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Sutton-Jorge KM and gamification v1-r2

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Could Serious Games & Simulations Motivate Stakeholder Strategy in Knowledge Management Projects?

Discussion of the Benefits and Rationale for incorporating games into Knowledge Management initiatives.

Presentation to Southern African Knowledge Management Summit, May 2015

Published in: Business
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Sutton-Jorge KM and gamification v1-r2

  1. 1. Southern African Knowledge Management Summit, May 2015 Dr. Michael Sutton Carlos Francisco Bitencourt Jorge Westminster College UNSP (Brazil) michaeljdsutton@gmail.com bitencourt@gmail.com Could Serious Games & Simulations Motivate Stakeholder Strategy in Knowledge Management Projects?
  2. 2. Introductions  Michael Sutton, PhD, MIT, ADMA, CMC, ISP – Associate Professor, Management and Marketing Division – Wizened Designer and Player in Gamification, Serious Games, and Simulations  Westminster College, Bill and Vieve Gore School of Business  1840 South 1300 East | Salt Lake City, UT 84105 USA  Tel: (801) 832-2563 | Cell: (801) 910-3739  Email: msutton@westminstercollege.edu Blog: http://michaeljdsutton.net  LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/michaeljdsutton  Carlos Francisco Bitencourt Jorge, MSc., MBA – PhD Candidate, Adj. Professor & Management Consultant – Emerging Novice Designer and Player in Gamification, Serious Games, and Simulations  Universidade Estadual Paulista Júlio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP)  Information, Knowledge, and Organizational Intelligence  Marília, São Paulo, Brazil  Email: bitencourt@gmail.com Twitter: CBitencourt  LinkedIn: https://br.linkedin.com/pub/carlos-francisco-bitencourt-jorge/5a/552/86/en 2015 South African Knowledge Management Summit 2
  3. 3. Intellectual Property Statement [1]  This presentation is Copyright © 2015, Michael Sutton & Carlos Francisco Bitencourt Jorge, unless otherwise cited.  No part of this presentation (document) may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of Dr. Michael Sutton or Carlos Francisco Bitencourt Jorge.  These PowerPoint Presentation Slides were made available exclusively to participants in the 2015 South African KM Summit. Under copyright law, Dr. Michael Sutton and Carlos Francisco Bitencourt Jorge are granting fair use of a copy of this document for your personal files, internal training and development, or for university teaching. 3 2015 South African Knowledge Management Summit
  4. 4. Intellectual Property Statement [2]  Under no circumstances may portions of this material be used for, or incorporated into, your own reports, presentations, workshops or seminars without obtaining written permission from the authors and attributing accordingly.  Historically, the authors have not withheld consent to incorporate or use specific portions of this material to a reasonable requester. The authors only asks that the following conditions be met, in addition to receiving his written permission: – 1) appropriate attribution within your presentation or report and – 2) Starbucks Card/Gift Load from their site for at least 2 loaded “Cafe Lattes” that I can use at my local Starbucks or other well attired coffee establishment. 4 2015 South African Knowledge Management Summit
  5. 5. Agenda 1. Why Games and Simulations? 2. What Is Gamification? 3. Science Behind Gamification 4. What are the Primary Elements of Gamification? 5. Why Gamification and Knowledge Management? 6. What are Sample Processes Involved? 7. Why Use Gamification in KM Initiatives 8. How Could Stakeholders Benefit from Serious Games and Simulations and in KM Initiatives? 9. Gamification: Intersection of Games, Simulations, and Learning 10. Why the Jorge-Sutton Funification Framework? 11. Wrap Up & Questions? 2015 South African Knowledge Management Summit 5
  6. 6. Why Games and Simulations (Sims)? [1] – Hugos, M. (2012). Enterprise Games: Using Game Mechanics to Build a Better Business. Sebastopol, CA: O'Reilly Media, Inc. 2015 South African Knowledge Management Summit 6
