Asset-Based Coaching
Using Strengths and Coaching Strategies to Assist
Consumers in Defining and Reaching Their Vocational...
Michele Martin
• Career Development
Facilitator Instructor
• 15+ years in career and
workforce development
• Work with Dis...
Agenda
 Why Asset-based Planning and Coaching?
 Coaching vs. Case Management
 The G.R.O.W. Coaching Model
 Asset-based...
Slides and Info At:
 www.michelemmartin.com/wfd
Why Asset-Based?
 Experiences and patterns of
thinking “wire” the brain
 Neural plasticity—you CAN teach
an old dog new tricks!
 What we...
Your brain on negativity
“It won’t
work”
“Why bother?”
“Yes, but”
“I’m a failure”
“I can’t”
The Rider and the Elephant
Stereotype Threat
 Certain roles carry
negative stereotypes
 Activating negative
stereotypes has
negative impact on
perf...
When we focus on “challenges”
 Increases
 Frustration
 Helplessness
 Focus on “what’s wrong with me.” –Shame!
 Sense ...
When we focus on assets:
 See ourselves as “whole,” capable people.
 Helps us see opportunities and strengths.
 We acce...
Coaching vs. Case Management
Key Differences
Traditional Case Management
 Roles—CM as
“expert”/instructor
 Goals—Find barriers to
employment, “place”...
Case Manager as Hero
 “I know the answers. Follow
me.”
 “I will take care of you.”
 “Just do what I say.”
 Reinforces ...
Doing TO
(Case management)
Doing WITH
(Coaching)
Neglect Doing FOR
(Case management)
SUPPORT
EXPECTATIONS
Typical “Feel” of Case
Management Appointment
 Usually one-on-one.
 Case manager does most of the talking and note-takin...
Typical “Feel” of a
Coaching Appointment
 Structured use of peer, team and one-on-one coaching, based
on purpose and need...
Benefits of Coaching
 Job seeker sees him/herself as an expert in his/her own life.
 Job seeker “owns” his/her plans and...
The Asset-Based Coach
The Coaching Process. . .
 Working in partnership with customer
 Takes a complete look at customer’s current
situation, ...
Coach’s Responsibilities
 Believe that every customer is
creative, resourceful and whole
 Discover, clarify and align wi...
Getting Started. . .
Things to Consider. . .
 How do you build trust/rapport with your customer?
 How do you create an environment of “co-cre...
“Hosting” the Space
 Be mindful!
 Physical arrangement of space
 Being “present”
 Greetings
 “Soft start-up”
Setting Expectations
 Roles—What is your role and what is the customer’s role in
this process?
 Responsibilities—What ar...
Typical Coaching Session
 Review progress so far
 Agree on goal(s) for the session
 Work on that goal through questions...
The GROW Model
G.R.O.W Coaching Model
 Goal—What do you want?
 Reality—What is happening now?
 Options—What could you do?
 Will—What ...
Goals
 Define goal/outcomes to be achieved
 “What would you like to accomplish in our work together?”
 “What would you ...
Reality
 What is the current reality in relation to goals?
 “What is happening now with that?”
 “What is the result of ...
Options
 Explore potential options, first with questions:
 “What have you tried so far?”
 “What else could you do here?...
Will
 Help your customer commit to specific action.
 “Now that we’ve discussed your goals and some options, which of
the...
Tips for Implementing GROW
 Goals/Reality/Options steps aren’t linear—leave
room to circle around those steps and to furt...
Building on GROW
Tips for Building Rapport
 Listen with intention
 Relate your own experiences and stories.
 Practice “generous listenin...
Tips for Setting Goals
 Ask what they want to work on and why they want it—help
them explore not just what, but WHY they ...
Tips for Giving Feedback
 Focus on strengths, what the customer has done well—how
can they build on this?
 Ask what cust...
Using “Challenges”
 A challenge is a powerful request that asks the client to extend
beyond self-limiting beliefs.
 Incl...
Using Experiments
 Position actions as “experiments”—things to “try out” and learn
from.
 Start small and build.
 ActR...
Coaching Tools & Strategies
Vision Boards
Vision Board Prompts
 What is my ideal life?
 What is my ideal career?
