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Sutton - KM Australia Presentn - Gamification in KM Initiatives V3-R1

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Sutton - KM Australia Presentn - Gamification in KM Initiatives V3-R1

  1. 1. DR. MICHAEL SUTTON, PHD, ADMA, CMC, ISP, MIT ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, EDUCATIONAL THAUMATURGIST & EDUPRENEUR WESTMINSTER COLLEGE, SALT LAKE CITY, UT, USA Gamification in Knowledge Management Initiatives 2015 Knowledge Management Australia, Melbourne, Victoria • Wizened Ol’ Fart, Designer and Player in Gamification, Serious Games, and Simulations • msutton@westminstercollege.edu michaeljdsutton@gmail.com
  2. 2. 8. What are the Primary Types of Game Players? 9. What Comprises a Gamification Model? 10. Why Gamification and Knowledge Management? 11. What KM Processes are Involved? 12. Stakeholder Benefit from Serious Games and Simulations in KM Initiatives 13. Parting Remarks 14. Wrap Up & Discussion 1. What Is Gamification? 2. What is the Science Behind Gamification? 3. What Is a Gamification Framework? 4. What Challenges Suggest Gamification? 5. What are the Drivers for Gamification? 6. Why Use Gamification in KM Initiatives? 7. Exemplars of Intra-Generational Gamification Agenda 2015 KM Australia Conference 2
  3. 3. Starting Shots… 2015 KM Australia Conference 3
  4. 4. Michael’s Story RE: Gamification [1] http://datagenetics.com/blog/march52012/index.html http://newyorkdailyphoto.com/nydppress/?p=1332 2015 KM Australia Conference 4
  5. 5. Michael’s Story RE: Gamification [2] 2015 KM Australia Conference 5
  6. 6. Michael’s Story RE: Gamification [3] 2015 KM Australia Conference 6
  7. 7. Michael’s Story RE: Gamification [4] 2015 KM Australia Conference 7
  8. 8. • ADG Creative: Gamification—Good for Business [PLAY VIDEO] <<<< • “Gamification is the process of taking something that already exists – a website, an enterprise application, an online community – and integrating game mechanics into it to motivate participation, engagement, and loyalty.” • “Gamification applies the data-driven techniques that game designers use to engage players to non-game experiences to motivate actions that add value to your business.” What Is Gamification? [1] Bunchball,SanMateo,CA,USA(http://www.bunchball.com/gamification) 2015 KM Australia Conference 8
  9. 9. • Drives higher sales, stronger collaboration, better ROI, deeper loyalty, and higher customer satisfaction through increased high-value interactions with customers, employees, and partners. • Applies any combination of these techniques to accomplish business [and learning] goals. • Not about creating something new; but the results are unique. • Integration of the motivational techniques that make games so engaging. • Built upon game mechanics proven to motivate and engage users/learners. What Is Gamification? [2] Bunchball,SanMateo,CA,USA(http://www.bunchball.com/gamification) 2015 KM Australia Conference 9
  10. 10. • Craft, science, and art of deriving all the fun and addicting elements found in games and applying them to real-world, learning, or productive activities. • Human-Focused Design • & Learner-Focused Design vs. • Function-Focused Design. • Design process that optimizes for the human/learner in the system, as opposed to pure efficiency of the system. What Is Gamification? [3] From:https://leanpub.com/actionable-gamification-beyond-points-badges-leaderboards 2015 KM Australia Conference 10
  11. 11. • Much more than simply rewarding points and badges. • Understanding, encouraging, and influencing corporate and educational human behaviours. • Founded in the fundamentals of human psychology and behavioral science What is the Science Behind Gamification? Adaptedfrom:Dale,S.(n.d.)EngagementStrategies&Techniques.PresentationatCollabor8Now 2015 KM Australia Conference 11
  12. 12. What Is a Gamification Framework? From:http://www.gameonlab.com/canvas/ 2015 KM Australia Conference 12
  13. 13. What Challenges Suggest Gamification? [1] 2015 KM Australia Conference 13
  14. 14. • IMPLICATIONS: • Capability to complete goals has diminished—significantly affecting • learning, • creativity, • innovation, • efficiency, and • effectiveness • National Center for Biotechnology Information, (U.S. National Lib. of Medicine): • Human attention spanned • 12 sec. in 2000 • 08 sec. in 2013 • Goldfish exhibit an attention span of 9 sec. What Challenges Suggest Gamification? [2] 2015 KM Australia Conference 14
  15. 15. What Challenges Suggest Gamification? [3] From:https://gradireland.wordpress.com/2014/10/31/engaging- generation-y-the-challenge-and-opportunity-for-employers/ 2015 KM Australia Conference 15
  16. 16. What are the Drivers for Gamification? Bunchball(2012).EnterpriseGamification:TheGenYFactor Performance Real-Time Feedback Transparency Goal-setting Achievement Badges Leveling Up On-boarding and Mastery Social Interaction Competition Teams & Collaboration 2015 KM Australia Conference 16 “People will spend hours playing games, but won’t spend minutes on anything that feels like training.”