  7. 7. Why Games and Simulations (Sims)? [2] – Hugos, M. (2012). Enterprise Games: Using Game Mechanics to Build a Better Business. Sebastopol, CA: O'Reilly Media, Inc. 2015 South African Knowledge Management Summit 7
  8. 8. Why Games and Simulations (Sims)? [3]  Game: – A system in which players engage in an abstract challenge, defined by rules, interactivity, and feedback, that results in a quantifiable outcome often eliciting an emotional reaction.  Kapp, K. M. (2014). The gamification of learning and instruction fieldbook: Ideas into practice. New York: John Wiley & Sons, p. 37) 2015 South African Knowledge Management Summit 8 From:http://thekojonnamdishow.org/shows/2014-12-22/golden_age_of_board_games
  9. 9. Why Games and Simulations (Sims)? [4]  Simulations: – “In a game, what we’re triggering is the competitive/cooperative spirit, what we’re triggering is a playfulness, and what we’re triggering is the achievement, greed and victory element. All of which I think have not only a psychological impact but an actual physiological impact on folks.” – “You can have a game that’s not a simulation and a simulation that’s not a game, but when you get one that does both, it’s a real kick-ass situation.”—Elliott Masie  In Prensky, M. (2001), “Simulations”: Are They Games? In Digital Game-Based Learning. McGraw-Hill. 2015 South African Knowledge Management Summit 9 From:http://www.cenandu.com/blogging/lists/tools/celemi-tango-376
  10. 10. Why Games and Simulations (Sims)? [5] – Hugos, M. (201). Enterprise Games: Using Game Mechanics to Build a Better Business. Sebastopol, CA: O'Reilly Media, Inc. 2015 South African Knowledge Management Summit 10
  11. 11. What Is Gamification? [1]  ADG Creative: Gamification—Good for Business – https://youtu.be/Hb-lPCdF5Ew  “Gamification is the process of taking something that already exists – a website, an enterprise application, an online community – and integrating game mechanics into it to motivate participation, engagement, and loyalty.”  “Gamification takes the data-driven techniques that game designers use to engage players, and applies them to non-game experiences to motivate actions that add value to your business.”—Bunchball, San Mateo, CA, USA (http://www.bunchball.com/gamification) 2015 South African Knowledge Management Summit 11
  12. 12. What Is Gamification? [2]  “When people hear gamification, they envision games created for a business purpose.  But gamification is not about creating something new. It is about amplifying the effect of an existing, core experience by applying the motivational techniques that make games so engaging.  When you increase high-value interactions with customers, employees, and partners, you drive more sales, stronger collaboration, better ROI, deeper loyalty, higher customer satisfaction and more.  Gamification is built upon 10 primary game mechanics, proven to motivate and engage users, and may use any combination of these techniques to accomplish business goals.” – —Bunchball, San Mateo, CA, USA (http://www.bunchball.com/gamification) 2015 South African Knowledge Management Summit 12
  13. 13. What Is Gamification? [3]  Gamification is the craft of deriving all the fun and addicting elements found in games and applying them to real- world or productive activities.  “Human-Focused Design” asopposed to the “Function- Focused Design.” It’s a design process that optimizes for the human in the system, as opposed to pure efficiency of the system. – —Yu-kai Chou, Actionable Gamification: Beyond Points, Badges, and Leaderboards (2015). 2015 South African Knowledge Management Summit 13 From:https://leanpub.com/actionable-gamification-beyond-points-badges-leaderboards
  14. 14. Science Behind Gamification  “Gamification is about much more than simply rewarding points and badges, but rather understanding and influencing the human behaviours companies want to encourage among their users.  Gamification is founded in the fundamentals of human psychology and behavioral science, and rests on three primary factors: motivation, ability level and triggers.” – —Stephen Dale 2015 South African Knowledge Management Summit 14 Adaptedfrom:Dale,S.(n.d.)EngagementStrategies&Techniques.PresentationatCollabor8Now
