Teacher’s Crimes in the Class 2013                      Teacher’s Crimes in the Class                                   By...
Teacher’s Crimes in the Class 2013Poor personal hygieneIf teachers are so delighted to teach in a well-groomed class, this...
Teacher’s Crimes in the Class 2013       Case No. 3. I remember my former students’ awful story back in his college days. ...
Teacher’s Crimes in the Class 2013I realize in hindsight that I might not have been as clear as I might have been.Negative...
Teacher’s Crimes in the Class 2013  partly responsible for my misbehavior. I was in state of shock about your reaction. I ...
Teacher’s Crimes in the Class 2013              Uses inappropriate teaching-learning materials              Inappropriat...
Teacher’s Crimes in the Class 2013        Surveys, observations, and discussions revealed that in order to achieve a highl...
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SHINAS 5TH ELT WORKSHOP HANDOUT ON CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT

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In most instances, teachers blame students for various untoward interruptions happening in the class. But very rare to realize that some disruptive behaviours are but teacher-caused or made by teachers themselves. While recent principle in education claims that learning operates in an interactive manner, it is undeniably true on the other hand that the teacher himself, being the prime motivator in class plays a major factor in achieving a conducive learning atmosphere. In other words, he is responsible for whatever successes or failures in carrying out such processes primarily because the teacher is viewed as the active stimulus or motivator in learning. Is he more of a reactive or a proactive teacher? Issues about like-- how he conducts himself before his class; how he handles students’ grievances; how he carries out his procedures will help us define the climate of his own classroom and our impression of him as a classroom manager.

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SHINAS 5TH ELT WORKSHOP HANDOUT ON CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT

  1. 1. Teacher’s Crimes in the Class 2013 Teacher’s Crimes in the Class By Michael M. Magbanua, MA ELT ABSTRACT In most instances, teachers blame students for various untoward interruptionshappening in the class. But very rare to realize that some disruptive behaviours are butteacher-caused or made by teachers themselves. While recent principle in educationclaims that learning operates in an interactive manner, it is undeniably true on the otherhand that the teacher himself, being the prime motivator in class plays a major factor inachieving a conducive learning atmosphere. In other words, he is responsible forwhatever successes or failures in carrying out such processes primarily because theteacher is viewed as the active stimulus or motivator in learning. Is he more of a reactiveor a proactive teacher? Issues about like-- how he conducts himself before his class; howhe handles students’ grievances; how he carries out his procedures will help us define theclimate of his own classroom and our impression of him as a classroom manager. OBJECTIVES In a 50-minute session, participants in this workshop are expected to actively-- 1. Identify the 3 A’s of teacher-caused students’ misbehaviours; 2. Evaluate the result of survey on the top five misbehaviours teachers usually commit in class; 3. Propose proactive resolutions for a harmonious teacher-student rapport towards the achievement of a highly-motivating learning atmosphere.The 3 A’s of Teacher-Caused Misbehaviours in Class(Appearance; Attitude; Aptitude) 1. Appearance. This includes the teacher’s uniqueness in projecting himself before his students in class. How does he look? How does he smell? What lasting impression of him his own students can create while lesson is in progress? Handout developed by Michael M. Magbanua, MA ELT (Al Musannah College of Technology) 1 of 6 for the 5th Annual ELT Workshop “Classroom Management: The Untold Stories” organized by Shinas College of Technology, Sultanate of Oman
  2. 2. Teacher’s Crimes in the Class 2013Poor personal hygieneIf teachers are so delighted to teach in a well-groomed class, this is even true to students.Surely, you can still remember your teacher who habitually comes in class on his obnoxiousperfume scent, or on his peculiar built-in bad odor, or worse is killing you softly with hissuffocating halitosis!The daily routine of brushing your teeth, washing your body and applying deodorant mightseem cumbersome at times, especially when youre in rush. But hygiene plays a much biggerpart than just making you look presentable before your students. Aside from the fact thatgood hygiene protects you from illness and disease, and it affects the way you feel aboutyourself and other people feel about you.Now, it is not so surprising if there were instances a student doesn’t feel like to clarify hisconfusions with the teacher face to face simply because of this matter. The reason—he cannotdeliberately stomach the teacher’s built-in killing scent!Bad groomingLike maintaining proper hygiene, personal grooming is equally important for a positive self-image; hence, every teacher has to exert major effort to look pleasing and attractive inappearance. Next time, try to double check your look for the day. Do not give your studentsany inch to ruin your class because they burst to laugh at each other implicitly or explicitly.Admit it or not, maintaining proper grooming speaks about your sense of professionalism,level of sophistication, your