 What is most important to me in this world?
 W...
Inspirational Interviewing
What You Focus On Grows
 What’s wrong here?
 What are the
barriers/obstacles?
 What isn’t working?
 What weaknesses do...
Questions for a Positive Future
 “This is my ideal life. . . “
 What do you want MORE of in your life?
 If success were...
Positive Planning Questions
 What is working that you can build on?
 How is your life getting better? How can we
bring m...
Agreements
Goal-Setting
Evaluating Progress
Journaling
Daily Question
“What one thing can I do today, no
matter how small, to move me in the
direction of. . . “
Reframe Experiences
What’s the Story?
 “This is a challenge.”
 “This shouldn’t be
happening.”
 “I can’t do this.”
 “This is an opportunity...
Reframing Questions
 What can I learn from this?
 Who do I know who has
handled this well and what
can I learn from him/...
Career Mastermind Groups
 Purpose: Provide ongoing accountability, ideas, support,
resources, trouble-shooting, learning....
Benefits of Group Coaching
 Increased probability of achieving goals
 Distribution of obstacles
 Collective wisdom and ...
Tips on Group Coaching
 Make it different—this is NOT “training”—this is doing!
 Help job seekers own the discussion:
 ...
Next Steps. . .
 Observe yourself—how are you acting as a case manager?
How are you acting as a coach?
 What is ONE stra...
Asset-Based Coaching: Using Strengths and Coaching Strategies to Assist Job Seekers
Asset-Based Coaching: Using Strengths and Coaching Strategies to Assist Job Seekers
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Asset-Based Coaching: Using Strengths and Coaching Strategies to Assist Job Seekers

743 views

Published on

Individual and group coaching strategies that inspire and motivate job seekers.

0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
743
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
13
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
13
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Extensive brain research indicates that what we think about and do on a regular basis actually wires our brains. Our thoughts and actions create new neural pathways and can wear deep grooves in our brains. We can re-wire the brain when we learn new skills or patterns of thought, but this has to be intentional.
  • When we are focused on the negative, this tends to reinforce negative thinking patterns—it creates patterns of learned helplessness, where we believe that our actions don’t have an impact in the world so we don’t even try. We will focus first on challenges and then these will seem so overwhelming that we give up on working with anything else. For people with disabilities, this can be an especially powerful “bad habit” depending on their previous experiences.
  • Vision Boards—can be done on poster board or smaller sheets of sturdy paper
    Respond to a prompt (see next slide)—cut out images, words, etc. from magazines. Can add their own drawings, writing, words, pictures that they’ve taken, etc. Idea is to customize and use images to respond to the question.
    After customer completes, have them tell you the story of the board—what do the images represent? What do they say about what the person is looking for? Is there any significance to how the images are arranged? What can this tell you about the person’s dreams, aspirations, etc.
    Let the customer do most of the talking—you ask questions to draw out more details.
    Use the vision board as an aid to planning and as ongoing inspiration—suggest that the customer display it in a prominent place in their home where they can be reminded daily of what they’re working toward. Encourage them to share with their support network—family, friends, etc.
  • These are possible vision board prompts—people can do more than one or you can work with them to find the best one.
  • Another way to help someone focus on dreams and aspirations is through positive interviews. This is a technique where we use positive questions to draw out what inspires and motivates the customer.
  • As we’ve discussed, what you focus on grows in someone’s mind—the question starts you thinking in particular positive or negative directions. Notice the difference in how the mind starts flowing depending on whether you work with the questions on the left or the right.
  • Turn the normal interview you do into a positive interview by asking different questions—start with questions that will inspire, engage, and motivate. These are questions that help someone envision an ideal future. They can help you get at their dreams.
    Have group suggest other questions that could be asked as part of a positive interview format.
  • Journals are another great tool for reflection—can be written or visual. People can use collage, drawings, pictures they’ve taken, etc. to do a journal entry.
    Journals can also be audio or video—the person can record themselves talking about an experience.
    Any of the positive questions we’ve discussed can be used as a journaling prompt. We’ll be discussing more potential prompts when we talk about building positive habits with people in a few minutes.
    Journaling is a great thing to do after a particular experience—a job interview, to reflect on what they liked in their work day, etc. It’s a good ongoing habit to get into.