  15. 15. What are the Primary Elements of Gamification? [1] 2015 South African Knowledge Management Summit 15 From:http://www.gameonlab.com/canvas/
  16. 16. What are the Primary Elements of Gamification? [2] 2015 South African Knowledge Management Summit 16 From:https://www.behance.net/gallery/Graduation-Thesis-Leveling-up-Facebook-Apps/5383819
  17. 17. What are the Primary Elements of Gamification? [2] 2015 South African Knowledge Management Summit 17 http://ivanteh-runningman.blogspot.com/2015/04/gamification-of-learning.html
  18. 18. Why Gamification and Knowledge Management? [1]  Straits Knowledge: KM Planning Toolkit – Knowledge Management Planning Canvas – KM Diagnostic Cards – Organisation Culture Cards – KM Method Cards and – KM Approaches Methods and Tools Guidebook 2015 South African Knowledge Management Summit 18 From:http://www.straitsknowledge.com/store_new/planningtoolkit/
  19. 19. Why Gamification and Knowledge Management? [2]  Bird Island KM Game: – Demonstrating measurable performance improvement through KM 2015 South African Knowledge Management Summit 19 From:http://www.knoco.com/Nick%20Milton_Bird%20Island.pdf
  20. 20. Why Gamification and Knowledge Management? [3]  FreshBiz Board Game – based upon best selling book, The New Entrepreneurz – platform provides an enterprise fun game-based learning experience – develop and simulate smarter ways of doing business. 2015 South African Knowledge Management Summit 20 From:http://www.freshbizgame.com/freshbiz-workshop/
  21. 21. Why Gamification and Knowledge Management? [4]  Chua, A. Y. (2005). The design and implementation of a simulation game for teaching knowledge management. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 56(11), 1207-1216.  Leemkuil, H., de Jong, T., de Hoog, R., & Christoph, N. (2003). KM QUEST: A collaborative Internet-based simulation game. Simulation & gaming, 34(1), 89-111.  Baquet, Z. (2013). Life in the Village: Using Simulations to Learn. USAID.  Hlupic, V., Verbraeck, A., & de Vreede, G. J. (2002). Simulation and knowledge management: Separated but inseparable. In 14th European Simulation Symposium.  Handzic, M. (2004). Knowledge management: Through the technology glass. World Scientific. (Chap. 12, Adventures in Knowledgeland)  Luban, F., & Hîncu, D. (2009). Interdependency between simulation model development and knowledge management. Theoretical and Empirical Researches in Urban Management, 1(10), 75-85.  Celemi Tango™ – six knowledge-intensive firms enter into stiff competition as they try to win clients and recruit key personnel in a rapidly changing marketplace. The overriding challenge is to develop both the intangible and tangible assets of the company and to secure the long-term profitability. 2015 South African Knowledge Management Summit 21
  22. 22. What are Sample Processes Involved? [1]  Knowledge EcoSystem 2015 South African Knowledge Management Summit 22 From:http://www.tlainc.com/articl249.htm
  23. 23. What are Sample Processes Involved? [2]  SECI Model 2015 South African Knowledge Management Summit 23 From:https://www.cbased.com/en/consultation/wise-leader-von-ikujiro-nonaka/chapter/11786
  24. 24. What are Sample Processes Involved? [3]  Understanding K* and what it means for knowledge exchange in Scotland 2015 South African Knowledge Management Summit 24 From:http://crfrblog.blogspot.com/2014/08/understanding-k-and-what-it-means-for.html
  25. 25. Why Use Gamification in KM Initiatives? [1] 2015 South African Knowledge Management Summit 25 Adaptedfrom:http://12most.com/2012/03/13/12-striking-tendencies-creative-people/
  26. 26. Why Use Gamification in KM Initiatives? [2] 2015 South African Knowledge Management Summit 26 From:http://www.gartner.com/newsroom/id/2575515
