablish a sustainable way of life for all, humans included. Diversity is our best defense.
  • We have to dream up a world where many worlds fit. Where social and ecological relationships are transparent, democratic, and just rather than invisible and exploitative. Where the work necessary for taking care of one another and the places we live is highly valued as THE critical work. To move from a “get mine” to a “share ours” society will require the critical roles of healers, counselors, spiritual guides. Mediators, facilitators, organizers. As well as bus drivers, bike mechanics, fix-it folks, and urban recyclers/reclaimers. It means shifting the driver of the economy from growth to well-being “vivir bien”.
  • To achieve self-determination and self-sufficiency we must 1st build community-based and community-managed organizations & institutions. By building democracy from the bottom-up, we can then implement solutions to the ecological crisis that are rooted in a community perspective (vs. Corporate led ‘solutions’ that will inevitably prioritize profit over the planet’s needs & people’s needs.) People take care of the place they live in.
  • and other forms of closed-loop, clean energy systems that are localized. energy infrastructure, all energy comes from the sun, but the longer it waits solar in the city: a top public building, urban housing, etc. Produced at home, public power - we can not solar panel our way out of the problem, but it does provide a piece of the transition. Traditional water wheel. This is in slovakia. a minor diversion stream from a river drives this wheel which provides public power for streetlights, buildings, and many homes. Passive Solar (solar tubes, passive solar design image) provide smart ways to orient with the environment, not despite it. While most design is currently focused on “single family homes” - the design principles can be used for any structures. Pedal power in Kerala. Here we see the importance of decentralization. The scale of the problem does not dictate the scale of the solutions. Biogas to energy- - methane gas trapping from dung, or animals, or composting toilets, etc.
  • As shown here, the SEA Streets Project focused on Broadview, a residential section of northwest Seattle located in the Pipers Creek Watershed. (top right) Tree people in LA connecting with community to engage in watershed restoration, and flood remediation.(top left) Living kidney for a parking lot- that remediates water run-off from a parking lot that is oil soaked.(top center, Portland) Redesigning streets to slow water, slow traffic, improve livability, and run water into soil. A Play-Powered water pump in South Africa. While the primary implementation of such small scale systems are currently not Community Controlled, there is no reason that they can’t be the Acequia water management system in New Mexico - traditionally commons based. This concept of Slow, Spread, Sink, vs. Pave, Pipe Pump and Pollute comes from Brock Dollman of Occidental Arts and Ecology Center.
  • grow vegetables in cities through urgan gardens, community gardens, kitchen gardens, rooftop gardents, forrage gardens, farm protien (avoid the row crops) in the outlying rural basin.  Cities that produce their own food (up until the 1940's 70% of NY city's food came from the surrounding states.  In Paris up until 1970.   Think about the health and jobs that creates). But it is more than growing food- it is also about urban design, soil care and living in relation to place. Most of us living in cities have little understanding of seasons, rains, rain-fall, soil health, etc. Food sovereignty is the right of peoples to: define their own food and agriculture; to protect and regulate domestic agricultural production and trade in order to achieve sustainable development objectives; to determine the extent to which they want to be self reliant; to restrict the dumping of products in their markets; and to provide local fisheries-based communities the priority in managing the use of and the rights to aquatic resources. Statement on Peoples’ Food Sovereignty” by La Via Campesina, et al., 1996
  • Transit Justice is not simply about transit options and ways for folks to move around, but about integrating communities and places within a city or region. Mass transit allows for less road and asphault.
  • cities require a rural basin - basin of relations water sheds, food sheds, trade sheds, energy sheds. We have to reject borders and embrace boundaries. meaningful ecological boundaries, social boundaries, community boundaries, etc.