    Small wins journals—helps track progress, see
  • This is a daily reminder to do something to move toward dreams or goals—each day the person asks this question, based on what will be happening in that day. So it might be that on one day, it’s making a phone call to someone who might be able to help with the goal. Another day it could be paying attention to what the person enjoys in their work day so that they can be clearer about the kind of work they like to do.
  • Another good habit is to start helping people learn how to reframe their experiences from the negative to the positive. This can be a powerful way to begin re-shaping thinking patterns.
  • Help customers see the stories they are telling about their experience—How can you shift from negative language and questions to more positive ways of looking at experiences.
  • These are examples of some re-framing questions you can use with customers to have them explore what’s going on in a different light.
  • Asset-Based Coaching: Using Strengths and Coaching Strategies to Assist Job Seekers

    1. 1. Asset-Based Coaching Using Strengths and Coaching Strategies to Assist Consumers in Defining and Reaching Their Vocational Goals Presented by Michele Martin, The Bamboo Project, Inc. CCERI/MHANJ—June 24, 2014
    2. 2. Michele Martin • Career Development Facilitator Instructor • 15+ years in career and workforce development • Work with DiscoverAbilityNJ, Kessler Foundation, Family Resource Network, Rutgers University School of Social Work
    3. 3. Agenda  Why Asset-based Planning and Coaching?  Coaching vs. Case Management  The G.R.O.W. Coaching Model  Asset-based Tools & Strategies
    4. 4. Slides and Info At:  www.michelemmartin.com/wfd
    5. 5. Why Asset-Based?
    6. 6.  Experiences and patterns of thinking “wire” the brain  Neural plasticity—you CAN teach an old dog new tricks!  What we focus on, grows Your Brain
    7. 7. Your brain on negativity “It won’t work” “Why bother?” “Yes, but” “I’m a failure” “I can’t”
    8. 8. The Rider and the Elephant
    9. 9. Stereotype Threat  Certain roles carry negative stereotypes  Activating negative stereotypes has negative impact on performance
    10. 10. When we focus on “challenges”  Increases  Frustration  Helplessness  Focus on “what’s wrong with me.” –Shame!  Sense of social isolation—I’m different in a “bad” way  Decreases  Ability to act  Sense of possibilities and solutions  Learning!
    11. 11. When we focus on assets:  See ourselves as “whole,” capable people.  Helps us see opportunities and strengths.  We access the positive emotions that inspire action.  We can learn from experiences.
    12. 12. Coaching vs. Case Management
    13. 13. Key Differences Traditional Case Management  Roles—CM as “expert”/instructor  Goals—Find barriers to employment, “place” job seeker  Strategies—One-on-One, CM gives instructions for job seeker to follow, CM works to control the process. Coaching  Roles—Coach as partner/facilitator  Goals—Find and build on strengths, build job seeker skills and support team for ongoing career development.  Strategies—Group and 1-on- 1, dialogue, helping job seeker problem-solve
    14. 14. Case Manager as Hero  “I know the answers. Follow me.”  “I will take care of you.”  “Just do what I say.”  Reinforces rescuer/victim dynamic.
    15. 15. Doing TO (Case management) Doing WITH (Coaching) Neglect Doing FOR (Case management) SUPPORT EXPECTATIONS
    16. 16. Typical “Feel” of Case Management Appointment  Usually one-on-one.  Case manager does most of the talking and note-taking— instructions and directions.  Emphasis on barriers, following CM instructions, completing organizational paperwork and requirements.  More “telling” than asking/listening.  Organization-centered, rather than person-centered.
    17. 17. Typical “Feel” of a Coaching Appointment  Structured use of peer, team and one-on-one coaching, based on purpose and needs.  Coach asks questions, provides feedback, follows lead of job seeker.  Job seeker “leads” discussion, takes notes.  Building from strengths as reference point.  Focus on developing career planning/management skills and habits and on creating a support system of people and resources.
    18. 18. Benefits of Coaching  Job seeker sees him/herself as an expert in his/her own life.  Job seeker “owns” his/her plans and actions  Increases sense of self-efficacy and self-esteem.  Builds skills and independence  Expands support network—less reliance on case manager to “fix” things.