credibility or even your intelligence. Make sure you are clean allover-- your hair is neat and brushed well, clear face, clean teeth and nails, evenly shavedfacial hair, wear neat and appropriate dress. Teacher may not be aware of this but studentsat times laugh at each other in the middle of serious classroom preaching, or explaininggrammar rules simply because of petty thing—you burped. You got dark chocolate or morselof fried chicken stuck in between your teeth, over make-ups, stripped underarm, or worse isyou farted!Here are real life situations which students normally experience with their teacher in class.Case No. 1. Students’ obnoxious comment like:“In as much as I loved to ask him privately further details about my confusion to the justconcluded lesson, I couldn’t because I cannot stomach his bad breath and his body odor!”Case No. 2. One teacher boasted her newly-purchased body spray. She tried spraying itbefore her class. Suddenly, a late comer came in and exclaimed, “At last, we finally changedour air freshener… hey, but why it has to be guava-scented?” Handout developed by Michael M. Magbanua, MA ELT (Al Musannah College of Technology) 2 of 6 for the 5th Annual ELT Workshop “Classroom Management: The Untold Stories” organized by Shinas College of Technology, Sultanate of Oman
  3. 3. Teacher’s Crimes in the Class 2013 Case No. 3. I remember my former students’ awful story back in his college days. While his professor was so engrossed about his lesson (it was so evident that his professor was really prepared), buzz of chuckles interrupted his lecture. This uncontrolled noise turned louder as the gospel spreads out in the entire class. Anxious about the fuss, he asked. That very moment, no one had the bone to tell him about it not until one concern classmate gestured that his fly was scandalously open! Can you imagine how disastrous would a classroom be if a teacher is unmindful of the basics of having personal hygiene? It may be simple as it seems; however, if neglected, may resort to student’s disappointment of his impression of the teacher. Similarly, teacher’s bad grooming usually turns into instant classroom blooper and needlessly disrupts a class. 2. Attitude. Teacher’s attitude is his driving force that affects his outlook about the world. This refers to his thoughts, feelings, or set of values system. His attitude clearly reflects his character too. If a teacher has a negative attitude towards the system, his job or his students, this will certainly lead to negative influence over matters. How’s the response of the teacher if student’s misbehaviour surfaces? How does he manage his own temper? Does he normally fuse to fierce? How objective is he in handling disruptive behaviours on his class? Can he still maintain relax composure in the midst of untoward circumstances? As most teachers agree, disruptive misbehaviours occasionally occur in a class. Nevertheless, the teacher, being the authoritative figure in the class should be equipped of various efficient win-win approaches so to achieve a non-threatening learning atmosphere. In one blog, “Teacher with a bad attitude”, (http://badteacher.wordpress.com/), the blogger shared his own mistake and realization--But in the meantime, some housekeeping. About a year ago, I wrote about having had enough, andlooking to make the switch to senior high school. I wrote about my frustrations, and of newchallenges I might meet in senior high, and even shared some of these with my principal.This passage might have set some people off. Well, I know it did judging by the comments.On the other hand, junior high kids, day in, day out, do leave their mark. I’m tired of the fuckheadswho should be in jail, who don’t want to be in school, or who love nothing more than to interrupt thelearning of their classmates.To which Posh replied (via commentary):You obviously don’t belong teaching. This is EXACTLY why I sent my kid to private her whole life. Toavoid losers like you who take up teaching and don’t belong. Handout developed by Michael M. Magbanua, MA ELT (Al Musannah College of Technology) 3 of 6 for the 5th Annual ELT Workshop “Classroom Management: The Untold Stories” organized by Shinas College of Technology, Sultanate of Oman
  4. 4. Teacher’s Crimes in the Class 2013I realize in hindsight that I might not have been as clear as I might have been.Negative Attitudes of Teachers. Considering different variables, classroom teachers, accordingto survey has the tendency to be— 1. so unenthusiastic rather than enthusiastic (boring, dull, dry, gloomy, depressed, aimless...) 2. a dictator rather than a diplomat (tormentor, autocratic, tyrant…) 3. a discourager rather than an encourager (negative, demeaning, humiliating, condemning…) 4. so provocative rather than conciliatory (confrontational, challenging, tactless, offensive…) 5. intimidating rather than approachable (threatening, nerve-racking, loud, unreceptive...) 