  • buen vivir photo credit: Innosanto Nagara, in Havana Cuba
  • The Earth and her natural systems have the power to regenerate. She’s been doing it quite nicely for millions of years… What’s thrown things out of order in the last 200 years is the fact that humans are extracting and consuming resources at the intense scale born out of the Industrial Revolution. Zero waste is an idea to extend the current ideas of recycling to form a circular system where as much waste as possible is reused, similar to the way it is in nature. The best example of zero waste practiced by mankind is found in zero waste agriculture where the waste of each process becomes the feedstock for another process.
  • Healthy Communities are those that are able to maintain and revive cultural and ancestral knowledge and integrity
  • Healthy Communities are those that are able to maintain and revive cultural and ancestral knowledge and integrity
  • Healthy Communities are those that are able to maintain and revive cultural and ancestral knowledge and integrity
  • The issues that seem so important today– the fight for day-to-day livelihood and dignity– in 50 years will be magnified 10 times if we don’t win back our right to foster healthy human settlements. It will mean severe impacts in terms of rising sea levels, shifting weather patterns, drought, scarcity of food, water, energy resources, and more. The transition is happening with or without our communities. You hear about it in terms of climate policy– cap and trade– high density development, etc. Who drives that transition is critical.
  • So how can working-class communities of color lead this transition in the right direction? Foster communities of resistance and resilience that can rewrite the rules of the game with values that will enable humans to live in harmony with the earth and each other. Our ultimate task is to organize communities of resistance & resilience that can reimagine society based on values of sharing and caring. RESILIENCE is a form of RESISTANCE (when done well); RESILIENCE leads to RESTORATION (when done well) RESILIENCE manifests or VISIONS (Re-IMAGINING) of how we could live well.
  • Mg.ff.rttc.2010

    1. 1. FREEDOM FIGHTING WHILE DEFENDING THE EARTH: How Community Solutions will heal the planet, meet our needs and transform our cities. ©2009, Movement Generation Justice & Ecology Project
    2. 2. Definition: Frontline Community Community who sees how they are directly impacted by the root causes of, impacts from and false solutions to the ecological crisis.
    3. 3. Humans have always modified and impacted their environment in different ways… PUERTO RICO NEPAL
    4. 4. What has changed is the scale…
    5. 5. and intensity…
    6. 7. This image depicts 2.5 million plastic bottles – the number used in the US every hour. Image by Chris Jordan
    7. 8. Image by Chris Jordan
    8. 9. Image by Chris Jordan
    9. 10. Depicts 11,000 jet trails, equal to the number of commercial flights in the US every eight hours. Image by Chris Jordan
    10. 11. Image by Chris Jordan
    11. 12. Image by Chris Jordan
    12. 13. This image depicts 1.14 million brown paper supermarket bags, the number used in the US every hour. Image by Chris Jordan
    13. 14. Image by Chris Jordan
    14. 15. Image by Chris Jordan
    15. 16. This image depicts 60,000 plastic bags, the number used in the US every five seconds. Image by Chris Jordan
    16. 17. Image by Chris Jordan
    17. 18. Image by Chris Jordan
    18. 19. This image depicts 75,000 shipping containers, the number of containers processed through American ports every day. Image by Chris Jordan
    19. 20. Image by Chris Jordan
    20. 21. <ul><li>What is causing this? </li></ul>
    21. 22. Globalized, Industrial , Capitalist Production Industrial – meaning most commodities are made in large-scale industrial processes by mega-corporations that make 50 million shoes instead of 100.
    22. 23. Globalized , Industrial, Capitalist Production Globalized – meaning the components of each product are made in multiple countries, wherever the most profit can be made.
    23. 24. Globalized, Industrial, Capitalist Production Capitalist – meaning the sole goal of the system is making profit.
    24. 25. Resource-Intensive Industrial Production Who Benefits? Who Pays?