    19. 19. The Asset-Based Coach
    20. 20. The Coaching Process. . .  Working in partnership with customer  Takes a complete look at customer’s current situation, including their assumptions/perceptions about their work, themselves and others.  Helps them set relevant goals based on their own nature and needs.  Helps them take relevant actions toward achieving their goals.  Helps them learn by continuing to reflect on their actions and providing feedback on what is/isn’t working.
    21. 21. Coach’s Responsibilities  Believe that every customer is creative, resourceful and whole  Discover, clarify and align with what the job seeker wants to achieve.  Encourage and support customer self-discovery  Elicit customer-generated solutions and strategies  Hold customer accountable and responsible Source: International Coach Federation
    22. 22. Getting Started. . .
    23. 23. Things to Consider. . .  How do you build trust/rapport with your customer?  How do you create an environment of “co-creation” and partnership?  How do you structure your conversations and activities to support a coaching approach?
    24. 24. “Hosting” the Space  Be mindful!  Physical arrangement of space  Being “present”  Greetings  “Soft start-up”
    25. 25. Setting Expectations  Roles—What is your role and what is the customer’s role in this process?  Responsibilities—What are you responsible for and what is the customer responsible for?  Process/Structure  Overall  Individual sessions—GROW  Agreements  Spells out roles, responsibilities and how you want to work together. Can include timeframes, goals, etc.
    26. 26. Typical Coaching Session  Review progress so far  Agree on goal(s) for the session  Work on that goal through questions, exercises, etc.  Reflect on insights  Develop action plan—next steps and time frame.
    27. 27. The GROW Model
    28. 28. G.R.O.W Coaching Model  Goal—What do you want?  Reality—What is happening now?  Options—What could you do?  Will—What will you do?
    29. 29. Goals  Define goal/outcomes to be achieved  “What would you like to accomplish in our work together?”  “What would you like to accomplish in this session?”  “What’s important to you in this?”  “What would success look like to you?”  Identify visible signs  “How will you know that you’ve achieved that goal? What will be different? “  “How will you know that the problem is solved?”
    30. 30. Reality  What is the current reality in relation to goals?  “What is happening now with that?”  “What is the result of that?”  “Who else is involved? How are they involved?”  “How are you feeling about all this?”
    31. 31. Options  Explore potential options, first with questions:  “What have you tried so far?”  “What else could you do here?”  “Have you dealt with something similar before? Could we borrow from that now?”  Then with your own suggestions:  “Have you tried. . .?”  “Something that has worked for other people is. . . “  “What do you think about trying . . . ?”  “Can we build on something you said earlier and try. . . ?”  “I’d like to try something with you if you’re OK with it. . .”
    32. 32. Will  Help your customer commit to specific action.  “Now that we’ve discussed your goals and some options, which of these do you want to try?”  How will this action help you achieve your goal?  “What steps do you need to take on this before our next meeting?”  “What’s one small thing you could do to move this forward?  “What help do you need from other people, including me?”  “Do you anticipate any problems making this happen? How can you deal with those problems?”  “Do you have any fears or concerns about taking this action? How can we address those?”
    33. 33. Tips for Implementing GROW  Goals/Reality/Options steps aren’t linear—leave room to circle around those steps and to further clarify.  End with Will step—what can the customer agree to do? What will you do? What will his/her team do?  Focus on asking questions, effective listening and helping the customer clarify responses, better understand his/her goals and motivations.  Watch your impulse to tell the person what to do.  Use silence—leave space for thinking.
    34. 34. Building on GROW
    35. 35. Tips for Building Rapport  Listen with intention  Relate your own experiences and stories.  Practice “generous listening”—what is the honorable intent in what the customer is saying?  Ask for feedback on your own performance—what can you improve?  Admit failures and mistakes—and share what you’ve learned from the experience.  Exhibit your trust in the customer and in his/her skills and strengths.