  27. 27. Why Use Gamification in KM Initiatives? [3]  80% of current gamified applications will fail to meet business objectives primarily due to poor design – (Source: Gartner)  Projected gamification growth to reach $5B (£3B) by 2018. – (Source: Mind Commerce)  Over 1,400 global organizations will deploy gamification applications for employee performance, healthcare, marketing and training by 2014. – (Source: Gartner)  80% of 2000 global organizations “will have gamified applications and/or processes” by 2017. – (Source: Mind Commerce)  50% of innovation practices will be gamified by 2015. – (Source: Gartner)  40%+ of all gamers are women. – (Source: Reality is Broken, Jane McGonigal)  25% of gamers are > 50 yrs. old – (Source: Reality is Broken, Jane McGonigal) 2015 South African Knowledge Management Summit 27 Adaptedfrom:Dale,S.(n.d.)EngagementStrategies&Techniques.PresentationatCollabor8Now Business Value Proposition for Funification (Gamification within KM)
  28. 28. Why Use Gamification in KM Initiatives? [4]  5 Key Benefits Gamification Brings to an Enterprise – — Brousell, L. (2013). CIO Magazine 1. Help collect powerful customer data 2. Crowdsourcing through gamification helps you solve complex business problems 3. Act as an educational tool 4. Offers a way to give back to the community 5. Help the firm stay relevant with customers 2015 South African Knowledge Management Summit 28 From:http://www.cio.com/article/2384745/it-organization/5-key-benefits-gamification-brings-to-your-business.html
  29. 29. How Could Stakeholders Benefit from Serious Games and Simulations in KM Initiatives? [1]  Intergenerational Stakeholders: 1. Because so much knowledge transfer is cross-generational, an understanding of different learning styles facilitates the process. 2. Understanding generational learning preferences can make the difference between merely harvesting knowledge and actually using it. 3. In most cases, the knowledge provided by a source will need to be adapted to fit the needs of the receiver. 4. This process may require adapting transfer techniques to key differences in generational learning styles and motivations.  Conference Board. (2008). Bridging the Gap - How to Transfer Knowledge in Today’s Intergenerational Workplace. The Conference Board Mature Workforce Initiative. Special Report R-1428-08-RR. Conference Board Inc. 2015 South African Knowledge Management Summit 29
  30. 30. How Could Stakeholders Benefit from Serious Games and Simulations in KM Initiatives? [2]  Action Review  Blogs  Communities of Practice (CoPs)  Instant Messaging  Knowledge Capture  Knowledge Elicitation  Knowledge Distillation  Knowledge Self-Capture  Leadership, Teamship, Communityship, Communications Training Workshops  Mentoring  Peer Assist  Podcast  Retrospect  Storytelling  Wikis 2015 South African Knowledge Management Summit 30 Knowledge Transfer Methods: Generational Considerations and Adaptations From: Conference Board. (2008). Bridging the Gap - How to Transfer Knowledge in Today’s Intergenerational Workplace. The Conference Board Mature Workforce Initiative. Special Report R-1428-08-RR. Conference Board Inc.
  31. 31. How Could Stakeholders Benefit from Serious Games and Simulations in KM Initiatives? [3]  Serious Game Market by Vertical, Application, Platform, End-User, and Region - Forecast to 2020, published by MarketsandMarkets: – Serious Game Market is estimated to reach $5,448.82 Million by 2020, at a CAGR of 16.38% between 2015 and 2020. – Serious Games Market segmented based on verticals:  aerospace & defense,  automotive,  corporate,  education,  energy,  government,  healthcare,  retail,  media & advertising, and  others. – The education and corporate segments account for the major share of the market and are also expected to grow at the highest CAGR between 2015 and 2020. 2015 South African Knowledge Management Summit 31 http://seriousgamesmarket.blogspot.com/
  32. 32. Gamification: Intersection of Games, Simulations, and Learning 2015 South African Knowledge Management Summit 32 From: Martens, A., Holger D., & Steffen, M. Game-based Learning with Computers–Learning, Simulations, and Games. Transactions on Edutainment I. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2008. 172-190.
  33. 33. Why the Jorge-Sutton Funification Framework? [1] 2015 South African Knowledge Management Summit 33
  34. 34. Why the Jorge-Sutton Funification Framework? [2] 2015 South African Knowledge Management Summit 34
  35. 35. Wrap Up & Questions? 2015 South African Knowledge Management Summit 35
  36. 36. Parting Shots… 2015 South African Knowledge Management Summit 36

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