    25. 27. 80% of Forests Destroyed
    26. 28. 75% of Fisheries Fished at or Beyond Capacity
    27. 29. Our ecological crisis can be broken into parts: A clean water crisis A waste & toxics crisis A climate & energy crisis A food and agriculture crisis A biological & cultural diversity crisis
    28. 30. This creates problems for people: WATER
    29. 31. This creates problems for people: WASTE & TOXICS TIANANMEN SQUARE, CHINA
    30. 32. This creates problems for people: Climate disruption discriminates against the poor ENERGY & CLIMATE CHANGE Pakistan New Orleans
    31. 33. This creates problems for people: FOOD & AGRICULTURE A few global corporations have seized ownership of all aspects of the food system – from land ownership, to seed and farm inputs, to distribution, processing and retail sale. This has driven traditional farming cultures all over the world to collapse.
    32. 34. Crisis of space and place: Displacement
    33. 35. 6 th Mass Extinction of Life on Planet Earth CULTURAL & BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY
    34. 36. Diversity is truly our best defense CULTURAL & BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY Photo Credits: Amazon Watch; Women of Color Resource Center; Via Campesina; Nigeria Solidarity; Chinese Progressive Association; Gopal Dayaneni
    35. 38. Our People Must Lead the Way: RESISTANCE
    36. 39. We Must Foster Our RESILIENCE
    37. 40. We Must RESTORE and HEAL Restore the web of life
    38. 41. We must REIMAGINE a World of Many Worlds Creating the transformative narrative for our collective liberation and ecological restoration
    39. 42. So what will it take? IMAGE: HESPERIAN FOUNDATION People take care of the place they live in. ...and what does that look like in the urban context? We must build community institutions. Rebuild community control.
    40. 43. COMMUNITY SOLUTIONS HEAL THE PLANET & MEET OUR NEEDS RESISTS systemic ecocide RESTORES the web of life REIMAGINES by revealing a better way RESILIENCE at its BEST
    41. 44. cities that run on the sun small scale, closed-loop, locally produced, community controlled, renewable
    42. 45. cities that go with the flow de-industrialize our water supply: slow it, spread it, sink it, store it, share it and circulate it vs. pave it, pipe it, pump it, pollute it and profit off it
    43. 46. cities that know how to grow short-chain and known-chain exchange, culturally appropriate, seasonal, healthy, organic, diverse, participatory, and hella yummy
    44. 47. cities that move in mass accessible, public, free, frequent, appropriate to place, integrative
    45. 48. cities that know where they are from borders to boundaries: food sheds, water sheds, energy sheds, trade sheds...
    46. 49. cities that we all call home where everyone lives well and nobody lives better
    47. 50. The Earth: <ul><li>Operates based on mutually beneficial relationships </li></ul><ul><li>Seeks balance </li></ul><ul><li>Has limits </li></ul><ul><li>Operates on zero waste </li></ul>
    48. 51. www.movementgeneration.org Design: [email_address] Poster: Jesus Baraza & Melanie Cervantes
    49. 52. Definition: Frontline Community Community who sees how they are directly impacted by the root causes of, impacts from and false solutions to the ecological crisis.
    50. 55. THREE STEPS TO GET US WHAT WE REALLY NEED. D ecentralized and Democratic control over the production and distribution of resources. P hase-out of fossil fuels and false solutions. A global framework for a Just Transition for all to resilient communities.
    51. 56. what they say “ THE SOLUTION TO POLUTION IS DILUTION” what we say “ THE SOLUTION TO POLUTION IS REVOLUTION”
    52. 57. The truth is…corporate control is bad for our health and the health of the planet When we have cut down the last tree, polluted the last river, and cooked the last fish, then we will realize that we can’t eat money! IMAGE: HESPERIAN FOUNDATION
    53. 58. So how do we build a Just Transition ? <ul><li>Resistance : Movement Building for Power </li></ul><ul><li>Resilience : To survive and thrive through ecological transition </li></ul><ul><li>Restoration: Return to the web of life what has been forced into the chain of the market; and allow for planetary systems to heal </li></ul><ul><li>Re-imagine : To weave an irresistible, transformative narrative of how we could live. </li></ul>

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