    36. 36. Tips for Setting Goals  Ask what they want to work on and why they want it—help them explore not just what, but WHY they want something.  Tie goals to values—what’s important to this person? (Not what “SHOULD” be important, but what IS important).  Help customer summarize the problem or issue in one simple sentence.  Use pictures to represent goals and action steps (similar to vision boarding)
    37. 37. Tips for Giving Feedback  Focus on strengths, what the customer has done well—how can they build on this?  Ask what customer has learned from the experience and how it might impact future behavior.  Connect to customer values, goals and priorities—how did an action impact these?  Work on suspending judgment about what customer “should” do or how he/she “should” be. Help them with what is.
    38. 38. Using “Challenges”  A challenge is a powerful request that asks the client to extend beyond self-limiting beliefs.  Includes a specific action and a date/time for completion.  Clients can respond with yes/no or counter-offer  Examples  “I challenge you to finish that resume by tomorrow morning”  “I challenge you to find three job openings that interest you by Wednesday.”
    39. 39. Using Experiments  Position actions as “experiments”—things to “try out” and learn from.  Start small and build.  ActReflectAct  Debrief—what happened? How did that feel? What did you learn from that experience that you can use in the future?  “What can you try next?”
    40. 40. Coaching Tools & Strategies
    41. 41. Vision Boards
    42. 42. Vision Board Prompts  What is my ideal life?  What is my ideal career?  What is most important to me in this world?  What am I passionate about—what do I love doing?  What inspires me?  What are my greatest strengths? What am I really good at?  What are my roles in life and what is important to me in those roles?
    43. 43. Inspirational Interviewing
    44. 44. What You Focus On Grows  What’s wrong here?  What are the barriers/obstacles?  What isn’t working?  What weaknesses do I need to overcome?  Why isn’t this working?  What is working/has worked in the past?  What opportunities do we see?  What do I want more of?  What is my positive core that I can build on?
    45. 45. Questions for a Positive Future  “This is my ideal life. . . “  What do you want MORE of in your life?  If success were absolutely guaranteed, what risks would you take?  What are you excited about in your life right now?  What would a perfect job look like?  What do people always come to you for? What do you you think you do really well?
    46. 46. Positive Planning Questions  What is working that you can build on?  How is your life getting better? How can we bring more of that into your experience?  Think of a similar situation you handled well. What made it a success and how could we bring that learning to this situation?  What changes could we make, no matter how small, that would make your experience more enjoyable, effective and/or productive?
    47. 47. Agreements
    48. 48. Goal-Setting
    49. 49. Evaluating Progress
    50. 50. Journaling
    51. 51. Daily Question “What one thing can I do today, no matter how small, to move me in the direction of. . . “
    52. 52. Reframe Experiences
    53. 53. What’s the Story?  “This is a challenge.”  “This shouldn’t be happening.”  “I can’t do this.”  “This is an opportunity.”  “This should be happening because it’s teaching me something.”  I can do this—I just need to learn now”
    54. 54. Reframing Questions  What can I learn from this?  Who do I know who has handled this well and what can I learn from him/her?  How will my life be better after I’ve worked through this?  What are my greatest strengths and how can I use them to help me work through this?  What am I excited or curious about in this?  What am I grateful for in all of this?
    55. 55. Career Mastermind Groups  Purpose: Provide ongoing accountability, ideas, support, resources, trouble-shooting, learning.  Facilitated and co-created by members.  Staff provide structure, support, ideas  Focus is on:  Goals for the week  Progress  Troubleshooting  Just-in-time learning
    56. 56. Benefits of Group Coaching  Increased probability of achieving goals  Distribution of obstacles  Collective wisdom and multiple perspectives  Resource sharing  Diffusion of stress  Accelerated motivation  Support & challenge
    57. 57. Tips on Group Coaching  Make it different—this is NOT “training”—this is doing!  Help job seekers own the discussion:  What problems/issues do they want to work on?  Encourage them to engage with each other, to ask questions, give feedback  Discourage turning to you as the “expert.”  Watch for coachable “aha” moments—call attention to them with the group.  Help them stay on track--avoid black hole discussions.  Finish with an action—”I will. . . “
    58. 58. Next Steps. . .  Observe yourself—how are you acting as a case manager? How are you acting as a coach?  What is ONE strategy you can experiment with?  Talk with colleagues—how could you work together to try out these strategies and learn from them?  What are YOUR assets and strengths? How can you build on them to develop yourself as a coach?

    ×