6. unprofessional rather than professional (indecent, rude, impolite, ill-mannered…) 7. a reporter rather than a secretary (gossiper, confides confidential matters, critical…) 8. too edgy rather than tolerant (short-tempered; quick to anger; too impatient…) 9. bias rather than fair (unfair, unreasonable, unjust…) 10. inconsiderate rather than considerate (insensitive, unforgiving, uncaring, indifferent...) Case No. 1. One disappointed student lamented about how his so negative teacher on the very first day of the class prophesying, ““The way I look at you in this class, I think only few will pass in this course and majority will certainly fail.” Case No. 2. “I was so worried about passing her course when we had a heated argument in class. I was just pointing out my own way of arriving at the final result. Surprisingly the teacher was so furious about my point. She didn’t like to acknowledge my shorter method where in fact we arrived on the same answer. Later, I realized I shouldn’t had argued in such confronting manner, but what surprised even more was her furious response to the extent that we had wasted time debating over the matter.” Case No. 3. One apologetic student dropped a note on her teacher’s table one time— explaining: “I am so sorry for making you mad in class this morning. Swear to God I didn’t mean to provoke you to anger nor insult you. I just couldn’t get over with a very hilarious story my seatmate was telling me while you were discussing that diagram. I admit that I was Handout developed by Michael M. Magbanua, MA ELT (Al Musannah College of Technology) 4 of 6 for the 5th Annual ELT Workshop “Classroom Management: The Untold Stories” organized by Shinas College of Technology, Sultanate of Oman
  5. 5. Teacher’s Crimes in the Class 2013 partly responsible for my misbehavior. I was in state of shock about your reaction. I tried to explain yet you ignored me.” In various instances, and in countless times, teacher’s temper is always challenged. This may mean a chaotic class; an unruly or mentally-challenging student will be an effective acid test of its foolproof. While it is true that teachers are human—capable of outraging emotion so to speak, he is still a professional individual who needs to manage his temper more objectively. Conscious of this reduces the tendency of disagreements that normally spoil class hours or demoralize students’ self-image.3. Aptitude. Aptitude refers to teacher’s knowledge, skill, ability, capability, facility, competency, talent, proficiency, mastery, experience, and expertise in any undertaking. Hence, all these speak about his performance in class. Students, like teacher’s supervisors expect a general level of competency in almost all the criteria stated on student’s feedback form. That why, in some instances, teachers receive a surprising mark of C (or even below). For what reason, let’s look at what students say— Case No. 1. “My teacher is always confused with the grammar rules. He couldn’t give us clear explanation about our own confusions. Sometimes, a smart classmate in the class can explains more accurate than his.” Case No. 2. “She seems always cramming in the class. Much time is wasted because she left important things at her office—her class record, her book, her markers, etc. When she’s out, the class turns unruly…” Case No. 3. “We easily get bored on his class. Nothing new. His voice lulls us to sleep. He likes to give us plenty of worksheets but we never answered or checked them all.” Contrary to the ideal criteria for evaluating a teacher’s performance, student’s disappointed comments include—  Unclear or ambiguous oral and written instructions  Limited, inaccurate, and disorganized knowledge of the subject matter Handout developed by Michael M. Magbanua, MA ELT (Al Musannah College of Technology) 5 of 6 for the 5th Annual ELT Workshop “Classroom Management: The Untold Stories” organized by Shinas College of Technology, Sultanate of Oman
  6. 6. Teacher’s Crimes in the Class 2013  Uses inappropriate teaching-learning materials  Inappropriate teaching methodology as far as student’s intelligence is concern  Has gross speech problems—stuttering; strong accent; mispronounced words; high- pitched; too slow; monotonous; intimidating  Circuitious—takes time to simplify complex concepts  Bookish --inability to relate lessons in real life situations or context  Doesn’t teach prerequisite skills  Inaccurate updates and other important announcements  Inconsistent or inaccurate student’s record such as attendance, marks, etc.  Gives homework too much but never evaluates  Comes to class late but dismisses early or overtimes  Inaccurate marking of papers  Too much story-telling than teaching  Worn-out classroom activities—no variations  Has disorganized presentation or procedures  Poor penmanship and board management  Stationary or hyperactive – has exclusive spot in the room or always in mobile  Has unmanaged mannerisms—verbal and nonverbal  Inability to use simple tools, equipment, printed materials or technology aides in class  Has no originality—lacks innovation; no self-made teaching-learning materials  Monopolizes the class discussion—poor dynamic student-teacher interaction “Teacher-caused” disruptions brought by any of these deficiencies may create negativeimpression to a teacher’s professional competence. Now should this happen, students develop lack ofinterest, get disappointed. This may lead to low academic achievement, poor attendance, ordisruptive behaviours in class. SUMMARY Handout developed by Michael M. Magbanua, MA ELT (Al Musannah College of Technology) 6 of 6 for the 5th Annual ELT Workshop “Classroom Management: The Untold Stories” organized by Shinas College of Technology, Sultanate of Oman
  7. 7. Teacher’s Crimes in the Class 2013 Surveys, observations, and discussions revealed that in order to achieve a highly-motivatingatmosphere in class, a devoted teacher has to reflect about his own appearance, his attitude, and hisaptitude. All these three matter most to his students. Handout developed by Michael M. Magbanua, MA ELT (Al Musannah College of Technology) 7 of 6 for the 5th Annual ELT Workshop “Classroom Management: The Untold Stories” organized by Shinas College of Technology, Sultanate of Oman

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