  17. 17. Why Use Gamification in KM Initiatives? [1] Adaptedfrom:http://12most.com/2012/03/13/12-striking-tendencies-creative-people/ 2015 KM Australia Conference 17
  18. 18. Why Use Gamification in KM Initiatives? [2] From:http://www.gartner.com/newsroom/id/2575515 2015 KM Australia Conference 18
  19. 19. • 80% of current gamified applications will fail to meet business objectives primarily due to poor design • (Source: Gartner) • Projected gamification growth to reach $5B (£3B) by 2018. • (Source: Mind Commerce) • Over 1,400 global organizations will deploy gamification applications for employee performance, healthcare, marketing and training by 2014. • (Source: Gartner) Why Use Gamification in KM Initiatives? [3] Adaptedfrom:Dale,S.(n.d.)EngagementStrategies&Techniques.PresentationatCollabor8Now Business Value Proposition for Funification (Gamification within KM) 2015 KM Australia Conference 19
  20. 20. Microsoft Ribbon Hero 2: Onboarding/ Mastery Application Exemplars of Intra-Generational Gamification [1] Bunchball(2012).EnterpriseGamification:TheGenYFactor.p.6 2015 KM Australia Conference 20
  21. 21. • Microsoft Ribbon Hero 2: Gamification Elements • Real-time Feedback: provides instantaneous visual and audible feedback on your actions • Transparency: score and progress on challenges displayed at any time. • Goal Setting: Long-term goal (help Clippy get a job) and several short-term goals (fix Clippy’s resume). • Missions are split into several levels, themed by different eras in time. Exemplars of Intra-Generational Gamification [2] Bunchball(2012).EnterpriseGamification:TheGenYFactor.p.6 2015 KM Australia Conference 21
  22. 22. • Microsoft Ribbon Hero 2: Gamification Elements (cont’d) • Badges: completion of missions clearly marked on the main pages. • Leveling Up: skill level increases with completed missions. • Onboarding & Mastery: “gamers” exposed to key pieces of functionality and enabled to master key pieces of functionality. Exemplars of Intra-Generational Gamification [2] Bunchball(2012).EnterpriseGamification:TheGenYFactor.p.6 2015 KM Australia Conference 22
  23. 23. • Planet Jockey: Emotional Intelligence Upskilling for Emerging Leaders Exemplars of Intra-Generational Gamification [3] www.PlanetJockey.com 2015 KM Australia Conference 23
  24. 24. Planet Jockey: Emotional Intelligence Upskilling for Emerging Leaders • GAME MODULES: • Building and developing a high performance team • Setting targeted goals • Inspiring your team and achieving real commitment • Overcoming setbacks, problems, and competition • Igniting your following and inspiring real change Exemplars of Intra-Generational Gamification [3] www.planetjockey.com 2015 KM Australia Conference 24
  25. 25. • Planet Jockey: Emotional Intelligence Upskilling for Emerging Leaders • Real-time Feedback: provides instantaneous visual and audible feedback on your actions • Transparency: score and progress on challenges displayed at any time. • Goal Setting: Long-term goal (lead the firm) and several short-term goals (soft-skills competencies through increased EI)…Missions = 5 modules. • Badges: completion of missions clearly marked on the main pages. Exemplars of Intra-Generational Gamification [3] 2015 KM Australia Conference 25
  26. 26. • Planet Jockey: Emotional Intelligence Upskilling for Emerging Leaders (cont’d) • Leveling Up: skill level increases with completed missions. • Onboarding & Mastery: “gamers” exposed to key elements of EI, while having fun and competing against themselves and others. • Competition: leaderboard displays participant ranking. • Team & Collaborations: participants may choose to coach team members Exemplars of Intra-Generational Gamification [3] 2015 KM Australia Conference 26
  27. 27. What are the Primary Types of Game Players? From:https://www.behance.net/gallery/Graduation-Thesis-Leveling-up-Facebook-Apps/5383819 2015 KM Australia Conference 27
  28. 28. What Comprises a Gamification Model? http://ivanteh-runningman.blogspot.com/2015/04/gamification-of-learning.html 2015 KM Australia Conference 28
  29. 29. • Straits Knowledge: KM Planning Toolkit • Knowledge Management Planning Canvas • KM Diagnostic Cards • Organisation Culture Cards • KM Method Cards and • KM Approaches Methods and Tools Guidebook Why Gamification and Knowledge Management? [1] From:http://www.straitsknowledge.com/store_new/planningtoolkit/ 2015 KM Australia Conference 29
  30. 30. • Bird Island KM Game: • Demonstrating measurable performance improvement through KM Why Gamification and Knowledge Management? [2] From:http://www.knoco.com/Nick%20Milton_Bird%20Island.pdf 2015 KM Australia Conference 30
  31. 31. • FreshBiz Board Game • Based upon best selling book, The New Entrepreneurz • Platform provides an enterprise fun game-based learning experience • Develop and simulate smarter ways of doing business. Why Gamification and Knowledge Management? [3] From:http://www.freshbizgame.com/freshbiz-workshop/ 2015 KM Australia Conference 31
  32. 32. What KM Processes are Involved? From:https://www.cbased.com/en/consultation/wise-leader-von-ikujiro-nonaka/chapter/11786 2015 KM Australia Conference 32
  33. 33. 2015 KM Australia Conference 33 • Intergenerational Stakeholders: • Because so much knowledge transfer is cross-generational, an understanding of different learning styles facilitates the process. • Understanding generational learning preferences can make the difference between merely harvesting knowledge and actually using it. • In most cases, the knowledge provided by a source will need to be adapted to fit the needs of the receiver. • This process may require adapting transfer techniques to key differences in generational learning styles and motivations. Stakeholder Benefit from Serious Games and Simulations in KM Initiatives [1] ConferenceBoard.(2008).BridgingtheGap-HowtoTransferKnowledgein Today’sIntergenerationalWorkplace.TheConferenceBoardMature WorkforceInitiative.SpecialReportR-1428-08-RR.ConferenceBoardInc.
  34. 34. • Leadership, Teamship, Communityship, Communications Training Workshops • Mentoring • Peer Assist • Podcast • Retrospect • Storytelling • Wikis • Action Review • Blogs • Communities of Practice (CoPs) • Instant Messaging • Knowledge Capture • Knowledge Elicitation • Knowledge Distillation • Knowledge Self-Capture Stakeholder Benefit from Serious Games and Simulations in KM Initiatives? [2] Knowledge Transfer Methods: Inter-Generational Considerations & Adaptations From:ConferenceBoard.(2008).BridgingtheGap-HowtoTransferKnowledgeinToday’sIntergenerational Workplace.TheConferenceBoardMatureWorkforceInitiative.SpecialReportR-1428-08-RR.ConferenceBoardInc. 2015 KM Australia Conference 34
  35. 35. • Gamification Must Be FUN! and Exhibit Significant Value to be Successful • My Workshop Will Provide More of An Experiential Introduction Parting Remarks From:http://thekojonnamdishow.org/shows/2014-12-22/golden_age_of_board_games 2015 KM Australia Conference 35
  36. 36. Wrap Up & Discussion 2015 KM Australia Conference 36
  37. 37. • This presentation is Copyright © 2015, Michael Sutton, unless otherwise cited. • No part of this presentation (document) may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of Dr. Michael Sutton. • These PowerPoint Presentation Slides were made available exclusively to participants in the 2015 KM Australia. Under copyright law, Dr. Michael Sutton is granting fair use of a copy of this document for your personal files, internal training and development, or for university teaching. Intellectual Property Statement [1] 2015 KM Australia Conference 37
  38. 38. • Under no circumstances may portions of this material be used for, or incorporated into, your own reports, presentations, workshops or seminars without obtaining written permission from the author and attributing accordingly. • Historically, the author have not withheld consent to incorporate or use specific portions of this material to a reasonable requester. The author only asks that the following conditions be met, in addition to receiving his written permission: • 1) appropriate attribution within your presentation or report and • 2) Starbucks Card/Gift Loaded from remotely from your location for at least 2 Grande “Cafe Lattes” that I can use at my local Starbucks or other well attired coffee establishment. Intellectual Property Statement [2] 2015 KM Australia Conference 38
  39. 39. • Chua, A. Y. (2005). The design and implementation of a simulation game for teaching knowledge management. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 56(11), 1207-1216. • Leemkuil, H., de Jong, T., de Hoog, R., & Christoph, N. (2003). KM QUEST: A collaborative Internet-based simulation game. Simulation & gaming, 34(1), 89-111. • Baquet, Z. (2013). Life in the Village: Using Simulations to Learn. USAID. • Hlupic, V., Verbraeck, A., & de Vreede, G. J. (2002). Simulation and knowledge management: Separated but inseparable. In 14th European Simulation Symposium. • Handzic, M. (2004). Knowledge management: Through the technology glass. World Scientific. (Chap. 12, Adventures in Knowledgeland) • Luban, F., & Hîncu, D. (2009). Interdependency between simulation model development and knowledge management. Theoretical and Empirical Researches in Urban Management, 1(10), 75-85. • Celemi Tango™ • six knowledge-intensive firms enter into stiff competition as they try to win clients and recruit key personnel in a rapidly changing marketplace. The overriding challenge is to develop both the intangible and tangible assets of the company and to secure the long-term profitability. Other Gamification and Knowledge Management Resources 2015 KM Australia Conference 39

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